Consulta de Guies Docents



Academic Year: 2022/23

1015 - Màster Digital Culture and Emerging Media

32747 - New Media Literacies


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
801 - Masters Centre of the Department of Communication
Study:
1015 - Màster Digital Culture and Emerging Media
Subject:
32747 - New Media Literacies
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Teachers:
María del Mar Guerrero Pico, Mittzy Jennifer Arciniega Cáceres
Teaching Period:
Second quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Media literacy involves the relationship of two fields of study: education and communication. It has received different names in recent decades such as pedagogy of communication, educommunication, education for television, digital education, and more recently, media and information literacy (MIL). 

In this course we will introduce the students to this field of study through theoretical sessions, workshops and presentations. The aim of the course is to develop basic notions about media literacy, to understand its evolution and to develop the ability to design and produce materials to be applied in different contexts. It is important to highlight that, in recent years, the deep transformations in media ecology have propelled a total rethinking of traditional models of media literacy.

Throughout this subject, students will question and reassess the most traditional formulas in order to understand the concept of media literacy within the new media ecosystems. Grasping the multifaceted dimension of media literacy is essential to identify the mental mechanisms by which mass media and social media operate in order to exert influence on both audiences and users.

Associated skills

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC SKILLS 

  • Possess and understand knowledge that lays the groundwork or opportunity for being original in the development and/or application of ideas, often in a research context.

  • Apply the knowledge they have acquired and solve problems in new or little-known environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to their field of study.

  • Analyse the digital and emerging media, as well as the cultural phenomena around them, using a critical sociocultural perspective with suitable theoretical and methodological development.

  • Design, develop and assess a basic, applied or practice-based research process and transform the results into contributions that are of the interest of society.

  • Collaborate actively on teams to reach objectives shared with other individuals or organisations.

  • Develop the ability to assess inequalities on the basis of sex and gender in order to design solutions.

 

COURSE SPECIFIC SKILLS

  • Use the main theories, approaches and methodologies needed to analyse and assess digital culture and the emergence of new media.

  • Analyse digital culture and the emerging media and the practices associated with them, addressing their communicative, social, political, technological and economic dimensions.

  • Develop scholarly contents in different media and formats for both specialised and non specialised audiences.

  • Assess the potential of applying the theories, methodologies, concepts and results of one’s own research to underpin decision-making in the professional field.

  • Assess the current state of the scholarly study of digital culture and the new media, formulating hypotheses geared at conducting relevant research in the corresponding field or subfield.

Learning outcomes

  • Chooses appropriate theories and methodologies to study digital culture and the emerging media.

  • Applies the most relevant theories and methodologies according to the research objectives.

  • Uses a sociocultural perspective to analyse and interpret the texts, communicative/narrative forms and interaction formats characteristic of the digital environment and compares them appropriately with other media.

  • Analyses and assesses the experiences and cultural practices of users and audiences in the new media environment, paying attention to the interactive-participative dimension.

  • Compares, categorises and critically analyses interactive productions (both fiction and nonfiction) and digital works of art of all kinds.

  • Identifies and analyses the different dimensions (social, cultural, economic, political, technological) expressed and affected by the digital media and productions.

  • Appropriately applies contingency plans to deal with critical situations.

  • Appropriately assesses a research project from an ethical standpoint to identify potential risks, as well as the most suitable protocols to adopt (personal data management, subjects at risk, etc.).

  • Develops texts and documents associated with the different research phases (research project, interim report, poster, scholarly article, conference paper).

  •  Defends the research orally before a specialised audience.

Sustainable Development Goals

Goal 4: Achieve quality education in all stages of life and ensure equal access for the vulnerable.

Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Goal 10: Reduce inequalities and promote equal opportunity

Prerequisites

None.

Contents

Unit 1. What is Media Literacy?

  • Main theories and approaches to media literacy

  • The evolution of media literacy: from broadcasting to the digital age.

  • Media education competences

 

Unit 2. Applications of Media Literacy

  • Universal declarations on media literacy and digital citizenship

  • Legislating on media literacy: Spanish and European education laws

  • The pitfalls of media literacy policies

 

Unit 3. Trends and challenges in Media Literacy

  • Fandom and The New Literacies

  • Social media, videogames and informal learning spaces

  • Transmedia Literacy

  • The trouble with disinformation and infodemic

  • Youth inequalities and the digital gap

 

Unit 4. Researching Media Literacy

  • Main research methods used in media literacy projects: participatory action research and design-based research

  • Selected examples of national and international media literacy interventions

 

The definitive syllabus and class schedule will be available at Aula Global.

Teaching Methods

Throughout the course, different expositive and active learning methods are combined: master classes, individual and group readings, class debates, student presentations, workshops, video screenings, and especially, learning through research/action projects. 

Every week, students will be required to read the texts corresponding to each session so that there will always be a common topic for discussion and participation in the different learning activities.

Evaluation

The assessment of the course is composed of three elements, as detailed in the following table:

 

Item to assess

Type

Weigh (%)

Midterm assignment  

Individual

30%

Research/action project on media literacy

Group

60%

Participation in weekly activities (individual reading, group work, etc.) in the classroom.

Individual

10% 



 

NOTE: The final mark will be the sum of the three items. Students must achieve a  minimum 5/10 mark in all items in order to pass the course.

Course attendance: Students must attend at least 80% of the sessions. More than 2 missed sessions must be properly justified. Whenever a student is absent for unknown reasons for more than two sessions, the instructors will penalise their final grade with -1 for each unexcused absence.

 

 

Bibliography and information resources

Basic

  • Buckingham, David. (2019). The Media Education Manifesto. Polity Press.

  • Bulger, Monica and Davison, Patrick. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute. Retrieved from https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Media_Literacy_2018.pdf

  • Dedding, Christine, Goedhart, Nicole, S., Broerse, Jacqueline E.W.  &  Abma (2021). Exploring the boundaries of ‘good’ Participatory Action Research in times of increasing popularity: dealing with constraints in local policy for digital inclusion. Educational Action Research, 29(1), 20-36. 10.1080/09650792.2020.1743733

  • Epstein, Iris, Stevens, Bonnie, McKeever, Patricia, Baruchel, Sylvain, & Jones, Heather. (2008). Using puppetry to elicit children's talk for research. Nursing Inquiry, 15(1), 49–56. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1800.2008.00395.x

  • Ferrés, Joan and Piscitelli, Alejandro. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08

  • Frau-Meigs, Divina and Torrent, Jordi. (2009). Media Education Policy: towards a Global Rationale. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001

  • Frau-Meigs, Divina, Kotilainen, Sirkku, Pathak-Shelak, Manisha, Hoechsmann, Michael, Poyntz, Stuart R. (2020). The Handbook of Media Education Research. Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Gallacher, Leslie Anne, & Gallagher, Michael. (2008). Methodological immaturity in childhood research?  Thinking through participatory methods'. Childhood, 15(4), 499-516. https://doi.org/10.1177/0907568208091672

  • Gee, James Paul. (2017). Affinity Spaces and 21st Century Learning. Educational Technology, 57(2). https://www.jstor.org/stable/4443052

  • Hoechsmann, Michael, & Poyntz, Stuart R. (2012). Media Literacies: A Critical Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Jagers, Robert  & Flanagan,  Constance (2022). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2020.1865613
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Polity Books

  • Lankshear, Colin, & Knobel, Michelle. (2013). A New Literacies Reader: Educational Perspectives. Peter Lang.

  • Livingstone, Sonia. and Sefton-Green, Julian. (2016). The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. NYU Press.

  • Masanet, Maria-Jose, Guerrero-Pico, Mar, and Establés, María-José. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2019.1641513

  • Morgan, Susan. (2018).  Fake News, Disinformation, Manipulation and Online Tactics to Undermine Democracy. Journal of Cyber Policy, 3, 39-43.https://doi.org/10.1080/23738871.2018.1462395

  • Pangrazio, Luci., & Sefton-Green, Julian. (2021). Digital Rights, Digital Citizenship and Digital Literacy: What's the Difference? Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 10(1), 15-27.  https://doi.org/10.7821/naer.2021.1.616

  • Pritzker, Suzanne, LaChapelle, Alicia, & Tatum, Jeremy. (2012). “We need their help”: Encouraging and discouraging adolescent civic engagement through photovoice. Children and Youth Services Review, 34(11), 2247–2254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.07.015

  • Sádaba, Charo, & Salaverría, Ramón. (2023). Tackling disinformation with media literacy: analysis of trends in the European Union. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 81, 17-33. https://www.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2023-1552

  • Scolari, Carlos (Ed.) (2018). Teens, Media and Collaborative Cultures. Exploiting Teens’ Transmedia Skills in the Classroom.. Barcelona: European Commission and Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

  • UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking Education: Towards a global common good? Retrieved from https://unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/RethinkingEducation.pdf

  • Wang, Caroline C. (2006). “Youth participation in photovoice as a strategy for community change”. Journal of Community Practice, 14(12), pp. 147- 161. https://doi.org/10.1300/J125v14n01_09

 

Recommended

  • Akom, Antwi, Shah, Aekta Nakai, Aaron, & Cruz, Tessa. (2016). Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) 2.0: how technological innovation and digital organizing sparked a food revolution in East Oakland. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 29(10), 1287-1307. https://doi.org/10.1080/09518398.2016.1201609

  • Bennet, Andy, & Robards, Brady. (2014). Mediated Youth Cultures. The Internet, Belonging and New Cultural Configurations. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Black, Joanna, Castro, Juan-Carlos, & Lin, Ching-Chiu. (2015). Youth practices in digital arts and new media: Learning in formal and informal settings. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. Yale University Press.

  • Brydon-Miller, Mary, & Maguire, Patricia. (2009). Participatory action research: contributions to the development of practitioner inquiry in education. Educational Action Research, 17, 79-93.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09650790802667469

  • Buckingham, David. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Polity Press.

  • Burgess, Jean, & Green, Joshua. (2009). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Polity Press. 

  • Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon, Meyers, Bente, Holm Sorensen, Brigitte. (2011). Serious Games in Education. A Global Perspective. Aarhus University Press.

  • Gee, James Paul (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Jenkins, Henry, Clinton Katie, et. al. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture : media education for the 21st century. The MIT Press 

  • Kress, Gunther. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. Routledge

  • Mateus, Julio César, Andrada Sola, Pablo., & Quiroz, María Teresa (2020). Media education in Latin America. Routledge.

  • Mihailidis, Paul. (2019). Civic Media Literacies: Reimagining GHuman Condition in an Age of Digital Abundance. Routledge. 

  • Potter, W. James (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462

  • Rosenbaum, Judith, E., Bonnet, Jennifer, L., Berry, R. Alan. (2021).  Beyond ‘fake news’: Opportunities and constraints for teaching news literacy. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 13(3), 153-159. https://doi.org/10.23860/JMLE-2021-13-3-16

  • UNESCO. (2013). Media and information literacy. Policy and strategy guidelines. Retrieved from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000225606

  •  Wang, Caroline, Burris, Mary Ann, & Yue Ping, Xiang (1996). “Chinese village women as visual anthropologists: A participatory approach to reaching policymakers”. Social Science & Medicine, 42(10), pp.1391– 1400. https://doi.org/10.1016/0277-9536(95)00287-1

 

Other resources


Academic Year: 2022/23

1015 - Màster Digital Culture and Emerging Media

32747 - New Media Literacies


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
801 - Masters Centre of the Department of Communication
Study:
1015 - Màster Digital Culture and Emerging Media
Subject:
32747 - New Media Literacies
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Teachers:
María del Mar Guerrero Pico, Mittzy Jennifer Arciniega Cáceres
Teaching Period:
Second quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Media literacy involves the relationship of two fields of study: education and communication. It has received different names in recent decades such as pedagogy of communication, educommunication, education for television, digital education, and more recently, media and information literacy (MIL). 

In this course we will introduce the students to this field of study through theoretical sessions, workshops and presentations. The aim of the course is to develop basic notions about media literacy, to understand its evolution and to develop the ability to design and produce materials to be applied in different contexts. It is important to highlight that, in recent years, the deep transformations in media ecology have propelled a total rethinking of traditional models of media literacy.

Throughout this subject, students will question and reassess the most traditional formulas in order to understand the concept of media literacy within the new media ecosystems. Grasping the multifaceted dimension of media literacy is essential to identify the mental mechanisms by which mass media and social media operate in order to exert influence on both audiences and users.

Associated skills

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC SKILLS 

  • Possess and understand knowledge that lays the groundwork or opportunity for being original in the development and/or application of ideas, often in a research context.

  • Apply the knowledge they have acquired and solve problems in new or little-known environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to their field of study.

  • Analyse the digital and emerging media, as well as the cultural phenomena around them, using a critical sociocultural perspective with suitable theoretical and methodological development.

  • Design, develop and assess a basic, applied or practice-based research process and transform the results into contributions that are of the interest of society.

  • Collaborate actively on teams to reach objectives shared with other individuals or organisations.

  • Develop the ability to assess inequalities on the basis of sex and gender in order to design solutions.

 

COURSE SPECIFIC SKILLS

  • Use the main theories, approaches and methodologies needed to analyse and assess digital culture and the emergence of new media.

  • Analyse digital culture and the emerging media and the practices associated with them, addressing their communicative, social, political, technological and economic dimensions.

  • Develop scholarly contents in different media and formats for both specialised and non specialised audiences.

  • Assess the potential of applying the theories, methodologies, concepts and results of one’s own research to underpin decision-making in the professional field.

  • Assess the current state of the scholarly study of digital culture and the new media, formulating hypotheses geared at conducting relevant research in the corresponding field or subfield.

Learning outcomes

  • Chooses appropriate theories and methodologies to study digital culture and the emerging media.

  • Applies the most relevant theories and methodologies according to the research objectives.

  • Uses a sociocultural perspective to analyse and interpret the texts, communicative/narrative forms and interaction formats characteristic of the digital environment and compares them appropriately with other media.

  • Analyses and assesses the experiences and cultural practices of users and audiences in the new media environment, paying attention to the interactive-participative dimension.

  • Compares, categorises and critically analyses interactive productions (both fiction and nonfiction) and digital works of art of all kinds.

  • Identifies and analyses the different dimensions (social, cultural, economic, political, technological) expressed and affected by the digital media and productions.

  • Appropriately applies contingency plans to deal with critical situations.

  • Appropriately assesses a research project from an ethical standpoint to identify potential risks, as well as the most suitable protocols to adopt (personal data management, subjects at risk, etc.).

  • Develops texts and documents associated with the different research phases (research project, interim report, poster, scholarly article, conference paper).

  •  Defends the research orally before a specialised audience.

Sustainable Development Goals

Goal 4: Achieve quality education in all stages of life and ensure equal access for the vulnerable.

Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Goal 10: Reduce inequalities and promote equal opportunity

Prerequisites

None.

Contents

Unit 1. What is Media Literacy?

  • Main theories and approaches to media literacy

  • The evolution of media literacy: from broadcasting to the digital age.

  • Media education competences

 

Unit 2. Applications of Media Literacy

  • Universal declarations on media literacy and digital citizenship

  • Legislating on media literacy: Spanish and European education laws

  • The pitfalls of media literacy policies

 

Unit 3. Trends and challenges in Media Literacy

  • Fandom and The New Literacies

  • Social media, videogames and informal learning spaces

  • Transmedia Literacy

  • The trouble with disinformation and infodemic

  • Youth inequalities and the digital gap

 

Unit 4. Researching Media Literacy

  • Main research methods used in media literacy projects: participatory action research and design-based research

  • Selected examples of national and international media literacy interventions

 

The definitive syllabus and class schedule will be available at Aula Global.

Teaching Methods

Throughout the course, different expositive and active learning methods are combined: master classes, individual and group readings, class debates, student presentations, workshops, video screenings, and especially, learning through research/action projects. 

Every week, students will be required to read the texts corresponding to each session so that there will always be a common topic for discussion and participation in the different learning activities.

Evaluation

The assessment of the course is composed of three elements, as detailed in the following table:

 

Item to assess

Type

Weigh (%)

Midterm assignment  

Individual

30%

Research/action project on media literacy

Group

60%

Participation in weekly activities (individual reading, group work, etc.) in the classroom.

Individual

10% 



 

NOTE: The final mark will be the sum of the three items. Students must achieve a  minimum 5/10 mark in all items in order to pass the course.

Course attendance: Students must attend at least 80% of the sessions. More than 2 missed sessions must be properly justified. Whenever a student is absent for unknown reasons for more than two sessions, the instructors will penalise their final grade with -1 for each unexcused absence.

 

 

Bibliography and information resources

Basic

  • Buckingham, David. (2019). The Media Education Manifesto. Polity Press.

  • Bulger, Monica and Davison, Patrick. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute. Retrieved from https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Media_Literacy_2018.pdf

  • Dedding, Christine, Goedhart, Nicole, S., Broerse, Jacqueline E.W.  &  Abma (2021). Exploring the boundaries of ‘good’ Participatory Action Research in times of increasing popularity: dealing with constraints in local policy for digital inclusion. Educational Action Research, 29(1), 20-36. 10.1080/09650792.2020.1743733

  • Epstein, Iris, Stevens, Bonnie, McKeever, Patricia, Baruchel, Sylvain, & Jones, Heather. (2008). Using puppetry to elicit children's talk for research. Nursing Inquiry, 15(1), 49–56. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1800.2008.00395.x

  • Ferrés, Joan and Piscitelli, Alejandro. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08

  • Frau-Meigs, Divina and Torrent, Jordi. (2009). Media Education Policy: towards a Global Rationale. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001

  • Frau-Meigs, Divina, Kotilainen, Sirkku, Pathak-Shelak, Manisha, Hoechsmann, Michael, Poyntz, Stuart R. (2020). The Handbook of Media Education Research. Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Gallacher, Leslie Anne, & Gallagher, Michael. (2008). Methodological immaturity in childhood research?  Thinking through participatory methods'. Childhood, 15(4), 499-516. https://doi.org/10.1177/0907568208091672

  • Gee, James Paul. (2017). Affinity Spaces and 21st Century Learning. Educational Technology, 57(2). https://www.jstor.org/stable/4443052

  • Hoechsmann, Michael, & Poyntz, Stuart R. (2012). Media Literacies: A Critical Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Jagers, Robert  & Flanagan,  Constance (2022). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2020.1865613
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Polity Books

  • Lankshear, Colin, & Knobel, Michelle. (2013). A New Literacies Reader: Educational Perspectives. Peter Lang.

  • Livingstone, Sonia. and Sefton-Green, Julian. (2016). The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. NYU Press.

  • Masanet, Maria-Jose, Guerrero-Pico, Mar, and Establés, María-José. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2019.1641513

  • Morgan, Susan. (2018).  Fake News, Disinformation, Manipulation and Online Tactics to Undermine Democracy. Journal of Cyber Policy, 3, 39-43.https://doi.org/10.1080/23738871.2018.1462395

  • Pangrazio, Luci., & Sefton-Green, Julian. (2021). Digital Rights, Digital Citizenship and Digital Literacy: What's the Difference? Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 10(1), 15-27.  https://doi.org/10.7821/naer.2021.1.616

  • Pritzker, Suzanne, LaChapelle, Alicia, & Tatum, Jeremy. (2012). “We need their help”: Encouraging and discouraging adolescent civic engagement through photovoice. Children and Youth Services Review, 34(11), 2247–2254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.07.015

  • Sádaba, Charo, & Salaverría, Ramón. (2023). Tackling disinformation with media literacy: analysis of trends in the European Union. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 81, 17-33. https://www.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2023-1552

  • Scolari, Carlos (Ed.) (2018). Teens, Media and Collaborative Cultures. Exploiting Teens’ Transmedia Skills in the Classroom.. Barcelona: European Commission and Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

  • UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking Education: Towards a global common good? Retrieved from https://unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/RethinkingEducation.pdf

  • Wang, Caroline C. (2006). “Youth participation in photovoice as a strategy for community change”. Journal of Community Practice, 14(12), pp. 147- 161. https://doi.org/10.1300/J125v14n01_09

 

Recommended

  • Akom, Antwi, Shah, Aekta Nakai, Aaron, & Cruz, Tessa. (2016). Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) 2.0: how technological innovation and digital organizing sparked a food revolution in East Oakland. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 29(10), 1287-1307. https://doi.org/10.1080/09518398.2016.1201609

  • Bennet, Andy, & Robards, Brady. (2014). Mediated Youth Cultures. The Internet, Belonging and New Cultural Configurations. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Black, Joanna, Castro, Juan-Carlos, & Lin, Ching-Chiu. (2015). Youth practices in digital arts and new media: Learning in formal and informal settings. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. Yale University Press.

  • Brydon-Miller, Mary, & Maguire, Patricia. (2009). Participatory action research: contributions to the development of practitioner inquiry in education. Educational Action Research, 17, 79-93.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09650790802667469

  • Buckingham, David. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Polity Press.

  • Burgess, Jean, & Green, Joshua. (2009). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Polity Press. 

  • Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon, Meyers, Bente, Holm Sorensen, Brigitte. (2011). Serious Games in Education. A Global Perspective. Aarhus University Press.

  • Gee, James Paul (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Jenkins, Henry, Clinton Katie, et. al. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture : media education for the 21st century. The MIT Press 

  • Kress, Gunther. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. Routledge

  • Mateus, Julio César, Andrada Sola, Pablo., & Quiroz, María Teresa (2020). Media education in Latin America. Routledge.

  • Mihailidis, Paul. (2019). Civic Media Literacies: Reimagining GHuman Condition in an Age of Digital Abundance. Routledge. 

  • Potter, W. James (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462

  • Rosenbaum, Judith, E., Bonnet, Jennifer, L., Berry, R. Alan. (2021).  Beyond ‘fake news’: Opportunities and constraints for teaching news literacy. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 13(3), 153-159. https://doi.org/10.23860/JMLE-2021-13-3-16

  • UNESCO. (2013). Media and information literacy. Policy and strategy guidelines. Retrieved from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000225606

  •  Wang, Caroline, Burris, Mary Ann, & Yue Ping, Xiang (1996). “Chinese village women as visual anthropologists: A participatory approach to reaching policymakers”. Social Science & Medicine, 42(10), pp.1391– 1400. https://doi.org/10.1016/0277-9536(95)00287-1

 

Other resources


Academic Year: 2022/23

1015 - Màster Digital Culture and Emerging Media

32747 - New Media Literacies


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
801 - Masters Centre of the Department of Communication
Study:
1015 - Màster Digital Culture and Emerging Media
Subject:
32747 - New Media Literacies
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Teachers:
María del Mar Guerrero Pico, Mittzy Jennifer Arciniega Cáceres
Teaching Period:
Second quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Media literacy involves the relationship of two fields of study: education and communication. It has received different names in recent decades such as pedagogy of communication, educommunication, education for television, digital education, and more recently, media and information literacy (MIL). 

In this course we will introduce the students to this field of study through theoretical sessions, workshops and presentations. The aim of the course is to develop basic notions about media literacy, to understand its evolution and to develop the ability to design and produce materials to be applied in different contexts. It is important to highlight that, in recent years, the deep transformations in media ecology have propelled a total rethinking of traditional models of media literacy.

Throughout this subject, students will question and reassess the most traditional formulas in order to understand the concept of media literacy within the new media ecosystems. Grasping the multifaceted dimension of media literacy is essential to identify the mental mechanisms by which mass media and social media operate in order to exert influence on both audiences and users.

Associated skills

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC SKILLS 

  • Possess and understand knowledge that lays the groundwork or opportunity for being original in the development and/or application of ideas, often in a research context.

  • Apply the knowledge they have acquired and solve problems in new or little-known environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to their field of study.

  • Analyse the digital and emerging media, as well as the cultural phenomena around them, using a critical sociocultural perspective with suitable theoretical and methodological development.

  • Design, develop and assess a basic, applied or practice-based research process and transform the results into contributions that are of the interest of society.

  • Collaborate actively on teams to reach objectives shared with other individuals or organisations.

  • Develop the ability to assess inequalities on the basis of sex and gender in order to design solutions.

 

COURSE SPECIFIC SKILLS

  • Use the main theories, approaches and methodologies needed to analyse and assess digital culture and the emergence of new media.

  • Analyse digital culture and the emerging media and the practices associated with them, addressing their communicative, social, political, technological and economic dimensions.

  • Develop scholarly contents in different media and formats for both specialised and non specialised audiences.

  • Assess the potential of applying the theories, methodologies, concepts and results of one’s own research to underpin decision-making in the professional field.

  • Assess the current state of the scholarly study of digital culture and the new media, formulating hypotheses geared at conducting relevant research in the corresponding field or subfield.

Learning outcomes

  • Chooses appropriate theories and methodologies to study digital culture and the emerging media.

  • Applies the most relevant theories and methodologies according to the research objectives.

  • Uses a sociocultural perspective to analyse and interpret the texts, communicative/narrative forms and interaction formats characteristic of the digital environment and compares them appropriately with other media.

  • Analyses and assesses the experiences and cultural practices of users and audiences in the new media environment, paying attention to the interactive-participative dimension.

  • Compares, categorises and critically analyses interactive productions (both fiction and nonfiction) and digital works of art of all kinds.

  • Identifies and analyses the different dimensions (social, cultural, economic, political, technological) expressed and affected by the digital media and productions.

  • Appropriately applies contingency plans to deal with critical situations.

  • Appropriately assesses a research project from an ethical standpoint to identify potential risks, as well as the most suitable protocols to adopt (personal data management, subjects at risk, etc.).

  • Develops texts and documents associated with the different research phases (research project, interim report, poster, scholarly article, conference paper).

  •  Defends the research orally before a specialised audience.

Sustainable Development Goals

Goal 4: Achieve quality education in all stages of life and ensure equal access for the vulnerable.

Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Goal 10: Reduce inequalities and promote equal opportunity

Prerequisites

None.

Contents

Unit 1. What is Media Literacy?

  • Main theories and approaches to media literacy

  • The evolution of media literacy: from broadcasting to the digital age.

  • Media education competences

 

Unit 2. Applications of Media Literacy

  • Universal declarations on media literacy and digital citizenship

  • Legislating on media literacy: Spanish and European education laws

  • The pitfalls of media literacy policies

 

Unit 3. Trends and challenges in Media Literacy

  • Fandom and The New Literacies

  • Social media, videogames and informal learning spaces

  • Transmedia Literacy

  • The trouble with disinformation and infodemic

  • Youth inequalities and the digital gap

 

Unit 4. Researching Media Literacy

  • Main research methods used in media literacy projects: participatory action research and design-based research

  • Selected examples of national and international media literacy interventions

 

The definitive syllabus and class schedule will be available at Aula Global.

Teaching Methods

Throughout the course, different expositive and active learning methods are combined: master classes, individual and group readings, class debates, student presentations, workshops, video screenings, and especially, learning through research/action projects. 

Every week, students will be required to read the texts corresponding to each session so that there will always be a common topic for discussion and participation in the different learning activities.

Evaluation

The assessment of the course is composed of three elements, as detailed in the following table:

 

Item to assess

Type

Weigh (%)

Midterm assignment  

Individual

30%

Research/action project on media literacy

Group

60%

Participation in weekly activities (individual reading, group work, etc.) in the classroom.

Individual

10% 



 

NOTE: The final mark will be the sum of the three items. Students must achieve a  minimum 5/10 mark in all items in order to pass the course.

Course attendance: Students must attend at least 80% of the sessions. More than 2 missed sessions must be properly justified. Whenever a student is absent for unknown reasons for more than two sessions, the instructors will penalise their final grade with -1 for each unexcused absence.

 

 

Bibliography and information resources

Basic

  • Buckingham, David. (2019). The Media Education Manifesto. Polity Press.

  • Bulger, Monica and Davison, Patrick. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute. Retrieved from https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Media_Literacy_2018.pdf

  • Dedding, Christine, Goedhart, Nicole, S., Broerse, Jacqueline E.W.  &  Abma (2021). Exploring the boundaries of ‘good’ Participatory Action Research in times of increasing popularity: dealing with constraints in local policy for digital inclusion. Educational Action Research, 29(1), 20-36. 10.1080/09650792.2020.1743733

  • Epstein, Iris, Stevens, Bonnie, McKeever, Patricia, Baruchel, Sylvain, & Jones, Heather. (2008). Using puppetry to elicit children's talk for research. Nursing Inquiry, 15(1), 49–56. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1800.2008.00395.x

  • Ferrés, Joan and Piscitelli, Alejandro. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08

  • Frau-Meigs, Divina and Torrent, Jordi. (2009). Media Education Policy: towards a Global Rationale. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001

  • Frau-Meigs, Divina, Kotilainen, Sirkku, Pathak-Shelak, Manisha, Hoechsmann, Michael, Poyntz, Stuart R. (2020). The Handbook of Media Education Research. Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Gallacher, Leslie Anne, & Gallagher, Michael. (2008). Methodological immaturity in childhood research?  Thinking through participatory methods'. Childhood, 15(4), 499-516. https://doi.org/10.1177/0907568208091672

  • Gee, James Paul. (2017). Affinity Spaces and 21st Century Learning. Educational Technology, 57(2). https://www.jstor.org/stable/4443052

  • Hoechsmann, Michael, & Poyntz, Stuart R. (2012). Media Literacies: A Critical Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Jagers, Robert  & Flanagan,  Constance (2022). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2020.1865613
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Polity Books

  • Lankshear, Colin, & Knobel, Michelle. (2013). A New Literacies Reader: Educational Perspectives. Peter Lang.

  • Livingstone, Sonia. and Sefton-Green, Julian. (2016). The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. NYU Press.

  • Masanet, Maria-Jose, Guerrero-Pico, Mar, and Establés, María-José. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2019.1641513

  • Morgan, Susan. (2018).  Fake News, Disinformation, Manipulation and Online Tactics to Undermine Democracy. Journal of Cyber Policy, 3, 39-43.https://doi.org/10.1080/23738871.2018.1462395

  • Pangrazio, Luci., & Sefton-Green, Julian. (2021). Digital Rights, Digital Citizenship and Digital Literacy: What's the Difference? Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 10(1), 15-27.  https://doi.org/10.7821/naer.2021.1.616

  • Pritzker, Suzanne, LaChapelle, Alicia, & Tatum, Jeremy. (2012). “We need their help”: Encouraging and discouraging adolescent civic engagement through photovoice. Children and Youth Services Review, 34(11), 2247–2254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.07.015

  • Sádaba, Charo, & Salaverría, Ramón. (2023). Tackling disinformation with media literacy: analysis of trends in the European Union. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 81, 17-33. https://www.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2023-1552

  • Scolari, Carlos (Ed.) (2018). Teens, Media and Collaborative Cultures. Exploiting Teens’ Transmedia Skills in the Classroom.. Barcelona: European Commission and Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

  • UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking Education: Towards a global common good? Retrieved from https://unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/RethinkingEducation.pdf

  • Wang, Caroline C. (2006). “Youth participation in photovoice as a strategy for community change”. Journal of Community Practice, 14(12), pp. 147- 161. https://doi.org/10.1300/J125v14n01_09

 

Recommended

  • Akom, Antwi, Shah, Aekta Nakai, Aaron, & Cruz, Tessa. (2016). Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) 2.0: how technological innovation and digital organizing sparked a food revolution in East Oakland. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 29(10), 1287-1307. https://doi.org/10.1080/09518398.2016.1201609

  • Bennet, Andy, & Robards, Brady. (2014). Mediated Youth Cultures. The Internet, Belonging and New Cultural Configurations. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Black, Joanna, Castro, Juan-Carlos, & Lin, Ching-Chiu. (2015). Youth practices in digital arts and new media: Learning in formal and informal settings. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. Yale University Press.

  • Brydon-Miller, Mary, & Maguire, Patricia. (2009). Participatory action research: contributions to the development of practitioner inquiry in education. Educational Action Research, 17, 79-93.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09650790802667469

  • Buckingham, David. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Polity Press.

  • Burgess, Jean, & Green, Joshua. (2009). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Polity Press. 

  • Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon, Meyers, Bente, Holm Sorensen, Brigitte. (2011). Serious Games in Education. A Global Perspective. Aarhus University Press.

  • Gee, James Paul (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Jenkins, Henry, Clinton Katie, et. al. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture : media education for the 21st century. The MIT Press 

  • Kress, Gunther. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. Routledge

  • Mateus, Julio César, Andrada Sola, Pablo., & Quiroz, María Teresa (2020). Media education in Latin America. Routledge.

  • Mihailidis, Paul. (2019). Civic Media Literacies: Reimagining GHuman Condition in an Age of Digital Abundance. Routledge. 

  • Potter, W. James (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462

  • Rosenbaum, Judith, E., Bonnet, Jennifer, L., Berry, R. Alan. (2021).  Beyond ‘fake news’: Opportunities and constraints for teaching news literacy. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 13(3), 153-159. https://doi.org/10.23860/JMLE-2021-13-3-16

  • UNESCO. (2013). Media and information literacy. Policy and strategy guidelines. Retrieved from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000225606

  •  Wang, Caroline, Burris, Mary Ann, & Yue Ping, Xiang (1996). “Chinese village women as visual anthropologists: A participatory approach to reaching policymakers”. Social Science & Medicine, 42(10), pp.1391– 1400. https://doi.org/10.1016/0277-9536(95)00287-1

 

Other resources