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Academic Year/course: 2021/22

3354 - Bachelor's degree programme in Global Studies

24096 - Global Security and Conflicts


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2021/22
Academic Center:
335 - Faculty of Humanities
Study:
3354 - Bachelor's degree programme in Global Studies
Subject:
24096 - Global Security and Conflicts
Credits:
4.0
Course:
3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Teachers:
Laura Planas Gifra
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

VERY IMPORTANT: THIS PDA IS ANOTHER ACADEMIC YEAR'S ONE. SO IT CAN SUFFER SOME NON SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES WHEN ADAPTED TO THE CURRENT YEAR.

 

What are the most pressing security issues in the first half of the 21st Century? What are the main active conflicts and how do they impact the global security agenda? What are the main drivers of these conflicts? Are these conflicts “new”? What is the prevailing understanding of security in Global Studies? What is the role of different actors in the definition and implementation of global security strategies?

This course seeks three complementary goals: first, it aims at familiarizing students with the main notions and theoretical approaches to the study of contemporary security and conflict; second, it analyses the evolution of contemporary conflict, as well as the transformation of conventional and non-conventional challenges to global security; third, it explores some conflicts and security challenges particularly relevant for the understanding of contemporary security and, more broadly, global international relations. 

Students are encouraged to enrol in this course if they are interested in the transformation of global security and conflicts in the past two decades, the gradual privatization of the global security agenda and its implications for both the definition and implementation of global security strategies. Students interested in the particularities, main drivers, and global implications of some of the most relevant contemporary international conflicts may also be interested in this course.

Associated skills

This course aims at developing several skills and capacities. More precisely, it seeks:

1. To introduce students to the various definitions of global security, their core dimensions, and their implications for both the design and implementation of global security strategies.

2. To familiarize students with the main active contemporary conflicts, their main drivers, and their impact on global relations.

3. To introduce students to the transformation of international and domestic conflicts, and their interplay with global dynamics and trends.

4. To promote the students’ capacities for critical and ethical thinking, and for analysing the many factors and actors interacting in global security and international conflicts.

5. To foster the capacity of students for group work, as well as their capacity to elaborate and present timely, well-written, brief reports.

6. To engage students in class debates, thus strengthening their capacity to present their ideas in a precise and clear manner, as well as their ability to deliver oral presentations.

Learning outcomes

Students completing this course are expected to achieve the following learning outcomes:

* To understand the main factors contributing to the emergence and development of international conflicts.

* To identify the main divergences between several understandings of security, as well as their profound political implications for the design and implementation of global security strategies.

* To produce rigrous, well-informed,timely reports.

* To deliver professional, engaging oral presentations.

* To mediate and negotiate under pressure.

Sustainable Development Goals

  • No poverty
  • Zero hunger
  • Gender equality
  • Good health and well-being
  • Affordable, clean energy
  • Decent work and economic growth
  • Reduced inequalities
  • Climate action
  • Peace, justice and strong institutions
  • Life on land

Prerequisites

Students are not required to complete any readings before the start of the course. The course does not require a strong background on Security Studies, but some familiarity with the core notions and debates in the field is advised.

Contents

1. Introduction: Theoretical approaches to security (and Global security)

Buzan, Barry and Hansen, Lene (2009), The Evolution of International Security Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Defining International Security Studies”, pp. 8-20).

 

2. Evolution, transformation, and main features of contemporary armed conflicts. The feminization of wars.

Sheehan, M. (2011), “The changing character of war”, in Baylis, J., Smith, S. and Owen, P. (eds.) (5th ed.), The Globalization of World Politics. An introduction to international relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-225.

Chinkin, Christine and Kaldor, Mary (2017), International Law and New Wars, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Introduction”, pp. 3-34).

 

3. The privatization of contemporary global security: origins, actors, and implications

Avant, D. (2004), “The Privatization of Security and Change in the Control of Force”, International Studies Perspectives, vol. 5, num. 2, pp. 153-157.

 

4. Conflict, sovereignty, and geopolitics 

Lynn-Jones, S. M. (2010), “Preface”, in Brown, M. E. et al. (eds.), Going Nuclear: Nuclear proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century, Cambridge/London: The MIT Press, pp. xi-xlviii.

 

5. Conflict, energy, and natural resources 

Runge Olessen, M. (2014), Cooperation or Conflict in the Arctic: A Literature Review, DIIS Working Paper 2014:8, Copenhagen: DIIS.

Guoqiang Li (2017), “The origins of the South China Sea issue”, Journal of Modern Chinese History, vol. 11, num. 1, pp. 112-126.

 

6. Conflict, ethnicity, and Human Rights 

Olzak, S. (2011), “Does Globalization Breed Ethnic Discontent?”, Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 55, num. 1, pp. 3-32.

Reyntjens, Filip (1996), “Rwanda: Genocide and Beyond”, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 9, num. 3, pp. 240-251.

 

7. Conflict, transnational crime, and State fragility 

Johnson, D. H. (2004), The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars, 2nd edition, Oxford/Bloomington: The International African Institute, Fountain Publishers, and East African Education Publishers (“The historical structure of North-South relations”, pp. 1-9).

 

Teaching Methods

This course aims at involving students in the design of the learning experience, as well as to develop the students' capacity to solve problems. In order to do so, the course blends several teaching methods:

* Lectures on the different topics included in the section of "Contents".

* Oral presentations.

* Group simulations and activities.

* In-class debates.

 

Depending on the evolution of public health situation due to COVID19, the number of face to face and online classes may vary. If more face to face classes were possible, your professor will inform you which kind of activities will be held.   

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated through three main components: 1) seminars (30%); 2) a 10-page final research paper (50%); and 3) a short presentation of their research in groups (20%).

Students will be presented a list of active conflicts and will be asked to choose one in the two first weeks of the course. This topic will be the basis for both the oral presentation and the final research paper. Students will be asked to work in groups.

Presentations will be from week 3 to 9 of the course, according to the calendar established by the end of week 2 of the course. The number of students in each group will depend on the total number of students in class and the hours available. Students are encouraged to use audio-visual materials to support their presentations.

All final research papers are to be submitted in the last week of the course via e-mail to the professor.

Papers’ format: Papers should be typed, double-spaced, font Times New Roman, size 12, with 1-inch margins on all four sides. Please insert page numbers. The papers are to be organized in sections with their own subtitles. A bibliographical list of sources that have been used and in-text references to each of these sources are required.

* Students delivering the oral presentation and submitting the final paper during the semester who obtain a final global grade below 5,0 will have the opportunity to re-take the course during the period established by the university. This re-take opportunity will entail the submission of a new 12-page research paper on a diffente topic from the one chosen during the semester. The grade obtained in this paper will replace all grades obtained throughout the term (that is, it will be worth 100% of the final grade). 

Bibliography and information resources

Buzan, Barry and Hansen, Lene (2009), The Evolution of International Security Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Defining International Security Studies”, pp. 8-20).

 

Sheehan, M. (2011), “The changing character of war”, in Baylis, J., Smith, S. and Owen, P. (eds.) (5th ed.), The Globalization of World Politics. An introduction to international relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-225.

 

Chinkin, Christine and Kaldor, Mary (2017), International Law and New Wars, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Introduction”, pp. 3-34).

 

Avant, D. (2004), “The Privatization of Security and Change in the Control of Force”, International Studies Perspectives, vol. 5, num. 2, pp. 153-157. 

 

Lynn-Jones, S. M. (2010), “Preface”, in Brown, M. E. et al. (eds.), Going Nuclear: Nuclear proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century, Cambridge/London: The MIT Press, pp. xi-xlviii.

 

Runge Olessen, M. (2014), Cooperation or Conflict in the Arctic: A Literature Review, DIIS Working Paper 2014:8, Copenhagen: DIIS.

 

Guoqiang Li (2017), “The origins of the South China Sea issue”, Journal of Modern Chinese History, vol. 11, num. 1, pp. 112-126.

 

Olzak, S. (2011), “Does Globalization Breed Ethnic Discontent?”, Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 55, num. 1, pp. 3-32.

Reyntjens, Filip (1996), “Rwanda: Genocide and Beyond”, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 9, num. 3, pp. 240-251.

 

Johnson, D. H. (2004), The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars, 2nd edition, Oxford/Bloomington: The International African Institute, Fountain Publishers, and East African Education Publishers (“The historical structure of North-South relations”, pp. 1-9).

 


Academic Year/course: 2021/22

3354 - Bachelor's degree programme in Global Studies

24096 - Global Security and Conflicts


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2021/22
Academic Center:
335 - Faculty of Humanities
Study:
3354 - Bachelor's degree programme in Global Studies
Subject:
24096 - Global Security and Conflicts
Credits:
4.0
Course:
3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Teachers:
Laura Planas Gifra
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

VERY IMPORTANT: THIS PDA IS ANOTHER ACADEMIC YEAR'S ONE. SO IT CAN SUFFER SOME NON SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES WHEN ADAPTED TO THE CURRENT YEAR.

 

What are the most pressing security issues in the first half of the 21st Century? What are the main active conflicts and how do they impact the global security agenda? What are the main drivers of these conflicts? Are these conflicts “new”? What is the prevailing understanding of security in Global Studies? What is the role of different actors in the definition and implementation of global security strategies?

This course seeks three complementary goals: first, it aims at familiarizing students with the main notions and theoretical approaches to the study of contemporary security and conflict; second, it analyses the evolution of contemporary conflict, as well as the transformation of conventional and non-conventional challenges to global security; third, it explores some conflicts and security challenges particularly relevant for the understanding of contemporary security and, more broadly, global international relations. 

Students are encouraged to enrol in this course if they are interested in the transformation of global security and conflicts in the past two decades, the gradual privatization of the global security agenda and its implications for both the definition and implementation of global security strategies. Students interested in the particularities, main drivers, and global implications of some of the most relevant contemporary international conflicts may also be interested in this course.

Associated skills

This course aims at developing several skills and capacities. More precisely, it seeks:

1. To introduce students to the various definitions of global security, their core dimensions, and their implications for both the design and implementation of global security strategies.

2. To familiarize students with the main active contemporary conflicts, their main drivers, and their impact on global relations.

3. To introduce students to the transformation of international and domestic conflicts, and their interplay with global dynamics and trends.

4. To promote the students’ capacities for critical and ethical thinking, and for analysing the many factors and actors interacting in global security and international conflicts.

5. To foster the capacity of students for group work, as well as their capacity to elaborate and present timely, well-written, brief reports.

6. To engage students in class debates, thus strengthening their capacity to present their ideas in a precise and clear manner, as well as their ability to deliver oral presentations.

Learning outcomes

Students completing this course are expected to achieve the following learning outcomes:

* To understand the main factors contributing to the emergence and development of international conflicts.

* To identify the main divergences between several understandings of security, as well as their profound political implications for the design and implementation of global security strategies.

* To produce rigrous, well-informed,timely reports.

* To deliver professional, engaging oral presentations.

* To mediate and negotiate under pressure.

Sustainable Development Goals

  • No poverty
  • Zero hunger
  • Gender equality
  • Good health and well-being
  • Affordable, clean energy
  • Decent work and economic growth
  • Reduced inequalities
  • Climate action
  • Peace, justice and strong institutions
  • Life on land

Prerequisites

Students are not required to complete any readings before the start of the course. The course does not require a strong background on Security Studies, but some familiarity with the core notions and debates in the field is advised.

Contents

1. Introduction: Theoretical approaches to security (and Global security)

Buzan, Barry and Hansen, Lene (2009), The Evolution of International Security Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Defining International Security Studies”, pp. 8-20).

 

2. Evolution, transformation, and main features of contemporary armed conflicts. The feminization of wars.

Sheehan, M. (2011), “The changing character of war”, in Baylis, J., Smith, S. and Owen, P. (eds.) (5th ed.), The Globalization of World Politics. An introduction to international relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-225.

Chinkin, Christine and Kaldor, Mary (2017), International Law and New Wars, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Introduction”, pp. 3-34).

 

3. The privatization of contemporary global security: origins, actors, and implications

Avant, D. (2004), “The Privatization of Security and Change in the Control of Force”, International Studies Perspectives, vol. 5, num. 2, pp. 153-157.

 

4. Conflict, sovereignty, and geopolitics 

Lynn-Jones, S. M. (2010), “Preface”, in Brown, M. E. et al. (eds.), Going Nuclear: Nuclear proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century, Cambridge/London: The MIT Press, pp. xi-xlviii.

 

5. Conflict, energy, and natural resources 

Runge Olessen, M. (2014), Cooperation or Conflict in the Arctic: A Literature Review, DIIS Working Paper 2014:8, Copenhagen: DIIS.

Guoqiang Li (2017), “The origins of the South China Sea issue”, Journal of Modern Chinese History, vol. 11, num. 1, pp. 112-126.

 

6. Conflict, ethnicity, and Human Rights 

Olzak, S. (2011), “Does Globalization Breed Ethnic Discontent?”, Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 55, num. 1, pp. 3-32.

Reyntjens, Filip (1996), “Rwanda: Genocide and Beyond”, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 9, num. 3, pp. 240-251.

 

7. Conflict, transnational crime, and State fragility 

Johnson, D. H. (2004), The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars, 2nd edition, Oxford/Bloomington: The International African Institute, Fountain Publishers, and East African Education Publishers (“The historical structure of North-South relations”, pp. 1-9).

 

Teaching Methods

This course aims at involving students in the design of the learning experience, as well as to develop the students' capacity to solve problems. In order to do so, the course blends several teaching methods:

* Lectures on the different topics included in the section of "Contents".

* Oral presentations.

* Group simulations and activities.

* In-class debates.

 

Depending on the evolution of public health situation due to COVID19, the number of face to face and online classes may vary. If more face to face classes were possible, your professor will inform you which kind of activities will be held.   

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated through three main components: 1) seminars (30%); 2) a 10-page final research paper (50%); and 3) a short presentation of their research in groups (20%).

Students will be presented a list of active conflicts and will be asked to choose one in the two first weeks of the course. This topic will be the basis for both the oral presentation and the final research paper. Students will be asked to work in groups.

Presentations will be from week 3 to 9 of the course, according to the calendar established by the end of week 2 of the course. The number of students in each group will depend on the total number of students in class and the hours available. Students are encouraged to use audio-visual materials to support their presentations.

All final research papers are to be submitted in the last week of the course via e-mail to the professor.

Papers’ format: Papers should be typed, double-spaced, font Times New Roman, size 12, with 1-inch margins on all four sides. Please insert page numbers. The papers are to be organized in sections with their own subtitles. A bibliographical list of sources that have been used and in-text references to each of these sources are required.

* Students delivering the oral presentation and submitting the final paper during the semester who obtain a final global grade below 5,0 will have the opportunity to re-take the course during the period established by the university. This re-take opportunity will entail the submission of a new 12-page research paper on a diffente topic from the one chosen during the semester. The grade obtained in this paper will replace all grades obtained throughout the term (that is, it will be worth 100% of the final grade). 

Bibliography and information resources

Buzan, Barry and Hansen, Lene (2009), The Evolution of International Security Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Defining International Security Studies”, pp. 8-20).

 

Sheehan, M. (2011), “The changing character of war”, in Baylis, J., Smith, S. and Owen, P. (eds.) (5th ed.), The Globalization of World Politics. An introduction to international relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-225.

 

Chinkin, Christine and Kaldor, Mary (2017), International Law and New Wars, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Introduction”, pp. 3-34).

 

Avant, D. (2004), “The Privatization of Security and Change in the Control of Force”, International Studies Perspectives, vol. 5, num. 2, pp. 153-157. 

 

Lynn-Jones, S. M. (2010), “Preface”, in Brown, M. E. et al. (eds.), Going Nuclear: Nuclear proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century, Cambridge/London: The MIT Press, pp. xi-xlviii.

 

Runge Olessen, M. (2014), Cooperation or Conflict in the Arctic: A Literature Review, DIIS Working Paper 2014:8, Copenhagen: DIIS.

 

Guoqiang Li (2017), “The origins of the South China Sea issue”, Journal of Modern Chinese History, vol. 11, num. 1, pp. 112-126.

 

Olzak, S. (2011), “Does Globalization Breed Ethnic Discontent?”, Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 55, num. 1, pp. 3-32.

Reyntjens, Filip (1996), “Rwanda: Genocide and Beyond”, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 9, num. 3, pp. 240-251.

 

Johnson, D. H. (2004), The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars, 2nd edition, Oxford/Bloomington: The International African Institute, Fountain Publishers, and East African Education Publishers (“The historical structure of North-South relations”, pp. 1-9).

 


Academic Year/course: 2021/22

3354 - Bachelor's degree programme in Global Studies

24096 - Global Security and Conflicts


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2021/22
Academic Center:
335 - Faculty of Humanities
Study:
3354 - Bachelor's degree programme in Global Studies
Subject:
24096 - Global Security and Conflicts
Credits:
4.0
Course:
3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Teachers:
Laura Planas Gifra
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

VERY IMPORTANT: THIS PDA IS ANOTHER ACADEMIC YEAR'S ONE. SO IT CAN SUFFER SOME NON SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES WHEN ADAPTED TO THE CURRENT YEAR.

 

What are the most pressing security issues in the first half of the 21st Century? What are the main active conflicts and how do they impact the global security agenda? What are the main drivers of these conflicts? Are these conflicts “new”? What is the prevailing understanding of security in Global Studies? What is the role of different actors in the definition and implementation of global security strategies?

This course seeks three complementary goals: first, it aims at familiarizing students with the main notions and theoretical approaches to the study of contemporary security and conflict; second, it analyses the evolution of contemporary conflict, as well as the transformation of conventional and non-conventional challenges to global security; third, it explores some conflicts and security challenges particularly relevant for the understanding of contemporary security and, more broadly, global international relations. 

Students are encouraged to enrol in this course if they are interested in the transformation of global security and conflicts in the past two decades, the gradual privatization of the global security agenda and its implications for both the definition and implementation of global security strategies. Students interested in the particularities, main drivers, and global implications of some of the most relevant contemporary international conflicts may also be interested in this course.

Associated skills

This course aims at developing several skills and capacities. More precisely, it seeks:

1. To introduce students to the various definitions of global security, their core dimensions, and their implications for both the design and implementation of global security strategies.

2. To familiarize students with the main active contemporary conflicts, their main drivers, and their impact on global relations.

3. To introduce students to the transformation of international and domestic conflicts, and their interplay with global dynamics and trends.

4. To promote the students’ capacities for critical and ethical thinking, and for analysing the many factors and actors interacting in global security and international conflicts.

5. To foster the capacity of students for group work, as well as their capacity to elaborate and present timely, well-written, brief reports.

6. To engage students in class debates, thus strengthening their capacity to present their ideas in a precise and clear manner, as well as their ability to deliver oral presentations.

Learning outcomes

Students completing this course are expected to achieve the following learning outcomes:

* To understand the main factors contributing to the emergence and development of international conflicts.

* To identify the main divergences between several understandings of security, as well as their profound political implications for the design and implementation of global security strategies.

* To produce rigrous, well-informed,timely reports.

* To deliver professional, engaging oral presentations.

* To mediate and negotiate under pressure.

Sustainable Development Goals

  • No poverty
  • Zero hunger
  • Gender equality
  • Good health and well-being
  • Affordable, clean energy
  • Decent work and economic growth
  • Reduced inequalities
  • Climate action
  • Peace, justice and strong institutions
  • Life on land

Prerequisites

Students are not required to complete any readings before the start of the course. The course does not require a strong background on Security Studies, but some familiarity with the core notions and debates in the field is advised.

Contents

1. Introduction: Theoretical approaches to security (and Global security)

Buzan, Barry and Hansen, Lene (2009), The Evolution of International Security Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Defining International Security Studies”, pp. 8-20).

 

2. Evolution, transformation, and main features of contemporary armed conflicts. The feminization of wars.

Sheehan, M. (2011), “The changing character of war”, in Baylis, J., Smith, S. and Owen, P. (eds.) (5th ed.), The Globalization of World Politics. An introduction to international relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-225.

Chinkin, Christine and Kaldor, Mary (2017), International Law and New Wars, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Introduction”, pp. 3-34).

 

3. The privatization of contemporary global security: origins, actors, and implications

Avant, D. (2004), “The Privatization of Security and Change in the Control of Force”, International Studies Perspectives, vol. 5, num. 2, pp. 153-157.

 

4. Conflict, sovereignty, and geopolitics 

Lynn-Jones, S. M. (2010), “Preface”, in Brown, M. E. et al. (eds.), Going Nuclear: Nuclear proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century, Cambridge/London: The MIT Press, pp. xi-xlviii.

 

5. Conflict, energy, and natural resources 

Runge Olessen, M. (2014), Cooperation or Conflict in the Arctic: A Literature Review, DIIS Working Paper 2014:8, Copenhagen: DIIS.

Guoqiang Li (2017), “The origins of the South China Sea issue”, Journal of Modern Chinese History, vol. 11, num. 1, pp. 112-126.

 

6. Conflict, ethnicity, and Human Rights 

Olzak, S. (2011), “Does Globalization Breed Ethnic Discontent?”, Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 55, num. 1, pp. 3-32.

Reyntjens, Filip (1996), “Rwanda: Genocide and Beyond”, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 9, num. 3, pp. 240-251.

 

7. Conflict, transnational crime, and State fragility 

Johnson, D. H. (2004), The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars, 2nd edition, Oxford/Bloomington: The International African Institute, Fountain Publishers, and East African Education Publishers (“The historical structure of North-South relations”, pp. 1-9).

 

Teaching Methods

This course aims at involving students in the design of the learning experience, as well as to develop the students' capacity to solve problems. In order to do so, the course blends several teaching methods:

* Lectures on the different topics included in the section of "Contents".

* Oral presentations.

* Group simulations and activities.

* In-class debates.

 

Depending on the evolution of public health situation due to COVID19, the number of face to face and online classes may vary. If more face to face classes were possible, your professor will inform you which kind of activities will be held.   

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated through three main components: 1) seminars (30%); 2) a 10-page final research paper (50%); and 3) a short presentation of their research in groups (20%).

Students will be presented a list of active conflicts and will be asked to choose one in the two first weeks of the course. This topic will be the basis for both the oral presentation and the final research paper. Students will be asked to work in groups.

Presentations will be from week 3 to 9 of the course, according to the calendar established by the end of week 2 of the course. The number of students in each group will depend on the total number of students in class and the hours available. Students are encouraged to use audio-visual materials to support their presentations.

All final research papers are to be submitted in the last week of the course via e-mail to the professor.

Papers’ format: Papers should be typed, double-spaced, font Times New Roman, size 12, with 1-inch margins on all four sides. Please insert page numbers. The papers are to be organized in sections with their own subtitles. A bibliographical list of sources that have been used and in-text references to each of these sources are required.

* Students delivering the oral presentation and submitting the final paper during the semester who obtain a final global grade below 5,0 will have the opportunity to re-take the course during the period established by the university. This re-take opportunity will entail the submission of a new 12-page research paper on a diffente topic from the one chosen during the semester. The grade obtained in this paper will replace all grades obtained throughout the term (that is, it will be worth 100% of the final grade). 

Bibliography and information resources

Buzan, Barry and Hansen, Lene (2009), The Evolution of International Security Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Defining International Security Studies”, pp. 8-20).

 

Sheehan, M. (2011), “The changing character of war”, in Baylis, J., Smith, S. and Owen, P. (eds.) (5th ed.), The Globalization of World Politics. An introduction to international relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-225.

 

Chinkin, Christine and Kaldor, Mary (2017), International Law and New Wars, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (“Introduction”, pp. 3-34).

 

Avant, D. (2004), “The Privatization of Security and Change in the Control of Force”, International Studies Perspectives, vol. 5, num. 2, pp. 153-157. 

 

Lynn-Jones, S. M. (2010), “Preface”, in Brown, M. E. et al. (eds.), Going Nuclear: Nuclear proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century, Cambridge/London: The MIT Press, pp. xi-xlviii.

 

Runge Olessen, M. (2014), Cooperation or Conflict in the Arctic: A Literature Review, DIIS Working Paper 2014:8, Copenhagen: DIIS.

 

Guoqiang Li (2017), “The origins of the South China Sea issue”, Journal of Modern Chinese History, vol. 11, num. 1, pp. 112-126.

 

Olzak, S. (2011), “Does Globalization Breed Ethnic Discontent?”, Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 55, num. 1, pp. 3-32.

Reyntjens, Filip (1996), “Rwanda: Genocide and Beyond”, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 9, num. 3, pp. 240-251.

 

Johnson, D. H. (2004), The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars, 2nd edition, Oxford/Bloomington: The International African Institute, Fountain Publishers, and East African Education Publishers (“The historical structure of North-South relations”, pp. 1-9).