Consulta de Guies Docents



Academic Year/course: 2022/23

8086 - Master in AsianPacific Studies in a Global Context

32369 - Asia in the Global Economy


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
808 - Masters Centre of Humanities of the Deparment of Humanities
Study:
8086 - Master in AsianPacific Studies in a Global Context
Subject:
32369 - Asia in the Global Economy
Credits:
5.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Guillermo Martinez Taberner
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The Asia-Pacific region accounts not only for more than 60% of the world's population, but also for 40% of the world economy and will account for 60% of the economic growth in the coming years. This "rise", "miracle", "boom" of Asia is not an anomaly from a longstanding historical perspective, nor it is so in view of the economic factors available to the countries of the region. Over the last few decades, the number of countries that have joined the so-called "Asian growth model" has been increasing, from Japan to China, passing through South Korea and now reaching some countries in Southeast Asia. The centre of the world economy's gravity has shifted from the West to the Asia- Pacific region. This process must be analyzed from a historical, comparative, transdisciplinary and global perspective, in order to understand for instance the transformations of trade relations on a global scale, the problems it generates and the opportunities for economic cooperation with the countries of the region.

Associated skills

General Skills: CG1, CG2, CB1, CB2, CB3 y CB5

Transversal Sills: CT1

Specific Skills: CE1, CE2, CE6, CE8

Sustainable Development Goals

SDG 5 Gender Equality

SDG 10 Reduced inequalities

SDG 13 Climate change

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course

Contents

Part I   - Asian Economic Growth in Historical Context

  1. Introduction: Asia and the Global Economy in Historical Perspective
  2. Economic Changes and the Global Power Shift
  3. Origins of Industrialization in East Asia 

Part II  - Lessons from the East Asian Model

  1. The East Asian Model of Economic Development
  2. The Emergence of China and Its Global Impact 
  3. Asia and the Global Trade

Part III - Globalization and Economic Growth in Asia

  1. The Great Convergence
  2. Asia's Economic Challenges 
  3. Economic and Business Opportunities 

Teaching Methods

This course consists of a mixture of lecture and seminar.

  • Each class includes lecture, readings and discussion. The lectures are designed to provide students with background information necessary for thoughtful discussion and engagement with the assigned readings.
  • Secondly, there will be seminars followed by class discussions and additional written assignments.

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

Class participation (25%)

This portion of the grade takes into account: attendance and punctuality; familiarity with, and reflection on, the assigned readings; and active and thoughtful participation in class discussions.

Seminar presentations and assignments (75%)

Presentations will be held in class and will last 15 minutes. The format of the short written assignments will be in standard essay form with notes and bibliography. Further information will be provided on the seminar and paper requirements.

Bibliography and information resources

Ando A. & Kimura, F. (2003): “The Formation of International Production and Distribution Networks in East Asia”. NBER (núm. 10167).

Andreas, Joel (2010): “A Shanghai model ? On capitalism with Chinese characteristics”. New Left Review 65: 63-85.

Alexander, Arthur (2007): The Arc of Japan’s Economic Development. New York: Routledge.  

Arrighi, Giovanni (2007): Adam Smith en Pekín. Orígenes y fundamentos del siglo XXI. Madrid: Akal.

Brandt, Loren & Rawski Thomas G., eds. (2008): China's Great Economic Transformation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bray, Francesca (1986): The Rice Economies. Technology & Development in Asian Societies. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Chen, Chunlai. Ed. (2009): China’s Integration with the Global Economy. WTO Accession. Foreign Investment and International Trade. London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Feenstra, Robert C. & Wei, Shang-jin, eds. (2010): China’s Growing role in World Trade. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Francks, Penny (2016): Japan and the Great Divergence: A Short Guide. UK: Palgrave.

Feuerwerker, Albert (1995): The Chinese Economy, 1870-1949. Michigan: An Arbor Center for Chinese Studies.

García-Herrero Alicia & Ng, Gary (2021): "China’s State Owned Enterprises  and Competitive Neutrality", in World Economics, Vol. 22, No. 1.

Hamashita, Takeshi (2008): China, East Asia and the Global Economy: Regional and Historical Perspectives. New York: Routledge.

Huang, Yasheng (2008): Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics. Entrepreneurship and the State. Cambridge University Press.

Hung, Ho-fung (2009): “America’s head servant? The PRC dilemma in the global crisis”. New Left Review, 60: 5-25.

Hung, Ho-fung (ed.) (2009): China and the Transformation of Global Capitalism, The John Hopkins University Press.

Jacques, Martin (2009): When China Rules the World. London: Allen Lane.

Ka, Zeng, ed. (2007): China’s Foreign Trade Policy. The New Constituencies. New York: Routledge.

Kirby, William C. (2006): “China's Internationalization in the Early People's Republic: Dreams of a Socialist World Economy”. The China Quarterly 188, pp. 870-890.

Kojima, K. (2000): “The Flying gees model of Asian Economic Development: Origin, Theoretical Extensions and Regional Policy Implications”. Journal of Asian Economics, 11: 375-401.

Maddison, Angus (1998): Chinese Economic Performance in the Long Run. Paris: OECD Development Centre.

Mosk, Carl (2008): Japanese Economic Development: Markets, Norms, Structures. USA: Routledge.

Naughton, Barry (1997): The China circle: Economic and Technology in the PRC, Taiwan and Hongkong. Washington: Brookings Institution Press.

Naughton, Barry (2007): The Chinese Economy. Transitions and Growth. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Lardy, Nicholas (2012):Sustaining China's Economic Growth After the Global Financial Crisis. Washington:  Peterson Institute for International.

Lardy, Nicholas (2002): Integration China into the Global Economy. Washington: Brookings Institution Press.

Lardy, Nicholas (1987): ‘Economic recovery and the 1st Five-Year Plan’. En MacFarquhar, Roderick y Fairbank, John King (eds.): The Cambridge History of China. Volume 14. The People’s Republic, Part 1: The emergence of revolutionary China, 1949-1965. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 144-184.

Leonard, Mark (2008): What Does China Think?. London: Fourth Estate.

Leonard, Mark (2012): China 3.0. London: European Council on Foreign Relations.

Lo, Vai & Tian, Xiaowen (2009): Law and Foreign Business and Investment in China. New York: Routledge.

Lu, Aiguo (2000): China and the global economy since 1840. Helsinki: UNU/Wider.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2000): The Great Divergence. China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy. Princeton University Press.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2001): “Is there an east Asian development path? Long-term comparisons, constraints, and continuities”. The Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 44 (3): 322-362.

Pomeranz, Kenneth & Topik, Steven (2006): The World that Trade Created. Society, Culture and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present. New York: M. E. Sharpe.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2008): “Chinese Development in Long-run Perspective”. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 152 (1): 83-100.

Rawksi, Thomas G. & LI, Lillian M. (eds.) (1992): Chinese History in Economic Perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Richardson, Philip (1999): Economic Change in China, c. 1800-1950. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Saito, Osamu (2010): “An industrious revolution in an East Asian market economy? Tokugawa Japan and implications for the Great Divergence”. Australian Economic History Review. 50. 240-261.

Shambaugh, David (2013): China Goes Global: The Partial Power. New York: Oxford University Press.  

Shiue, Carol, Keller, Wolfgang & Li, Ben (2010): “China’s Foreign Trade. Perspectives from the Past 150 years”. NBER Working Papers 16550.

Soler Matutes, J. (2008). El Milagro económico chino: mito y realidad. Barcelona: Marcial Pons.

Sugihara, Kaoru (2007): “The Second Noel Butlin lecture: Labour-Intensive Industrialisation in Global History”. Australian Economic History Review 47 (2): 121-154.

Sugihara, Kaoru (Ed.) (2005): Japan, China and the Growth of the Asian International Economy, 1850-1949. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Sugihara, Kaoru (2004): “The state and the industrious revolution in Tokugawa Japan”. Working Papers of the Global Economic History Network (GEHN), 02/04. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Wing, Chung-ho (2008): “Building up Modernity? The Changing Spatial Representations of State Power in a Chinese Socialist ‘Model community’”. Modern Asian Studies 42 (6): 1137-1171.

Woo, Wing Thye (1999): “The Real Reasons for China’s Growth”. The China Journal  41: 115-137.

Wu, Chengming & Xu, Dixin (eds.) (2000): Chinese Capitalism, 1522-1840. London: MacMillan Press Ltd.

Wu, Jinglian (1999). Understanding and Interpreting Chinese Economic Reform. (2005) Mason (Ohio): Texere.

Yueh, Linda (2013): China's Growth: The Making of an Economic Superpower, Oxford: OUP. 

Yueh, Linda (2011): Enterprising China: Business, Economic, and Legal Development since 1979, Oxford: OUP. 

 


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

8086 - Master in AsianPacific Studies in a Global Context

32369 - Asia in the Global Economy


Informaciķ de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
808 - Masters Centre of Humanities of the Deparment of Humanities
Study:
8086 - Master in AsianPacific Studies in a Global Context
Subject:
32369 - Asia in the Global Economy
Credits:
5.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Guillermo Martinez Taberner
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The Asia-Pacific region accounts not only for more than 60% of the world's population, but also for 40% of the world economy and will account for 60% of the economic growth in the coming years. This "rise", "miracle", "boom" of Asia is not an anomaly from a longstanding historical perspective, nor it is so in view of the economic factors available to the countries of the region. Over the last few decades, the number of countries that have joined the so-called "Asian growth model" has been increasing, from Japan to China, passing through South Korea and now reaching some countries in Southeast Asia. The centre of the world economy's gravity has shifted from the West to the Asia- Pacific region. This process must be analyzed from a historical, comparative, transdisciplinary and global perspective, in order to understand for instance the transformations of trade relations on a global scale, the problems it generates and the opportunities for economic cooperation with the countries of the region.

Associated skills

General Skills: CG1, CG2, CB1, CB2, CB3 y CB5

Transversal Sills: CT1

Specific Skills: CE1, CE2, CE6, CE8

Sustainable Development Goals

SDG 5 Gender Equality

SDG 10 Reduced inequalities

SDG 13 Climate change

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course

Contents

Part I   - Asian Economic Growth in Historical Context

  1. Introduction: Asia and the Global Economy in Historical Perspective
  2. Economic Changes and the Global Power Shift
  3. Origins of Industrialization in East Asia 

Part II  - Lessons from the East Asian Model

  1. The East Asian Model of Economic Development
  2. The Emergence of China and Its Global Impact 
  3. Asia and the Global Trade

Part III - Globalization and Economic Growth in Asia

  1. The Great Convergence
  2. Asia's Economic Challenges 
  3. Economic and Business Opportunities 

Teaching Methods

This course consists of a mixture of lecture and seminar.

  • Each class includes lecture, readings and discussion. The lectures are designed to provide students with background information necessary for thoughtful discussion and engagement with the assigned readings.
  • Secondly, there will be seminars followed by class discussions and additional written assignments.

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

Class participation (25%)

This portion of the grade takes into account: attendance and punctuality; familiarity with, and reflection on, the assigned readings; and active and thoughtful participation in class discussions.

Seminar presentations and assignments (75%)

Presentations will be held in class and will last 15 minutes. The format of the short written assignments will be in standard essay form with notes and bibliography. Further information will be provided on the seminar and paper requirements.

Bibliography and information resources

Ando A. & Kimura, F. (2003): “The Formation of International Production and Distribution Networks in East Asia”. NBER (núm. 10167).

Andreas, Joel (2010): “A Shanghai model ? On capitalism with Chinese characteristics”. New Left Review 65: 63-85.

Alexander, Arthur (2007): The Arc of Japan’s Economic Development. New York: Routledge.  

Arrighi, Giovanni (2007): Adam Smith en Pekín. Orígenes y fundamentos del siglo XXI. Madrid: Akal.

Brandt, Loren & Rawski Thomas G., eds. (2008): China's Great Economic Transformation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bray, Francesca (1986): The Rice Economies. Technology & Development in Asian Societies. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Chen, Chunlai. Ed. (2009): China’s Integration with the Global Economy. WTO Accession. Foreign Investment and International Trade. London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Feenstra, Robert C. & Wei, Shang-jin, eds. (2010): China’s Growing role in World Trade. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Francks, Penny (2016): Japan and the Great Divergence: A Short Guide. UK: Palgrave.

Feuerwerker, Albert (1995): The Chinese Economy, 1870-1949. Michigan: An Arbor Center for Chinese Studies.

García-Herrero Alicia & Ng, Gary (2021): "China’s State Owned Enterprises  and Competitive Neutrality", in World Economics, Vol. 22, No. 1.

Hamashita, Takeshi (2008): China, East Asia and the Global Economy: Regional and Historical Perspectives. New York: Routledge.

Huang, Yasheng (2008): Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics. Entrepreneurship and the State. Cambridge University Press.

Hung, Ho-fung (2009): “America’s head servant? The PRC dilemma in the global crisis”. New Left Review, 60: 5-25.

Hung, Ho-fung (ed.) (2009): China and the Transformation of Global Capitalism, The John Hopkins University Press.

Jacques, Martin (2009): When China Rules the World. London: Allen Lane.

Ka, Zeng, ed. (2007): China’s Foreign Trade Policy. The New Constituencies. New York: Routledge.

Kirby, William C. (2006): “China's Internationalization in the Early People's Republic: Dreams of a Socialist World Economy”. The China Quarterly 188, pp. 870-890.

Kojima, K. (2000): “The Flying gees model of Asian Economic Development: Origin, Theoretical Extensions and Regional Policy Implications”. Journal of Asian Economics, 11: 375-401.

Maddison, Angus (1998): Chinese Economic Performance in the Long Run. Paris: OECD Development Centre.

Mosk, Carl (2008): Japanese Economic Development: Markets, Norms, Structures. USA: Routledge.

Naughton, Barry (1997): The China circle: Economic and Technology in the PRC, Taiwan and Hongkong. Washington: Brookings Institution Press.

Naughton, Barry (2007): The Chinese Economy. Transitions and Growth. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Lardy, Nicholas (2012):Sustaining China's Economic Growth After the Global Financial Crisis. Washington:  Peterson Institute for International.

Lardy, Nicholas (2002): Integration China into the Global Economy. Washington: Brookings Institution Press.

Lardy, Nicholas (1987): ‘Economic recovery and the 1st Five-Year Plan’. En MacFarquhar, Roderick y Fairbank, John King (eds.): The Cambridge History of China. Volume 14. The People’s Republic, Part 1: The emergence of revolutionary China, 1949-1965. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 144-184.

Leonard, Mark (2008): What Does China Think?. London: Fourth Estate.

Leonard, Mark (2012): China 3.0. London: European Council on Foreign Relations.

Lo, Vai & Tian, Xiaowen (2009): Law and Foreign Business and Investment in China. New York: Routledge.

Lu, Aiguo (2000): China and the global economy since 1840. Helsinki: UNU/Wider.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2000): The Great Divergence. China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy. Princeton University Press.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2001): “Is there an east Asian development path? Long-term comparisons, constraints, and continuities”. The Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 44 (3): 322-362.

Pomeranz, Kenneth & Topik, Steven (2006): The World that Trade Created. Society, Culture and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present. New York: M. E. Sharpe.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2008): “Chinese Development in Long-run Perspective”. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 152 (1): 83-100.

Rawksi, Thomas G. & LI, Lillian M. (eds.) (1992): Chinese History in Economic Perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Richardson, Philip (1999): Economic Change in China, c. 1800-1950. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Saito, Osamu (2010): “An industrious revolution in an East Asian market economy? Tokugawa Japan and implications for the Great Divergence”. Australian Economic History Review. 50. 240-261.

Shambaugh, David (2013): China Goes Global: The Partial Power. New York: Oxford University Press.  

Shiue, Carol, Keller, Wolfgang & Li, Ben (2010): “China’s Foreign Trade. Perspectives from the Past 150 years”. NBER Working Papers 16550.

Soler Matutes, J. (2008). El Milagro económico chino: mito y realidad. Barcelona: Marcial Pons.

Sugihara, Kaoru (2007): “The Second Noel Butlin lecture: Labour-Intensive Industrialisation in Global History”. Australian Economic History Review 47 (2): 121-154.

Sugihara, Kaoru (Ed.) (2005): Japan, China and the Growth of the Asian International Economy, 1850-1949. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Sugihara, Kaoru (2004): “The state and the industrious revolution in Tokugawa Japan”. Working Papers of the Global Economic History Network (GEHN), 02/04. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Wing, Chung-ho (2008): “Building up Modernity? The Changing Spatial Representations of State Power in a Chinese Socialist ‘Model community’”. Modern Asian Studies 42 (6): 1137-1171.

Woo, Wing Thye (1999): “The Real Reasons for China’s Growth”. The China Journal  41: 115-137.

Wu, Chengming & Xu, Dixin (eds.) (2000): Chinese Capitalism, 1522-1840. London: MacMillan Press Ltd.

Wu, Jinglian (1999). Understanding and Interpreting Chinese Economic Reform. (2005) Mason (Ohio): Texere.

Yueh, Linda (2013): China's Growth: The Making of an Economic Superpower, Oxford: OUP. 

Yueh, Linda (2011): Enterprising China: Business, Economic, and Legal Development since 1979, Oxford: OUP. 

 


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

8086 - Master in AsianPacific Studies in a Global Context

32369 - Asia in the Global Economy


Informaciķn de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
808 - Masters Centre of Humanities of the Deparment of Humanities
Study:
8086 - Master in AsianPacific Studies in a Global Context
Subject:
32369 - Asia in the Global Economy
Credits:
5.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Guillermo Martinez Taberner
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The Asia-Pacific region accounts not only for more than 60% of the world's population, but also for 40% of the world economy and will account for 60% of the economic growth in the coming years. This "rise", "miracle", "boom" of Asia is not an anomaly from a longstanding historical perspective, nor it is so in view of the economic factors available to the countries of the region. Over the last few decades, the number of countries that have joined the so-called "Asian growth model" has been increasing, from Japan to China, passing through South Korea and now reaching some countries in Southeast Asia. The centre of the world economy's gravity has shifted from the West to the Asia- Pacific region. This process must be analyzed from a historical, comparative, transdisciplinary and global perspective, in order to understand for instance the transformations of trade relations on a global scale, the problems it generates and the opportunities for economic cooperation with the countries of the region.

Associated skills

General Skills: CG1, CG2, CB1, CB2, CB3 y CB5

Transversal Sills: CT1

Specific Skills: CE1, CE2, CE6, CE8

Sustainable Development Goals

SDG 5 Gender Equality

SDG 10 Reduced inequalities

SDG 13 Climate change

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course

Contents

Part I   - Asian Economic Growth in Historical Context

  1. Introduction: Asia and the Global Economy in Historical Perspective
  2. Economic Changes and the Global Power Shift
  3. Origins of Industrialization in East Asia 

Part II  - Lessons from the East Asian Model

  1. The East Asian Model of Economic Development
  2. The Emergence of China and Its Global Impact 
  3. Asia and the Global Trade

Part III - Globalization and Economic Growth in Asia

  1. The Great Convergence
  2. Asia's Economic Challenges 
  3. Economic and Business Opportunities 

Teaching Methods

This course consists of a mixture of lecture and seminar.

  • Each class includes lecture, readings and discussion. The lectures are designed to provide students with background information necessary for thoughtful discussion and engagement with the assigned readings.
  • Secondly, there will be seminars followed by class discussions and additional written assignments.

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

Class participation (25%)

This portion of the grade takes into account: attendance and punctuality; familiarity with, and reflection on, the assigned readings; and active and thoughtful participation in class discussions.

Seminar presentations and assignments (75%)

Presentations will be held in class and will last 15 minutes. The format of the short written assignments will be in standard essay form with notes and bibliography. Further information will be provided on the seminar and paper requirements.

Bibliography and information resources

Ando A. & Kimura, F. (2003): “The Formation of International Production and Distribution Networks in East Asia”. NBER (núm. 10167).

Andreas, Joel (2010): “A Shanghai model ? On capitalism with Chinese characteristics”. New Left Review 65: 63-85.

Alexander, Arthur (2007): The Arc of Japan’s Economic Development. New York: Routledge.  

Arrighi, Giovanni (2007): Adam Smith en Pekín. Orígenes y fundamentos del siglo XXI. Madrid: Akal.

Brandt, Loren & Rawski Thomas G., eds. (2008): China's Great Economic Transformation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bray, Francesca (1986): The Rice Economies. Technology & Development in Asian Societies. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Chen, Chunlai. Ed. (2009): China’s Integration with the Global Economy. WTO Accession. Foreign Investment and International Trade. London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Feenstra, Robert C. & Wei, Shang-jin, eds. (2010): China’s Growing role in World Trade. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Francks, Penny (2016): Japan and the Great Divergence: A Short Guide. UK: Palgrave.

Feuerwerker, Albert (1995): The Chinese Economy, 1870-1949. Michigan: An Arbor Center for Chinese Studies.

García-Herrero Alicia & Ng, Gary (2021): "China’s State Owned Enterprises  and Competitive Neutrality", in World Economics, Vol. 22, No. 1.

Hamashita, Takeshi (2008): China, East Asia and the Global Economy: Regional and Historical Perspectives. New York: Routledge.

Huang, Yasheng (2008): Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics. Entrepreneurship and the State. Cambridge University Press.

Hung, Ho-fung (2009): “America’s head servant? The PRC dilemma in the global crisis”. New Left Review, 60: 5-25.

Hung, Ho-fung (ed.) (2009): China and the Transformation of Global Capitalism, The John Hopkins University Press.

Jacques, Martin (2009): When China Rules the World. London: Allen Lane.

Ka, Zeng, ed. (2007): China’s Foreign Trade Policy. The New Constituencies. New York: Routledge.

Kirby, William C. (2006): “China's Internationalization in the Early People's Republic: Dreams of a Socialist World Economy”. The China Quarterly 188, pp. 870-890.

Kojima, K. (2000): “The Flying gees model of Asian Economic Development: Origin, Theoretical Extensions and Regional Policy Implications”. Journal of Asian Economics, 11: 375-401.

Maddison, Angus (1998): Chinese Economic Performance in the Long Run. Paris: OECD Development Centre.

Mosk, Carl (2008): Japanese Economic Development: Markets, Norms, Structures. USA: Routledge.

Naughton, Barry (1997): The China circle: Economic and Technology in the PRC, Taiwan and Hongkong. Washington: Brookings Institution Press.

Naughton, Barry (2007): The Chinese Economy. Transitions and Growth. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Lardy, Nicholas (2012):Sustaining China's Economic Growth After the Global Financial Crisis. Washington:  Peterson Institute for International.

Lardy, Nicholas (2002): Integration China into the Global Economy. Washington: Brookings Institution Press.

Lardy, Nicholas (1987): ‘Economic recovery and the 1st Five-Year Plan’. En MacFarquhar, Roderick y Fairbank, John King (eds.): The Cambridge History of China. Volume 14. The People’s Republic, Part 1: The emergence of revolutionary China, 1949-1965. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 144-184.

Leonard, Mark (2008): What Does China Think?. London: Fourth Estate.

Leonard, Mark (2012): China 3.0. London: European Council on Foreign Relations.

Lo, Vai & Tian, Xiaowen (2009): Law and Foreign Business and Investment in China. New York: Routledge.

Lu, Aiguo (2000): China and the global economy since 1840. Helsinki: UNU/Wider.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2000): The Great Divergence. China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy. Princeton University Press.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2001): “Is there an east Asian development path? Long-term comparisons, constraints, and continuities”. The Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 44 (3): 322-362.

Pomeranz, Kenneth & Topik, Steven (2006): The World that Trade Created. Society, Culture and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present. New York: M. E. Sharpe.

Pomeranz, Kenneth (2008): “Chinese Development in Long-run Perspective”. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 152 (1): 83-100.

Rawksi, Thomas G. & LI, Lillian M. (eds.) (1992): Chinese History in Economic Perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Richardson, Philip (1999): Economic Change in China, c. 1800-1950. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Saito, Osamu (2010): “An industrious revolution in an East Asian market economy? Tokugawa Japan and implications for the Great Divergence”. Australian Economic History Review. 50. 240-261.

Shambaugh, David (2013): China Goes Global: The Partial Power. New York: Oxford University Press.  

Shiue, Carol, Keller, Wolfgang & Li, Ben (2010): “China’s Foreign Trade. Perspectives from the Past 150 years”. NBER Working Papers 16550.

Soler Matutes, J. (2008). El Milagro económico chino: mito y realidad. Barcelona: Marcial Pons.

Sugihara, Kaoru (2007): “The Second Noel Butlin lecture: Labour-Intensive Industrialisation in Global History”. Australian Economic History Review 47 (2): 121-154.

Sugihara, Kaoru (Ed.) (2005): Japan, China and the Growth of the Asian International Economy, 1850-1949. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Sugihara, Kaoru (2004): “The state and the industrious revolution in Tokugawa Japan”. Working Papers of the Global Economic History Network (GEHN), 02/04. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Wing, Chung-ho (2008): “Building up Modernity? The Changing Spatial Representations of State Power in a Chinese Socialist ‘Model community’”. Modern Asian Studies 42 (6): 1137-1171.

Woo, Wing Thye (1999): “The Real Reasons for China’s Growth”. The China Journal  41: 115-137.

Wu, Chengming & Xu, Dixin (eds.) (2000): Chinese Capitalism, 1522-1840. London: MacMillan Press Ltd.

Wu, Jinglian (1999). Understanding and Interpreting Chinese Economic Reform. (2005) Mason (Ohio): Texere.

Yueh, Linda (2013): China's Growth: The Making of an Economic Superpower, Oxford: OUP. 

Yueh, Linda (2011): Enterprising China: Business, Economic, and Legal Development since 1979, Oxford: OUP.