Consulta de Guies Docents



Curs Acadèmic: 2022/23

8071 - Màster Universitari Avançat en Ciències Jurídiques

32190 - Relacions Internacionals i Governança Global


Informació de la Guia Docent

Curs acadèmic:
2022/23
Centre acadèmic:
807 - Centre Màsters del Departament de Dret
Estudi:
8071 - Màster Universitari Avançat en Ciències Jurídiques
Assignatura:
32190 - Relacions Internacionals i Governança Global
Àmbit:
---
Crèdits:
4.0
Curs:
1
Idiomes de docència:
Teoria: Grup 1: Anglès
Grup 2: Anglès
Professorat:
Adrian Rodriguez Perez, Josep Ibañez Muñoz
Periode d'Impartició:
Primer trimestre
Horari:

Objectius de Desenvolupament Sostenible

GOAL 4: Quality Education

GOAL 5: Gender Equality

GOAL 10: Reduced Inequality

GOAL 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions

GOAL 17: Partnerships to achieve the Goal


Academic Year: 2022/23

8071 - Advanced Master in Legal Sciences

32190 - International Relations and Global Governance


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
807 - Masters Centre of the Department of Law
Study:
8071 - Advanced Master in Legal Sciences
Subject:
32190 - International Relations and Global Governance
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
1
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Teachers:
Adrian Rodriguez Perez, Josep Ibañez Muñoz
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The course is devoted to the study of central issues in International Relations and Global Governance. First, the course covers a number of theoretical approaches that have characterized the discipline since its beginnings and throughout its evolution during the 20th and 21st centuries. This will imply the analysis of mainstreams, theoretical contestations, and contemporary disciplinary debates –idealism vs realism, statism vs pluralism, neorealism vs neoliberalism, rationalism vs reflectivism, etc. Second, the course proposes the study of some core concepts in the discipline of International relations, such as power, sovereignty, actor, authority, violence, war, and cooperation. Third, the course analyses some transformative processes of contemporary world politics, notably globalization and the emergence of global governance, entailing the management of the global public interest.

 

 

Associated skills

Identification and analysis of international issues. Correct use of theories and concepts. Political science skills. Case resolution. Writing specialized documents. Development of capacities related to the use of arguments through oral presentations and written assignments.

Learning outcomes

The course aims at providing an overall understanding and analysis of facts and ideas in the field of international relations and global governance. This will involve using theories and concepts of International Relations, as well as reflecting critically upon the proper decisions to be adopted in order to face and solve global governance issues and challenges. All in all, the course will offer a theoretical and empirical approach to the actors, institutions, functions and implications of international politics.

Sustainable Development Goals

GOAL 4: Quality Education

GOAL 5: Gender Equality

GOAL 10: Reduced Inequality

GOAL 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions

GOAL 17: Partnerships to achieve the Goal

Prerequisites

There are no pre-requisites to take the course, although background on Political Science or International Law will be helpful.

Contents

Session 1

Origins of International Relations as a discipline: the subject matter of international society.

The First World War and the problem of war as the core theme. The systemic and global perspective of International Relations. The Concept of international society. Anarchy and order in international politics. The expansion of the European international society.

 

Readings:

1. Hollis, Martin (1992), “The Growth of a Discipline”, Explaining and Understanding International relations, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1992, pp. 16-44.

2. Bull, H. (1995), “The Concept of Order in World Politics” & “Does Order Exist in World Politics?”, The Anarchical Society. A Study of Order in Word Politics, London, Macmillan (1st ed. 1977), pp. 2-50.

 

Session 2

International Theory: concept and issues.

Concept and functions of International Theory. The three traditions of Western thought in International Theory. The Realist, Maquiavelian or Hobbessian tradition. The Rationalist o Grotian tradition. The Revolucionist or Kantian tradition.

 

Readings:

1. Wight, M. (1994), “Theory of international society”, International Theory. The Three Traditions, Leicester/London, Leicester University Press for The Royal Institute of International Affairs (1st ed. 1991), pp. 30-48.

2. Hoffman, S. (1977), “An American Social Science: International Relations”, in J. Der Derian (ed.) (1995), International Theory. Critical Investigations, New York, New York University Press, pp. 212-241.

 

 

Session 3

Realist vs liberal approaches to international relations

Classical Realism: main tenets. From Classical Realism to Neo-Realism, Structural Realism, and Neo-classical Realism. Liberalism: main tenets and strands. The challenge to Realism and Neo-Realism from Neoliberalism and Institutionalism. The ‘neo’-‘neo’ debate and synthesis.

 

Readings:

1. Carr, E.H. (1939), 'The Beginnings of a Science' & 'Utopia and reality', The Twenty Years’ Crisis, Basingstoke: Palgrave, Chapters 1 & 2, pp. 1-21.

2.Waltz, K. (1990) 'Realist Thought and Neorealist Theory', Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 44,  No. 1, pp. 21-37.

3. Keohane, Robert O. & Joseph S. Nye (1977), ‘Interdependence in World politics’, Power and Interdependence. World Politics in Transition, Boston: Little, Brown and Company, pp. 3-37.

4. Moravcsik, A. (1997) ‘Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics’, International Organization, Vol. 51, No. 4, pp. 513-53.

 

Session 4

Reflectivist and critical approaches to international relations

The evolution of International Relations Theory through ‘Great Divides’ in the 20th century. Challenges to ‘rationalist’ approaches from ‘reflectivist’ perspectives. Critical Theory. Post-structuralism. Feminist and gender studies. Post-colonial studies. Constructivism.

 

Readings:

1. Cox, R. (1981), 'Social Forces, States, and World Orders: Beyond International Relations Theory', Millennium Journal of International Studies, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 126-55.

2. Wendt, A. (1992), ’Anarchy is what states make of it: the social construction of power politics’, International Organization, Vol. 46, No. 2, pp. 391-426.

3. Tickner, J. A. & L. Sjoberg (2016), ‘Feminism’, in T. Dunne, M. Kurki & S. Smith (eds.) (2016), Theories of International Relations: Discipline and Diversity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, Chapter 11.

4. Campbell, D. (2013) ‘Poststructuralism’ in Dunne, T., M. Kurki & S. Smith (eds.) Theories of International Relations: Discipline and Diversity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, Chapter 12.

 

Session 5

Power in international relations

Sources of power and the measure of power. Hard power vs soft power. Structural power and power structures.

 

Readings:

1. Strange, S. (1986), "The Conflict of Values and Theories" and "Power in the World Economy", States and Markets, London: Pinter, pp. 9-42.

2. Nye Jr., J.S. (1990), “Soft Power”, Foreign Policy, No. 80, pp. 153-171.

3. Guzzini, Stefano (2008), “On the measure of power and the power of measure in International Relations”, DIIS Working Paper, No. 29.

Session 6

State, territoriality, and sovereignty

The question of agency in international relations. The State, main actor in international relations. Transformations of sovereignty and territoriality.

 

Readings:

1. Barkin, J. Samuel & Cronin, Bruce (1994), “The state and the nation: changing norms and the rules of sovereignty in international relations”, International Organization, Vol. 48, No. 1, pp. 107-130.

2. Krasner, S. (1996), ‘Compromising Westphalia’, International Security, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 115-151.

 

Session 7

Non-state actors and authorities

The private and the public in international affairs. The relevance of non-state actors in world politics. The essence of authority, and the presence of private authorities in international affairs.

 

Readings:

1. Cutler, C., Haufler, V. & Porter, T. (1999), “The Contours and Significance of Private Authorities in International Affairs”, in Cutler, C., Haufler, V. & Porter, T. (eds.), Private Authority and International Affairs, Albany: State University of New York Press, pp. 333-376.

2. Deborah D. Avant; Martha Finnemore; Susan K. Sell (2010), “Who governs the globe”, in Deborah D. Avant; Martha Finnemore; Susan K. Sell (eds.), Who Governs the Globe?, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-31.

 

Session 8

Violence and war in contemporary international relations

Sources and forms or violence in international relations. Transformations in patterns of armed conflict: new wars? The privatization of security: private military and security companies.

 

Readings:

1. Kaldor, Mary (2013), "In Defence of New Wars", Stability, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 1-16.

2. Singer, P.W. (2005), "Outsourcing War", Foreign Affairs, Vol. 84, No. 2, pp. 119-132.

 

Session 9

Accommodation and cooperation in contemporary international relations: International organisations

Concepts and theories of international organisations. The emergence of international institutions. Design and decision-making in international institutions.

 

Readings:

1. Mearsheimer, John. J. (1995), “The False Promise of International Institutions”, International Security, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 5-49.

2. Barnett, Michael N. & Martha Finnemore (2004), "International Organisations as Bureaucracies", Rules for the World: International Organization in Global Politics, New York: Cornell University Press, pp. 16-44.

Session 10

Governing globalization: Global Governance

Structural changes in contemporary world politics. Globalization: theoretical framework, explanatory factors, constitutive processes, and political implications. The new needs of governance beyond interstate politics.

 

Readings:

1. Michael Zürn (2018), “Introduction: Global Governance in Hard Times”, A Theory of Global Governance. Authority, Legitimacy, and Contestation, Oxford: OUP, 2018, pp. 1-21.

2. John G. Ruggie (2004), “Reconstituting the Global Public Domain – Issues, Actors, and Practices”, European Journal of International Relations, Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 499-531.

 

Session 11

The normative dimension of global governance

Norms and institutions in global governance: beyond traditional international law. Legalization, global administrative law, and informal international lawmaking. The legitimacy of international institutions in global governance. The normative debate about global governance: communitarism vs cosmopolitism.

 

Readings:

1. Kenneth W. Abbott; Robert O. Keohane; Andrew Moravcsik; Anne-Marie Slaughter; Duncan Snidal (2000), “The Concept of Legalization”, International Organization, vol. 54, nº 3, 2000, pp. 401-419.

2. Kenneth W. Abbott & Duncan Snidal (2009), “The Governance Triangle: Regulatory Standards Institutions and the Shadow of the State”, in Walter Mattli & Ngaire Woods (eds.), The Politics of Global Regulation, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, pp. 44-88.

 

Session 12

Global governance in the making

Patterns of global governance: policy stages, actors and authorities, norms and institutions. Competence and legitimacy in global governance.

 

Readings:

1. Joost Pauwelyn; Ramses A. Wessel; Jan Wouters (2014), "When Structures Become Shackles: Stagnation and Dynamics in International Lawmaking", The European Journal of International Law, vol. 25, No. 3, pp. 733-763.

2. Ruth W. Grant & Robert O. Keohane (2005), “Accountability and Abuses of Power in World Politics”, American Political Science Review, Vol. 99, No. 1, pp. 29-43.

Teaching Methods

The course will develop all along a term, with twelve two-hour sessions. Each of them will consist of a lecture or seminar conducted by the professor, and in some cases additional activities addressed to specific issues of the course. Depending of the nature of such activities, active participation of students will be required. Readings for each session are compulsory as a basis for discussion.

Evaluation

 

 

Apart from lectures, course actitivies will imply course and reading assignments, as well as active participation by students. The evaluation of the course will combine continous assessment and a final examination, according to the following criteria:

 

Activities

%

Assessment guidelines

Course assignments

50%

Precision and pertinence of content will be highly valued in each of the assignments

Class participation

10%

Pertinence and originality of active participation will be highly valued

Final examination

40%

Quality of arguments and pertinence of answers will be highly valued

Retaking conditions: For students failing the course after the final examination, it will exceptionally be possible to retake the exam while grades for course assignments and class participation are maintained.

Bibliography and information resources

Bibliography:

Abbott, K. W. & D. J. Snidal (eds.), The Spectrum of International Institutions: An Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Global Governance, London: Routledge, 2021.

Avant, D., M. Finnemore & S. K. Sell (eds.), Who Governs the Globe?, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Baldwin, D. A. (ed.), Neorealism and Neoliberalism. The Contemporary Debate, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Barnett, M. N., Pevehouse, J.C.W. & Raustiala, K. (eds.), Global Governance in a World of Change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021.

Brown, C., Understanding International Relations, Londres: Red Globe Press, 5ª ed., 2020.

Bull, H., The Anarchical Society. A Study of Order in World Politics, London: Macmillan, 1977.

Buzan, B. & R. Little, International Systems in World History. Remaking the Study of International Relations, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Cox, R. W. (with Sinclair, T. J.), Approaches to World Order, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Cuttler, C., V. Haufler & T. Porter (eds.), Private Authority and International Affairs, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1999.

Der Derian, J. (ed.), International Theory. Critical Investigations, New York: New York University Press. 1995.

Diehl, Paul F. & B. Frederking (eds.), The Politics of Global Governance: International Organizations in an Interdependent World, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 5th ed., 2015.

Doyle, M. W. & G. J. Ikenberry (eds.), New Thinking in International Relations Theory, Boulder, Co.: Westview Press, 1997.

Drezner, D. W., All Politics Is Global. Explaining International Regulatory Regimes, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007.

Dunne, T., M. Kurki & S. Smith (eds.), Theories of International Relations: Discipline and Diversity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 5th ed., 2020.

Dunoff, J. L. & J. P. Trachtman (eds.), Ruling the World? Constitutionalism, Internacional Law and Global Governance, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Gill, S., Power and Resistance in the New World Order, Basingtore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.

Groom, A.J.R., A. Barrinha & W. C. Olson, International Relations Then and Now. Origins and Trends in Interpretation, London: Routledge, 1995.

Guzzini, S. & I. Neumann (eds.), The Diffusion of Power in Global Governance, Basingtore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

Held, D. & A. McGrew; Goldblatt, D. & J. Perraton, Global Transformations. Politics, Economics and Culture, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.

Held, D. & A. McGrew (eds.), Governing Globalization: Power, Authority and Global Governance, Cambridge: Polity Press, 2002.

Hewson, M. & T. J. Sinclair (eds.), Approaches to Global Governance Theory, New York: State University of New York Press, 1999.

Jacob Sending, O., The Politics of Expertise. Competing for Authority in Global Governance, University of Michigan, 2015.

Jackson, R., G. Sørensen & J. Møller, Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 7th ed., 2018.

Kubalkova, N., N. Onuf & P. Kowert (eds.), International Relations in a Constructed World, Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1998.

Krisch, N., Beyond Constitutionalism: The Pluralist Structure of Postnational Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.

Levi-Faur, D. (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Governance, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

Lopez-Claros, A., A. L. Dahl & M. Groff, Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020.

Macdonald, T., Global Stakeholder Democracy: Power and Representation Beyond Liberal States, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Mattli, W. & N. Woods (eds.), The Politics of Global Regulation, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Milner, H. V. & A. Moravcsik (eds.), Power, Interdependence, and Nonstate Actors in World Politics, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Newman, E., R. Thakur & J. Tirman (eds.), Multilateralism Under Challenge? Power, International Order, and Structural Change, New York: United Nations, 2006.

Nye Jr., J. S. & J. D. Donahue (eds.), Governance in a Globalizing World, Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2000.

O’Brien, R., A. M. Goetz, J.-A. Scholte & M. Williams, Contesting Global Governance. Multilateral Economic Institutions and Global Social Movements, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Onuf, N., World of Our Making: Rules and Rule in Social Theory and International Relations, New York: Columbia, University of South Carolina Press, 1989.

Paul, T. V. & J. A. Hall (eds.), International Order and the Future of World Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Pauwelyn, J., R. A. Wessel & J. Wouters, Informal International Lawmaking, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

Roberson, B. A. (ed.), International Society and the Development of International Relations Theory, London & Washington: Pinter, 1998.

Roger, Ch., The Origins of Informality. Why the Legal Foundations of Global Governance are Shifting, and Why It Matters, Oxford: OUP, 2020.

Rosenau, J. N. & E. O. Czempiel (eds.), Governance Without Government: Order and Change in World Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Sinclair, T. J., Global Governance, Cambridge: Polity Press, 2012.

Steans, J., Gender & International Relations, Cambridge: Polity Press, 3ª ed., 2013.

Waltz, K. N., Theory of International Politics, London: Addison Wesley, 1979.

Weiss, T. G. & R. Wilkinson (eds.), Rethinking Global Governance, Cambridge: Polity, 2019.

Wendt, A., Social Theory of International Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Wight, G. & B. Porter, International Theory. The Three Traditions, Leicester/London: Leicester University Press for the Royal Institute of International Affairs, 1996.

Zürn, M., A Theory of Global Governance. Authority, Legitimacy, and Contestation, Oxford: OUP, 2018.

 

Required readings and additional materials:

Required readings will be available for students at the beginning of the course.

Additional materials may be required to prepare course activities. The professor will give indications about such activities and the required materials.


Curs Acadèmic: 2022/23

8071 - Màster Universitari Avançat en Ciències Jurídiques

32190 - Relacions Internacionals i Governança Global


Información de la Guía Docente

Curs acadèmic:
2022/23
Centre acadèmic:
807 - Centre Màsters del Departament de Dret
Estudi:
8071 - Màster Universitari Avançat en Ciències Jurídiques
Assignatura:
32190 - Relacions Internacionals i Governança Global
Àmbit:
---
Crèdits:
4.0
Curs:
1
Idiomes de docència:
Teoria: Grup 1: Anglès
Grup 2: Anglès
Professorat:
Adrian Rodriguez Perez, Josep Ibañez Muñoz
Periode d'Impartició:
Primer trimestre
Horari:

Objectius de Desenvolupament Sostenible

GOAL 4: Quality Education

GOAL 5: Gender Equality

GOAL 10: Reduced Inequality

GOAL 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions

GOAL 17: Partnerships to achieve the Goal