Consulta de Guies Docents



Academic Year/course: 2022/23

26210 - Gender and Law


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
304 - Faculty of Law and Economics
331 - Faculty of Law
Study:
3041 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics
3312 - Bachelor's (Degree) Programme in Law
Subject:
26210 - Gender and Law
Credits:
5.0
Course:
669 - Minor in Gender Studies: 1
415 - Bachelor's degree in Law: 3
415 - Bachelor's degree in Law: 4
523 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics: 5
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Group 3: English
Group 4: English
Teachers:
Josep Capdeferro Pla, Arnau Nonell i Rodriguez, Ester Farnos Amoros, Raquel Montaner Fernandez
Teaching Period:
First Quarter o Second Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The goal of the course is the analysis of relevant legal institutions from a gender perspective, putting into question the legal neutrality present in several fields. On one hand, the course deals with the legal treatment of the situation of women through the lens of history, paying special attention to Middle, Modern and Contemporary ages. On the other hand, the course focuses on the main institutions of private law -from contract law to personal and family law- given its capacity for perpetuating gender stereotypes and promoting dependency relationships. Finally, from a criminal law perspective, the course takes into consideration violence against women and legal protection against all forms of mistreatment, sexual violence and crimes against life.

Associated skills

"Gender and the Law" will allow students to get or reinforce skills on:

  • Analyzing legal, political and social phenomena from a gender perspective. 
  • Checking mutations on gender issues from the perspectives of identity and narrative. 
  • Appraising historical developments concerning gender items in legal terms.  
  • Evaluating recent and present partial achievements on gender issues.  
  • Comparing through the lens of gender roles of men and women in crucial aspects of life. 
  • Condemning historical (and recent!) phenomena of intolerance towards what were (still are?) considered gender and sexual deviations. 
  • Opening minds on gender theory and fighting against gender discrimination.

Learning outcomes

Coherently with the goal, the planning, the historical, cultural, civil and criminal contents, the bibliography and the skills of this course, students will develop an open a critical awareness of gender issues. It will help their contribution to the improvement of legal systems, in permanent evolution, and will empower them to identify, to repair and to stop any ongoing discrimination.

Sustainable Development Goals

# Gender Equality # Reduced Inequalities # Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Prerequisites

None: although this module belongs to the curriculum of the degree in Law, courses will be taught for students not necessarily familiarized with legal language.

Contents

Section I. Historical and cultural perspective

Unit 1. Identity: how gender was shaped in binary terms; religions and norms 

Unit 2. Alterity: queer individuals before the rules of majority 

Unit 3. Agency: (limited) civil faculties that women enjoyed in Western societies

Unit 4. Liability: women before Criminal Law and Criminal Courts 

Unit 5. Sorority: leaders and organizations pleading for women's cultural, political and social rights (19th-20th century)

 

Section II. Private Law from a Gender perspective

Unit 1. Introduction. The institutionalization and construction of gender: legal status of trans and intergender persons. Freedom not to contract and discrimination because of sexual orientation.

Unit 2. Marriage and civil partnerships from a gender perspective. Consequences of family breakdown: the never-ending debate on joint custody.

Unit 3. Sex, reproduction and parenthood. Feminist thoughts on abortion and surrogacy.

 

Section III. Criminal Law from a Gender perspective 

Unit 1. The concept of gender-based violence according to Criminal Law

Unit 2. About the crime of forced marriage and honor crimes: gender-based crimes?

Unit 3. Crimes against sexual freedom: The interpretation of criminal law and the relevance of consent?

Unit 4. Criminal justice system and victim's autonomy: no drop policies

 

Teaching Methods

Several teaching methods will interact:

1. Readings on recommended bibliography, legal sources and case-law;

2. Debates on readings;

3. Lecturing;

4. Text analysis;

5. Oral presentations;

Evaluation

The final grade of the course is obtained through ongoing assessment, which represents 100% of the final grade. This final grade is obtained by calculating the arithmetic average mark of each section of the course. Each section represents 33.3% of the final grade.

In each section of the course, students will be proposed two compulsory evaluable activities and will have their engagement in classroom discussions rewarded up to 20% of the grade.

The lecturer of each section will inform at the beginning of the course about the dynamics of these evaluable activities. Materials will be provided by lecturers at the Aula Global and/or available at the UPF library.  

Whoever at the end of the term obtains a grade lower than 5 of the total of the course and has participated in at least 5 of the evaluable activities of the whole course, will be able to resit the course at the beginning of the following term. This resit will consist in an oral exam, which will determine 100% of the grade of the course.

 

Bibliography and information resources

SECTION I

Compulsory readings:

BOES, Maria R., "'Dishonourable' youth, guilds, and the changed world view of sex, illegitimacy, and women in late-sixteenth-century Germany", in Continuity and Change, n. 18(3), pp. 345-372 (2003).

CAPDEFERRO, Josep, "Humble, but courageous. Modest women defending their rights in Early Modern Catalonia", in J. Vicent ESCARTÍ, Biografies invisibles / Invisible biographies, John Benjamins, 2021, pp. 91-103.

POSKA, Allyson M., "The Case for Agentic Gender Norms for Women in Early Modern Europe", in Gender & History, n. 30(2), pp. 345-365 (July 2018)

 

Elective readings: 

M. ARMSTRONG-PARTIDA, "Concubinage, illegitimacy and fatherhood: Urban masculinity in Late-medieval Barcelona", in Gender & History, vol. 31 No. 1 March 2019, pp. 195-219.

C. CRISTELLON, "Between Sacrament, Sin and Crime: Mixed Marriages and the Roman Church in Early Mod. Europe", in Gender & History, vol. 29 No. 3 November 2017, pp. 605-621.

L. DALLAVALLE, "The Moretti Family: Late Marriage, Bachelorhood and Domestic Authority in 17th cent. Venice", in Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 3 November 2015, pp. 684-702.

P. FONTES DA COSTA, “’Mediating Sexual Difference’: the Medical Understanding of HumanHermaphrodites in Eighteenth-century England”, in W. de Blécourt and C. Urborne, CulturalApproaches to the History of Medicine, Palgrave-Macmillan, 2004, pp. 127-147.

G. HOUBRE, "Hermaphroditism in Marriage Annulment Proceedings in 19th cent. France", in Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 1 April 2015, pp. 112-130.

L. LAUMONIER, "Meanings of Fatherhood in Late-Medieval Montpellier: Love, Care and the Exercise of Patria Potestas" Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 3 Novembre 2015, pp. 651-668.

S. MCDOUGALL, “The transformation of Adultery in France at the End of the Middle Ages”, in Law and History Review, vol. 32(3), August 2014, pp. 491-524.

J. MERRICK, "New sources and questions for research on sexual relations between men in 18th cent. France", in Gender & History, vol. 30 No. 1 March 2018, pp. 9-29.

J. ROELENS, "A woman like any other: Female Sodomy, Hermaphroditism and Witchcraft in 17th-Century Bruges", in Journal of Women's History, 29 (4), 2017, p. 11-34.

 

SECTION II

Unit 1

Selected readings:

  • BARTLETT, Katharine T., «Feminism and Family Law», Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 33 No. 3, 1999, pp. 475-500.
  • BARTLETT, Katharine T., «Gender Law: After Twenty-Five Years», 27 Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy 1-23 (2020).
  • ESTEVE ALGUACIL, Laura / NONELL RODRÍGUEZ, Arnau, «Good Intentions May Not Be Enough: The Spanish Draft BIll for the Equality of Trans and LGBTI people», VerfBlog, 2021/12/08: https://verfassungsblog.de/spanish-lgbtq-bill/

Case law:

  • German Federal Constitutional Court judgement of 10.10.2017 (1 BvR 2019/16).
  • Bull and Bull v. Hall and Preddy ([2013] UKSC 73).
  • Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd., et al. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission et al., Supreme Court of the United States of America, 4.6.2018, pp. 1-18.
  • Lee v. Ashers Baking Company ([2018] UKSC 49).
  • X and Y v. Romania, ECtHR, Nos. 2145/16 and 20607/16, 19 January 2021.

Supplementary readings:

  • BREMS, Eva / CANNOOT, Pieter / MOONEN, Toon (eds.), Protecting trans rights in the age of gender self-determination, Intersentia, 2020.
  • European Commission, Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers, Legal gender recognition in the EU. The journeys of trans people towards full equality, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2020, pp. 1-17 and 109-118.
  • Commissioner for Human Rights of the council of europe, Human Rights and Intersex People, Council of Europe, Strasbourg, 2015. 

Unit 2

Selected readings:

  • BARTLETT, Katharine T. / STACK, Carol B., «Joint Custody, Feminism and the Dependency Dilemma», Berkeley Woman’s Law Journal, 9, 1986.
  • JACOBS, Susan Beth, «The Hidden Gender Bias Behind “The Best Interest of the Child” Standard in Custody Decisions», Georgia State University Law Review, Vol. 13: Iss. 3, Article 5, 1996, pp. 845-901.
  • PALAZZO, Nausica, «Marriage Apostates: Why Heterosexuals Seek Same-Sex Registered Partnerships», Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2022.

Case law:

  • Obergefell et al. v. Hodges, Director, Ohio Department of Health, et al., Supreme Court of the United States of America, 26.6.2015, pp. 1-28.
  • Ratzenböck and Seydl v. Austria, ECtHR (5th section), 26.10.2017.
  • R (on the application of Steinfeld and Keidan) (Appellants) v. Secretary of State for the International Development (in substitution for the Home Secretary and the Education Secretary) (Respondent) ([2018] UKSC 32).
  • Atala Riffo and daughters v. Chile, IACtHR 24.2.2012.

Supplementary reading:

  • POLIKOFF, Nancy, "We Will Get What We Ask For: Why Lezalizing Gay and Lesbian Marriage Will Not Dismantle the Legal Structure of Gender in Every Marriage", 79 Virginia Law Review, 1993.

Unit 3

Selected readings:

  • ABRAMS, Paula L., «The Bad Mother: Stigma, Abortion and Surrogacy», The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Volume 43, Issue 2, 2015, pp. 179-191.
  • FARNÓS AMORÓS, Esther, «Surrogacy in Spain», in Scherpe, Jens M. / Fenton-Glynn, Claire / Kaan, Terry (eds.), Eastern and Western Perspectives on Surrogacy, Intersentia, Cambridge, 2019, pp. 59-82.
  • MARGARIA, Alice, «Trans Men Giving Birth and Reflections on Fatherhood: What to Expect?», International Journal of Law, Policy and The Family 34(3), 2020, pp. 1–22.
  • SATZ, Debra, «5. Markets in Women’s Reproductive Labor», Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, Oxford University Press, 2010.

Case law:

  • R (McConnell and YY) v Registrar General ([2020] EWCA Civ 559).
  • A.M. and others v. Russia, ECtHR (3rd section), 6.7.2021.
  • Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, Supreme Court of the United States, 24.6.2022.

Supplementary readings:

  • BOWMAN, Cynthia Grant / ROSENBURY, Laura A. / TUERKHEIMER, Deborah / YURACKO, Kimberly A., «Chapter 5: Women and Reproduction» in Feminist Jurisprudence: Cases and Materials, 5th ed., West Academic Publishing, 2018.
  • DETHLOFF, Nina / KAESLING, Katharina (eds.), Between sexuality, gender and reproduction. On the pluralisation of Family Forms, Intersentia, 2022.

SECTION III 

Unit 1

MacKinnon, C. A. (1983), “Feminism, Marxism, Method, and the State: Toward Feminist Jurisprudence”, Signs, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Summer, 1983), pp. 635-658. Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3173687

Butler, J., “ Sexual consent: some thoughts on psychoanalysis and law”, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1087: 178–205 (2006).

Etienne, M. (1995), “Addressing gender-based violence in a international context”, 18 Harv. Women's L.J. 139. 

Unit 2

Keyhani, N. (2013), “Honour crimes as gender-based violence in the UK: A critical assessment”, UCL Journal of Law and Jurisprudence

Toy-Cronin, B. A. (2010), “What is forced marriage? Towards a definition of forced marriage as a crime against humanity”, 19 Colum. J. Gender & L. 539.

Unit 3

Butler, J. (2011), “ Sexual consent: some thoughts on psychoanalysis and law”, Columbia Journal of Gender and the Law; New York, 21(2): 405–429.

Halley, J. (2016), "The Move to Affirmative Consent", Journal of Women in Culture and Society 2016, vol. 42, no. 1: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.1086/686904

MacKinnon, C. A. (1989), “Sexuality, Pornography, and Method: "Pleasure under Patriarchy"”, Ethics, Vol. 99, No. 2 (Jan., 1989), pp. 314-346. Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2381437

Jozkowski, K. N. (2016), “Barriers to Affirmative Consent Policies and the Need for Affirmative Sexuality”, University of the Pacific Law Review / Vol. 47.

Tuerkheimer, D. (2016), “Affirmative Consent”, 3 Ohio St. J. Crim. L. 441

Unit 4

UNODC, Handbook for the Judiciary on Effective Criminal Justice Responses to Gender-Based Violence Against Women and Girls, 2019. Ebook: https://www.unodc.org/pdf/criminal_justice/HB_for_the_Judiciary_on_Effective_Criminal_Justice_Women_and_Girls_E_ebook.pdf

Han, E. L. (2003), "Mandatory Arrest and No-Drop Policies: Victim Empowerment in Domestic Violence Cases", Boston College Third World Law Journal, Vol. 23, Issue 1.


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

26210 - Gender and Law


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
304 - Faculty of Law and Economics
331 - Faculty of Law
Study:
3041 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics
3312 - Bachelor's (Degree) Programme in Law
Subject:
26210 - Gender and Law
Credits:
5.0
Course:
669 - Minor in Gender Studies: 1
415 - Bachelor's degree in Law: 3
415 - Bachelor's degree in Law: 4
523 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics: 5
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Group 3: English
Group 4: English
Teachers:
Josep Capdeferro Pla, Arnau Nonell i Rodriguez, Ester Farnos Amoros, Raquel Montaner Fernandez
Teaching Period:
First Quarter o Second Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The goal of the course is the analysis of relevant legal institutions from a gender perspective, putting into question the legal neutrality present in several fields. On one hand, the course deals with the legal treatment of the situation of women through the lens of history, paying special attention to Middle, Modern and Contemporary ages. On the other hand, the course focuses on the main institutions of private law -from contract law to personal and family law- given its capacity for perpetuating gender stereotypes and promoting dependency relationships. Finally, from a criminal law perspective, the course takes into consideration violence against women and legal protection against all forms of mistreatment, sexual violence and crimes against life.

Associated skills

"Gender and the Law" will allow students to get or reinforce skills on:

  • Analyzing legal, political and social phenomena from a gender perspective. 
  • Checking mutations on gender issues from the perspectives of identity and narrative. 
  • Appraising historical developments concerning gender items in legal terms.  
  • Evaluating recent and present partial achievements on gender issues.  
  • Comparing through the lens of gender roles of men and women in crucial aspects of life. 
  • Condemning historical (and recent!) phenomena of intolerance towards what were (still are?) considered gender and sexual deviations. 
  • Opening minds on gender theory and fighting against gender discrimination.

Learning outcomes

Coherently with the goal, the planning, the historical, cultural, civil and criminal contents, the bibliography and the skills of this course, students will develop an open a critical awareness of gender issues. It will help their contribution to the improvement of legal systems, in permanent evolution, and will empower them to identify, to repair and to stop any ongoing discrimination.

Sustainable Development Goals

# Gender Equality # Reduced Inequalities # Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Prerequisites

None: although this module belongs to the curriculum of the degree in Law, courses will be taught for students not necessarily familiarized with legal language.

Contents

Section I. Historical and cultural perspective

Unit 1. Identity: how gender was shaped in binary terms; religions and norms 

Unit 2. Alterity: queer individuals before the rules of majority 

Unit 3. Agency: (limited) civil faculties that women enjoyed in Western societies

Unit 4. Liability: women before Criminal Law and Criminal Courts 

Unit 5. Sorority: leaders and organizations pleading for women's cultural, political and social rights (19th-20th century)

 

Section II. Private Law from a Gender perspective

Unit 1. Introduction. The institutionalization and construction of gender: legal status of trans and intergender persons. Freedom not to contract and discrimination because of sexual orientation.

Unit 2. Marriage and civil partnerships from a gender perspective. Consequences of family breakdown: the never-ending debate on joint custody.

Unit 3. Sex, reproduction and parenthood. Feminist thoughts on abortion and surrogacy.

 

Section III. Criminal Law from a Gender perspective 

Unit 1. The concept of gender-based violence according to Criminal Law

Unit 2. About the crime of forced marriage and honor crimes: gender-based crimes?

Unit 3. Crimes against sexual freedom: The interpretation of criminal law and the relevance of consent?

Unit 4. Criminal justice system and victim's autonomy: no drop policies

 

Teaching Methods

Several teaching methods will interact:

1. Readings on recommended bibliography, legal sources and case-law;

2. Debates on readings;

3. Lecturing;

4. Text analysis;

5. Oral presentations;

Evaluation

The final grade of the course is obtained through ongoing assessment, which represents 100% of the final grade. This final grade is obtained by calculating the arithmetic average mark of each section of the course. Each section represents 33.3% of the final grade.

In each section of the course, students will be proposed two compulsory evaluable activities and will have their engagement in classroom discussions rewarded up to 20% of the grade.

The lecturer of each section will inform at the beginning of the course about the dynamics of these evaluable activities. Materials will be provided by lecturers at the Aula Global and/or available at the UPF library.  

Whoever at the end of the term obtains a grade lower than 5 of the total of the course and has participated in at least 5 of the evaluable activities of the whole course, will be able to resit the course at the beginning of the following term. This resit will consist in an oral exam, which will determine 100% of the grade of the course.

 

Bibliography and information resources

SECTION I

Compulsory readings:

BOES, Maria R., "'Dishonourable' youth, guilds, and the changed world view of sex, illegitimacy, and women in late-sixteenth-century Germany", in Continuity and Change, n. 18(3), pp. 345-372 (2003).

CAPDEFERRO, Josep, "Humble, but courageous. Modest women defending their rights in Early Modern Catalonia", in J. Vicent ESCARTÍ, Biografies invisibles / Invisible biographies, John Benjamins, 2021, pp. 91-103.

POSKA, Allyson M., "The Case for Agentic Gender Norms for Women in Early Modern Europe", in Gender & History, n. 30(2), pp. 345-365 (July 2018)

 

Elective readings: 

M. ARMSTRONG-PARTIDA, "Concubinage, illegitimacy and fatherhood: Urban masculinity in Late-medieval Barcelona", in Gender & History, vol. 31 No. 1 March 2019, pp. 195-219.

C. CRISTELLON, "Between Sacrament, Sin and Crime: Mixed Marriages and the Roman Church in Early Mod. Europe", in Gender & History, vol. 29 No. 3 November 2017, pp. 605-621.

L. DALLAVALLE, "The Moretti Family: Late Marriage, Bachelorhood and Domestic Authority in 17th cent. Venice", in Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 3 November 2015, pp. 684-702.

P. FONTES DA COSTA, “’Mediating Sexual Difference’: the Medical Understanding of HumanHermaphrodites in Eighteenth-century England”, in W. de Blécourt and C. Urborne, CulturalApproaches to the History of Medicine, Palgrave-Macmillan, 2004, pp. 127-147.

G. HOUBRE, "Hermaphroditism in Marriage Annulment Proceedings in 19th cent. France", in Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 1 April 2015, pp. 112-130.

L. LAUMONIER, "Meanings of Fatherhood in Late-Medieval Montpellier: Love, Care and the Exercise of Patria Potestas" Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 3 Novembre 2015, pp. 651-668.

S. MCDOUGALL, “The transformation of Adultery in France at the End of the Middle Ages”, in Law and History Review, vol. 32(3), August 2014, pp. 491-524.

J. MERRICK, "New sources and questions for research on sexual relations between men in 18th cent. France", in Gender & History, vol. 30 No. 1 March 2018, pp. 9-29.

J. ROELENS, "A woman like any other: Female Sodomy, Hermaphroditism and Witchcraft in 17th-Century Bruges", in Journal of Women's History, 29 (4), 2017, p. 11-34.

 

SECTION II

Unit 1

Selected readings:

  • BARTLETT, Katharine T., «Feminism and Family Law», Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 33 No. 3, 1999, pp. 475-500.
  • BARTLETT, Katharine T., «Gender Law: After Twenty-Five Years», 27 Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy 1-23 (2020).
  • ESTEVE ALGUACIL, Laura / NONELL RODRÍGUEZ, Arnau, «Good Intentions May Not Be Enough: The Spanish Draft BIll for the Equality of Trans and LGBTI people», VerfBlog, 2021/12/08: https://verfassungsblog.de/spanish-lgbtq-bill/

Case law:

  • German Federal Constitutional Court judgement of 10.10.2017 (1 BvR 2019/16).
  • Bull and Bull v. Hall and Preddy ([2013] UKSC 73).
  • Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd., et al. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission et al., Supreme Court of the United States of America, 4.6.2018, pp. 1-18.
  • Lee v. Ashers Baking Company ([2018] UKSC 49).
  • X and Y v. Romania, ECtHR, Nos. 2145/16 and 20607/16, 19 January 2021.

Supplementary readings:

  • BREMS, Eva / CANNOOT, Pieter / MOONEN, Toon (eds.), Protecting trans rights in the age of gender self-determination, Intersentia, 2020.
  • European Commission, Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers, Legal gender recognition in the EU. The journeys of trans people towards full equality, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2020, pp. 1-17 and 109-118.
  • Commissioner for Human Rights of the council of europe, Human Rights and Intersex People, Council of Europe, Strasbourg, 2015. 

Unit 2

Selected readings:

  • BARTLETT, Katharine T. / STACK, Carol B., «Joint Custody, Feminism and the Dependency Dilemma», Berkeley Woman’s Law Journal, 9, 1986.
  • JACOBS, Susan Beth, «The Hidden Gender Bias Behind “The Best Interest of the Child” Standard in Custody Decisions», Georgia State University Law Review, Vol. 13: Iss. 3, Article 5, 1996, pp. 845-901.
  • PALAZZO, Nausica, «Marriage Apostates: Why Heterosexuals Seek Same-Sex Registered Partnerships», Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2022.

Case law:

  • Obergefell et al. v. Hodges, Director, Ohio Department of Health, et al., Supreme Court of the United States of America, 26.6.2015, pp. 1-28.
  • Ratzenböck and Seydl v. Austria, ECtHR (5th section), 26.10.2017.
  • R (on the application of Steinfeld and Keidan) (Appellants) v. Secretary of State for the International Development (in substitution for the Home Secretary and the Education Secretary) (Respondent) ([2018] UKSC 32).
  • Atala Riffo and daughters v. Chile, IACtHR 24.2.2012.

Supplementary reading:

  • POLIKOFF, Nancy, "We Will Get What We Ask For: Why Lezalizing Gay and Lesbian Marriage Will Not Dismantle the Legal Structure of Gender in Every Marriage", 79 Virginia Law Review, 1993.

Unit 3

Selected readings:

  • ABRAMS, Paula L., «The Bad Mother: Stigma, Abortion and Surrogacy», The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Volume 43, Issue 2, 2015, pp. 179-191.
  • FARNÓS AMORÓS, Esther, «Surrogacy in Spain», in Scherpe, Jens M. / Fenton-Glynn, Claire / Kaan, Terry (eds.), Eastern and Western Perspectives on Surrogacy, Intersentia, Cambridge, 2019, pp. 59-82.
  • MARGARIA, Alice, «Trans Men Giving Birth and Reflections on Fatherhood: What to Expect?», International Journal of Law, Policy and The Family 34(3), 2020, pp. 1–22.
  • SATZ, Debra, «5. Markets in Women’s Reproductive Labor», Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, Oxford University Press, 2010.

Case law:

  • R (McConnell and YY) v Registrar General ([2020] EWCA Civ 559).
  • A.M. and others v. Russia, ECtHR (3rd section), 6.7.2021.
  • Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, Supreme Court of the United States, 24.6.2022.

Supplementary readings:

  • BOWMAN, Cynthia Grant / ROSENBURY, Laura A. / TUERKHEIMER, Deborah / YURACKO, Kimberly A., «Chapter 5: Women and Reproduction» in Feminist Jurisprudence: Cases and Materials, 5th ed., West Academic Publishing, 2018.
  • DETHLOFF, Nina / KAESLING, Katharina (eds.), Between sexuality, gender and reproduction. On the pluralisation of Family Forms, Intersentia, 2022.

SECTION III 

Unit 1

MacKinnon, C. A. (1983), “Feminism, Marxism, Method, and the State: Toward Feminist Jurisprudence”, Signs, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Summer, 1983), pp. 635-658. Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3173687

Butler, J., “ Sexual consent: some thoughts on psychoanalysis and law”, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1087: 178–205 (2006).

Etienne, M. (1995), “Addressing gender-based violence in a international context”, 18 Harv. Women's L.J. 139. 

Unit 2

Keyhani, N. (2013), “Honour crimes as gender-based violence in the UK: A critical assessment”, UCL Journal of Law and Jurisprudence

Toy-Cronin, B. A. (2010), “What is forced marriage? Towards a definition of forced marriage as a crime against humanity”, 19 Colum. J. Gender & L. 539.

Unit 3

Butler, J. (2011), “ Sexual consent: some thoughts on psychoanalysis and law”, Columbia Journal of Gender and the Law; New York, 21(2): 405–429.

Halley, J. (2016), "The Move to Affirmative Consent", Journal of Women in Culture and Society 2016, vol. 42, no. 1: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.1086/686904

MacKinnon, C. A. (1989), “Sexuality, Pornography, and Method: "Pleasure under Patriarchy"”, Ethics, Vol. 99, No. 2 (Jan., 1989), pp. 314-346. Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2381437

Jozkowski, K. N. (2016), “Barriers to Affirmative Consent Policies and the Need for Affirmative Sexuality”, University of the Pacific Law Review / Vol. 47.

Tuerkheimer, D. (2016), “Affirmative Consent”, 3 Ohio St. J. Crim. L. 441

Unit 4

UNODC, Handbook for the Judiciary on Effective Criminal Justice Responses to Gender-Based Violence Against Women and Girls, 2019. Ebook: https://www.unodc.org/pdf/criminal_justice/HB_for_the_Judiciary_on_Effective_Criminal_Justice_Women_and_Girls_E_ebook.pdf

Han, E. L. (2003), "Mandatory Arrest and No-Drop Policies: Victim Empowerment in Domestic Violence Cases", Boston College Third World Law Journal, Vol. 23, Issue 1.


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

26210 - Gender and Law


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
304 - Faculty of Law and Economics
331 - Faculty of Law
Study:
3041 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics
3312 - Bachelor's (Degree) Programme in Law
Subject:
26210 - Gender and Law
Credits:
5.0
Course:
669 - Minor in Gender Studies: 1
415 - Bachelor's degree in Law: 3
415 - Bachelor's degree in Law: 4
523 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics: 5
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Group 3: English
Group 4: English
Teachers:
Josep Capdeferro Pla, Arnau Nonell i Rodriguez, Ester Farnos Amoros, Raquel Montaner Fernandez
Teaching Period:
First Quarter o Second Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

The goal of the course is the analysis of relevant legal institutions from a gender perspective, putting into question the legal neutrality present in several fields. On one hand, the course deals with the legal treatment of the situation of women through the lens of history, paying special attention to Middle, Modern and Contemporary ages. On the other hand, the course focuses on the main institutions of private law -from contract law to personal and family law- given its capacity for perpetuating gender stereotypes and promoting dependency relationships. Finally, from a criminal law perspective, the course takes into consideration violence against women and legal protection against all forms of mistreatment, sexual violence and crimes against life.

Associated skills

"Gender and the Law" will allow students to get or reinforce skills on:

  • Analyzing legal, political and social phenomena from a gender perspective. 
  • Checking mutations on gender issues from the perspectives of identity and narrative. 
  • Appraising historical developments concerning gender items in legal terms.  
  • Evaluating recent and present partial achievements on gender issues.  
  • Comparing through the lens of gender roles of men and women in crucial aspects of life. 
  • Condemning historical (and recent!) phenomena of intolerance towards what were (still are?) considered gender and sexual deviations. 
  • Opening minds on gender theory and fighting against gender discrimination.

Learning outcomes

Coherently with the goal, the planning, the historical, cultural, civil and criminal contents, the bibliography and the skills of this course, students will develop an open a critical awareness of gender issues. It will help their contribution to the improvement of legal systems, in permanent evolution, and will empower them to identify, to repair and to stop any ongoing discrimination.

Sustainable Development Goals

# Gender Equality # Reduced Inequalities # Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Prerequisites

None: although this module belongs to the curriculum of the degree in Law, courses will be taught for students not necessarily familiarized with legal language.

Contents

Section I. Historical and cultural perspective

Unit 1. Identity: how gender was shaped in binary terms; religions and norms 

Unit 2. Alterity: queer individuals before the rules of majority 

Unit 3. Agency: (limited) civil faculties that women enjoyed in Western societies

Unit 4. Liability: women before Criminal Law and Criminal Courts 

Unit 5. Sorority: leaders and organizations pleading for women's cultural, political and social rights (19th-20th century)

 

Section II. Private Law from a Gender perspective

Unit 1. Introduction. The institutionalization and construction of gender: legal status of trans and intergender persons. Freedom not to contract and discrimination because of sexual orientation.

Unit 2. Marriage and civil partnerships from a gender perspective. Consequences of family breakdown: the never-ending debate on joint custody.

Unit 3. Sex, reproduction and parenthood. Feminist thoughts on abortion and surrogacy.

 

Section III. Criminal Law from a Gender perspective 

Unit 1. The concept of gender-based violence according to Criminal Law

Unit 2. About the crime of forced marriage and honor crimes: gender-based crimes?

Unit 3. Crimes against sexual freedom: The interpretation of criminal law and the relevance of consent?

Unit 4. Criminal justice system and victim's autonomy: no drop policies

 

Teaching Methods

Several teaching methods will interact:

1. Readings on recommended bibliography, legal sources and case-law;

2. Debates on readings;

3. Lecturing;

4. Text analysis;

5. Oral presentations;

Evaluation

The final grade of the course is obtained through ongoing assessment, which represents 100% of the final grade. This final grade is obtained by calculating the arithmetic average mark of each section of the course. Each section represents 33.3% of the final grade.

In each section of the course, students will be proposed two compulsory evaluable activities and will have their engagement in classroom discussions rewarded up to 20% of the grade.

The lecturer of each section will inform at the beginning of the course about the dynamics of these evaluable activities. Materials will be provided by lecturers at the Aula Global and/or available at the UPF library.  

Whoever at the end of the term obtains a grade lower than 5 of the total of the course and has participated in at least 5 of the evaluable activities of the whole course, will be able to resit the course at the beginning of the following term. This resit will consist in an oral exam, which will determine 100% of the grade of the course.

 

Bibliography and information resources

SECTION I

Compulsory readings:

BOES, Maria R., "'Dishonourable' youth, guilds, and the changed world view of sex, illegitimacy, and women in late-sixteenth-century Germany", in Continuity and Change, n. 18(3), pp. 345-372 (2003).

CAPDEFERRO, Josep, "Humble, but courageous. Modest women defending their rights in Early Modern Catalonia", in J. Vicent ESCARTÍ, Biografies invisibles / Invisible biographies, John Benjamins, 2021, pp. 91-103.

POSKA, Allyson M., "The Case for Agentic Gender Norms for Women in Early Modern Europe", in Gender & History, n. 30(2), pp. 345-365 (July 2018)

 

Elective readings: 

M. ARMSTRONG-PARTIDA, "Concubinage, illegitimacy and fatherhood: Urban masculinity in Late-medieval Barcelona", in Gender & History, vol. 31 No. 1 March 2019, pp. 195-219.

C. CRISTELLON, "Between Sacrament, Sin and Crime: Mixed Marriages and the Roman Church in Early Mod. Europe", in Gender & History, vol. 29 No. 3 November 2017, pp. 605-621.

L. DALLAVALLE, "The Moretti Family: Late Marriage, Bachelorhood and Domestic Authority in 17th cent. Venice", in Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 3 November 2015, pp. 684-702.

P. FONTES DA COSTA, “’Mediating Sexual Difference’: the Medical Understanding of HumanHermaphrodites in Eighteenth-century England”, in W. de Blécourt and C. Urborne, CulturalApproaches to the History of Medicine, Palgrave-Macmillan, 2004, pp. 127-147.

G. HOUBRE, "Hermaphroditism in Marriage Annulment Proceedings in 19th cent. France", in Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 1 April 2015, pp. 112-130.

L. LAUMONIER, "Meanings of Fatherhood in Late-Medieval Montpellier: Love, Care and the Exercise of Patria Potestas" Gender & History, vol. 27 No. 3 Novembre 2015, pp. 651-668.

S. MCDOUGALL, “The transformation of Adultery in France at the End of the Middle Ages”, in Law and History Review, vol. 32(3), August 2014, pp. 491-524.

J. MERRICK, "New sources and questions for research on sexual relations between men in 18th cent. France", in Gender & History, vol. 30 No. 1 March 2018, pp. 9-29.

J. ROELENS, "A woman like any other: Female Sodomy, Hermaphroditism and Witchcraft in 17th-Century Bruges", in Journal of Women's History, 29 (4), 2017, p. 11-34.

 

SECTION II

Unit 1

Selected readings:

  • BARTLETT, Katharine T., «Feminism and Family Law», Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 33 No. 3, 1999, pp. 475-500.
  • BARTLETT, Katharine T., «Gender Law: After Twenty-Five Years», 27 Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy 1-23 (2020).
  • ESTEVE ALGUACIL, Laura / NONELL RODRÍGUEZ, Arnau, «Good Intentions May Not Be Enough: The Spanish Draft BIll for the Equality of Trans and LGBTI people», VerfBlog, 2021/12/08: https://verfassungsblog.de/spanish-lgbtq-bill/

Case law:

  • German Federal Constitutional Court judgement of 10.10.2017 (1 BvR 2019/16).
  • Bull and Bull v. Hall and Preddy ([2013] UKSC 73).
  • Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd., et al. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission et al., Supreme Court of the United States of America, 4.6.2018, pp. 1-18.
  • Lee v. Ashers Baking Company ([2018] UKSC 49).
  • X and Y v. Romania, ECtHR, Nos. 2145/16 and 20607/16, 19 January 2021.

Supplementary readings:

  • BREMS, Eva / CANNOOT, Pieter / MOONEN, Toon (eds.), Protecting trans rights in the age of gender self-determination, Intersentia, 2020.
  • European Commission, Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers, Legal gender recognition in the EU. The journeys of trans people towards full equality, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2020, pp. 1-17 and 109-118.
  • Commissioner for Human Rights of the council of europe, Human Rights and Intersex People, Council of Europe, Strasbourg, 2015. 

Unit 2

Selected readings:

  • BARTLETT, Katharine T. / STACK, Carol B., «Joint Custody, Feminism and the Dependency Dilemma», Berkeley Woman’s Law Journal, 9, 1986.
  • JACOBS, Susan Beth, «The Hidden Gender Bias Behind “The Best Interest of the Child” Standard in Custody Decisions», Georgia State University Law Review, Vol. 13: Iss. 3, Article 5, 1996, pp. 845-901.
  • PALAZZO, Nausica, «Marriage Apostates: Why Heterosexuals Seek Same-Sex Registered Partnerships», Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2022.

Case law:

  • Obergefell et al. v. Hodges, Director, Ohio Department of Health, et al., Supreme Court of the United States of America, 26.6.2015, pp. 1-28.
  • Ratzenböck and Seydl v. Austria, ECtHR (5th section), 26.10.2017.
  • R (on the application of Steinfeld and Keidan) (Appellants) v. Secretary of State for the International Development (in substitution for the Home Secretary and the Education Secretary) (Respondent) ([2018] UKSC 32).
  • Atala Riffo and daughters v. Chile, IACtHR 24.2.2012.

Supplementary reading:

  • POLIKOFF, Nancy, "We Will Get What We Ask For: Why Lezalizing Gay and Lesbian Marriage Will Not Dismantle the Legal Structure of Gender in Every Marriage", 79 Virginia Law Review, 1993.

Unit 3

Selected readings:

  • ABRAMS, Paula L., «The Bad Mother: Stigma, Abortion and Surrogacy», The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Volume 43, Issue 2, 2015, pp. 179-191.
  • FARNÓS AMORÓS, Esther, «Surrogacy in Spain», in Scherpe, Jens M. / Fenton-Glynn, Claire / Kaan, Terry (eds.), Eastern and Western Perspectives on Surrogacy, Intersentia, Cambridge, 2019, pp. 59-82.
  • MARGARIA, Alice, «Trans Men Giving Birth and Reflections on Fatherhood: What to Expect?», International Journal of Law, Policy and The Family 34(3), 2020, pp. 1–22.
  • SATZ, Debra, «5. Markets in Women’s Reproductive Labor», Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, Oxford University Press, 2010.

Case law:

  • R (McConnell and YY) v Registrar General ([2020] EWCA Civ 559).
  • A.M. and others v. Russia, ECtHR (3rd section), 6.7.2021.
  • Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, Supreme Court of the United States, 24.6.2022.

Supplementary readings:

  • BOWMAN, Cynthia Grant / ROSENBURY, Laura A. / TUERKHEIMER, Deborah / YURACKO, Kimberly A., «Chapter 5: Women and Reproduction» in Feminist Jurisprudence: Cases and Materials, 5th ed., West Academic Publishing, 2018.
  • DETHLOFF, Nina / KAESLING, Katharina (eds.), Between sexuality, gender and reproduction. On the pluralisation of Family Forms, Intersentia, 2022.

SECTION III 

Unit 1

MacKinnon, C. A. (1983), “Feminism, Marxism, Method, and the State: Toward Feminist Jurisprudence”, Signs, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Summer, 1983), pp. 635-658. Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3173687

Butler, J., “ Sexual consent: some thoughts on psychoanalysis and law”, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1087: 178–205 (2006).

Etienne, M. (1995), “Addressing gender-based violence in a international context”, 18 Harv. Women's L.J. 139. 

Unit 2

Keyhani, N. (2013), “Honour crimes as gender-based violence in the UK: A critical assessment”, UCL Journal of Law and Jurisprudence

Toy-Cronin, B. A. (2010), “What is forced marriage? Towards a definition of forced marriage as a crime against humanity”, 19 Colum. J. Gender & L. 539.

Unit 3

Butler, J. (2011), “ Sexual consent: some thoughts on psychoanalysis and law”, Columbia Journal of Gender and the Law; New York, 21(2): 405–429.

Halley, J. (2016), "The Move to Affirmative Consent", Journal of Women in Culture and Society 2016, vol. 42, no. 1: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.1086/686904

MacKinnon, C. A. (1989), “Sexuality, Pornography, and Method: "Pleasure under Patriarchy"”, Ethics, Vol. 99, No. 2 (Jan., 1989), pp. 314-346. Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2381437

Jozkowski, K. N. (2016), “Barriers to Affirmative Consent Policies and the Need for Affirmative Sexuality”, University of the Pacific Law Review / Vol. 47.

Tuerkheimer, D. (2016), “Affirmative Consent”, 3 Ohio St. J. Crim. L. 441

Unit 4

UNODC, Handbook for the Judiciary on Effective Criminal Justice Responses to Gender-Based Violence Against Women and Girls, 2019. Ebook: https://www.unodc.org/pdf/criminal_justice/HB_for_the_Judiciary_on_Effective_Criminal_Justice_Women_and_Girls_E_ebook.pdf

Han, E. L. (2003), "Mandatory Arrest and No-Drop Policies: Victim Empowerment in Domestic Violence Cases", Boston College Third World Law Journal, Vol. 23, Issue 1.