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Academic Year: 2022/23

3313 - Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Public Prevention Policies

25926 - International Criminology


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
331 - Faculty of Law
Study:
3313 - Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Public Prevention Policies
Subject:
25926 - International Criminology
Ambit:
---
Credits:
5.0
Course:
3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Group 103: English
Group 104: English
Teachers:
Steven Kemp
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

This course is designed to prepare students for future research and professional activities in the English language and at the same time provide an overview of crime and justice issues which are international, transnational and/or global. The course analyses the nature, causes and responses to international and transnational crime and examines issues in the globalization of crime, including cybercrime, money laundering, terrorism, and drug trafficking, among others. Using data from international police organisations and crime and victimization surveys, this course will also explore patterns, trends and rates of crime and delinquency, and will discuss the possible sociological, demographic and economic explanations.  Examples are drawn from a variety of political and economical contexts. Throughout the course we will examine how the institutions that conform the criminal justice system differ in several countries, and how these are shaped depending on political, historical, economical and other macro forces.

The key aim of the course is to apply and expand the student’s knowledge of criminology and criminal justice and further their understanding of English to facilitate future opportunities for learning, research and employment. As the vast majority of academic works in criminology are published in English (an issue we will also comment upon), this course will enable students to prepare for participation in the anglicized/globalised world. 

It is important to note that the entire course will be delivered in English. 

Associated skills

  • Understanding of international/transnational crimes and criminological issues
  • Ability to communicate correctly in English
  • Ability to carry out academic presentations and written work in English 
  • Understanding of English terminology in criminology and criminal justice
  • Problem-solving and analytic skills.
  • Critical thinking and reasoning.
  • Teamwork.
  • Self-motivation and working independently.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of issues such as the globalization of crime, international crime statistics, or different forms of punishing offenders, among others.

2. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of different typologies of transnational and international crimes.

3. Research and present in English about international criminology issues. 

4. Analyse and evaluate crime policy and prevention strategies from a comparative perspective.

 

Sustainable Development Goals

By focusing the course on cross-border crime, students gain knowledge on issues that are important to SDG: different forms of trafficking, different organized crime groups, or how to strengthen transparency or collaboration through empirical analysis, amongst others. The course aims towards the education of a criminologist that can play an important role in governments, international bodies, and public and private entities fighting these international problems.

Prerequisites

None

Contents

  1. The globalization of crime
  2. Cross-national comparisons of crime statistics
  3. Punishment and cross-national measures of punitiveness
  4. Crime prevention, policing and criminal justice in an international context
  5. Transnational organized crime and terrorism
  6. Cybercrime
  7. White-collar crime and corporate crime
  8. International crimes: Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity

 

Seminar topics: 

  1. Comparative crime trends
  2. Comparative public and private responses to crime
  3. Preparing the presentations
  4. Student group presentations

Teaching Methods

This subject is taught through dynamic lectures as well as discussion seminars that focus on the practical application of the topics covered in the lectures. Activities include oral presentations, videos, practical case analysis, and debates.

 To successfully complete the subject, it is advisable to:

  1. Read the recommended text for each of the classes and seminars
  2. Participate in class. These are bidirectional and participation is highly valued.
  3. Review the online Global Classroom at least once a week. In the Global Classroom you will find the texts for each week and other resources that are useful for this subject and criminology in general.
  4. Submit assignments on the date indicated by the teacher. Assignments submitted after the deadline will NOT be accepted
  5. Display a mature attitude that is consistent with the professional world. This includes preparing for classes, arriving to class on time, not distracting classmates, not using mobile phones during class, and using a laptop in the classroom in a productive and respectful manner.

Evaluation

The subject will be evaluated as follows:

1. The final grade for the subject is obtained from two types of assessment activities: continuous assessment seminar grade (40%) and final exam (60%). The subject cannot be passed if you do not achieve at least a 4 (out of 10) in the final exam.

The continuous assessment grade:

  • Two group assignments related to seminars 1 and 2. 10% each.
  • One twenty-minute group oral presentation in seminar 4 that will be prepared in seminar 3 and outside the classroom. 20%: 10% individual mark, 10% overall group mark.
  • Attendance is mandatory at all seminars: if you are absent from a seminar without written justification, you will not be able to obtain the 40% of the grade that corresponds to the continuous assessment.
  • It is necessary to pass the continuous assessment in order to take the final exam, and therefore to pass the course.
  • Changes to seminar groups are generally not allowed. If completely necessary for a well-justified reason, the teacher must be notified in advance in writing. If the changes are for all four sessions, please contact the teacher during the first week of the term.

3. The final exam grade is based on a written exam that includes both multiple choice questions and short answer questions. 60%

4. Cheating during the exam means immediate expulsion from the exam and, therefore, failure of the subject, without prejudice to potential disciplinary sanctions. Any plagiarism detected in written work will lead to failure of the assignment, without prejudice to the corresponding disciplinary sanctions in application of current regulations.

5. Retaking the assessment activities

  • Only students who have failed the whole subject can participate in the resit process. It is not possible to participate to improve the final grade if the grade initially obtained is equal to or higher than 5.0.
  • Retaking the continuous assessment consists in redoing the failed assignment/s. Retaken assignments must be submitted on the day of the resit exam. The date of the resit examination will be communicated to the student through the relevant channels.

Bibliography and information resources

● Basic readings

Dammer, H. and Albanese, J.S. (2011). Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing.

Natarajan, M. (Ed.) (2011). International crime and justice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Reichel, P. (Ed.) (2005). Handbook of Transnational Crime and Justice. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

 

● Additional readings

Watts, R., Bessant, J. & Hil, R. (2008). International Criminology: A critical introduction. New York: Sage.

Sanders, T. O’Neill, M. Pitcher, J. Prostitution: sex work, policy and politics. Sage Publications

Beirne, P. (1991) Comparative Criminology: an annotated bibliography. Greenwood Press

Marggraf-Turley, R. (2000) Writing Essays: A Guide for Students in English and the Humanities. Routledge press

 

● Selected relevant journals

Global Crime

International Criminology

European Journal of Criminology

European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research

Trends in Organised Crime


Academic Year: 2022/23

3313 - Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Public Prevention Policies

25926 - International Criminology


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
331 - Faculty of Law
Study:
3313 - Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Public Prevention Policies
Subject:
25926 - International Criminology
Ambit:
---
Credits:
5.0
Course:
3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Group 103: English
Group 104: English
Teachers:
Steven Kemp
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

This course is designed to prepare students for future research and professional activities in the English language and at the same time provide an overview of crime and justice issues which are international, transnational and/or global. The course analyses the nature, causes and responses to international and transnational crime and examines issues in the globalization of crime, including cybercrime, money laundering, terrorism, and drug trafficking, among others. Using data from international police organisations and crime and victimization surveys, this course will also explore patterns, trends and rates of crime and delinquency, and will discuss the possible sociological, demographic and economic explanations.  Examples are drawn from a variety of political and economical contexts. Throughout the course we will examine how the institutions that conform the criminal justice system differ in several countries, and how these are shaped depending on political, historical, economical and other macro forces.

The key aim of the course is to apply and expand the student’s knowledge of criminology and criminal justice and further their understanding of English to facilitate future opportunities for learning, research and employment. As the vast majority of academic works in criminology are published in English (an issue we will also comment upon), this course will enable students to prepare for participation in the anglicized/globalised world. 

It is important to note that the entire course will be delivered in English. 

Associated skills

  • Understanding of international/transnational crimes and criminological issues
  • Ability to communicate correctly in English
  • Ability to carry out academic presentations and written work in English 
  • Understanding of English terminology in criminology and criminal justice
  • Problem-solving and analytic skills.
  • Critical thinking and reasoning.
  • Teamwork.
  • Self-motivation and working independently.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of issues such as the globalization of crime, international crime statistics, or different forms of punishing offenders, among others.

2. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of different typologies of transnational and international crimes.

3. Research and present in English about international criminology issues. 

4. Analyse and evaluate crime policy and prevention strategies from a comparative perspective.

 

Sustainable Development Goals

By focusing the course on cross-border crime, students gain knowledge on issues that are important to SDG: different forms of trafficking, different organized crime groups, or how to strengthen transparency or collaboration through empirical analysis, amongst others. The course aims towards the education of a criminologist that can play an important role in governments, international bodies, and public and private entities fighting these international problems.

Prerequisites

None

Contents

  1. The globalization of crime
  2. Cross-national comparisons of crime statistics
  3. Punishment and cross-national measures of punitiveness
  4. Crime prevention, policing and criminal justice in an international context
  5. Transnational organized crime and terrorism
  6. Cybercrime
  7. White-collar crime and corporate crime
  8. International crimes: Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity

 

Seminar topics: 

  1. Comparative crime trends
  2. Comparative public and private responses to crime
  3. Preparing the presentations
  4. Student group presentations

Teaching Methods

This subject is taught through dynamic lectures as well as discussion seminars that focus on the practical application of the topics covered in the lectures. Activities include oral presentations, videos, practical case analysis, and debates.

 To successfully complete the subject, it is advisable to:

  1. Read the recommended text for each of the classes and seminars
  2. Participate in class. These are bidirectional and participation is highly valued.
  3. Review the online Global Classroom at least once a week. In the Global Classroom you will find the texts for each week and other resources that are useful for this subject and criminology in general.
  4. Submit assignments on the date indicated by the teacher. Assignments submitted after the deadline will NOT be accepted
  5. Display a mature attitude that is consistent with the professional world. This includes preparing for classes, arriving to class on time, not distracting classmates, not using mobile phones during class, and using a laptop in the classroom in a productive and respectful manner.

Evaluation

The subject will be evaluated as follows:

1. The final grade for the subject is obtained from two types of assessment activities: continuous assessment seminar grade (40%) and final exam (60%). The subject cannot be passed if you do not achieve at least a 4 (out of 10) in the final exam.

The continuous assessment grade:

  • Two group assignments related to seminars 1 and 2. 10% each.
  • One twenty-minute group oral presentation in seminar 4 that will be prepared in seminar 3 and outside the classroom. 20%: 10% individual mark, 10% overall group mark.
  • Attendance is mandatory at all seminars: if you are absent from a seminar without written justification, you will not be able to obtain the 40% of the grade that corresponds to the continuous assessment.
  • It is necessary to pass the continuous assessment in order to take the final exam, and therefore to pass the course.
  • Changes to seminar groups are generally not allowed. If completely necessary for a well-justified reason, the teacher must be notified in advance in writing. If the changes are for all four sessions, please contact the teacher during the first week of the term.

3. The final exam grade is based on a written exam that includes both multiple choice questions and short answer questions. 60%

4. Cheating during the exam means immediate expulsion from the exam and, therefore, failure of the subject, without prejudice to potential disciplinary sanctions. Any plagiarism detected in written work will lead to failure of the assignment, without prejudice to the corresponding disciplinary sanctions in application of current regulations.

5. Retaking the assessment activities

  • Only students who have failed the whole subject can participate in the resit process. It is not possible to participate to improve the final grade if the grade initially obtained is equal to or higher than 5.0.
  • Retaking the continuous assessment consists in redoing the failed assignment/s. Retaken assignments must be submitted on the day of the resit exam. The date of the resit examination will be communicated to the student through the relevant channels.

Bibliography and information resources

● Basic readings

Dammer, H. and Albanese, J.S. (2011). Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing.

Natarajan, M. (Ed.) (2011). International crime and justice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Reichel, P. (Ed.) (2005). Handbook of Transnational Crime and Justice. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

 

● Additional readings

Watts, R., Bessant, J. & Hil, R. (2008). International Criminology: A critical introduction. New York: Sage.

Sanders, T. O’Neill, M. Pitcher, J. Prostitution: sex work, policy and politics. Sage Publications

Beirne, P. (1991) Comparative Criminology: an annotated bibliography. Greenwood Press

Marggraf-Turley, R. (2000) Writing Essays: A Guide for Students in English and the Humanities. Routledge press

 

● Selected relevant journals

Global Crime

International Criminology

European Journal of Criminology

European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research

Trends in Organised Crime


Academic Year: 2022/23

3313 - Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Public Prevention Policies

25926 - International Criminology


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
331 - Faculty of Law
Study:
3313 - Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Public Prevention Policies
Subject:
25926 - International Criminology
Ambit:
---
Credits:
5.0
Course:
3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Group 103: English
Group 104: English
Teachers:
Steven Kemp
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

This course is designed to prepare students for future research and professional activities in the English language and at the same time provide an overview of crime and justice issues which are international, transnational and/or global. The course analyses the nature, causes and responses to international and transnational crime and examines issues in the globalization of crime, including cybercrime, money laundering, terrorism, and drug trafficking, among others. Using data from international police organisations and crime and victimization surveys, this course will also explore patterns, trends and rates of crime and delinquency, and will discuss the possible sociological, demographic and economic explanations.  Examples are drawn from a variety of political and economical contexts. Throughout the course we will examine how the institutions that conform the criminal justice system differ in several countries, and how these are shaped depending on political, historical, economical and other macro forces.

The key aim of the course is to apply and expand the student’s knowledge of criminology and criminal justice and further their understanding of English to facilitate future opportunities for learning, research and employment. As the vast majority of academic works in criminology are published in English (an issue we will also comment upon), this course will enable students to prepare for participation in the anglicized/globalised world. 

It is important to note that the entire course will be delivered in English. 

Associated skills

  • Understanding of international/transnational crimes and criminological issues
  • Ability to communicate correctly in English
  • Ability to carry out academic presentations and written work in English 
  • Understanding of English terminology in criminology and criminal justice
  • Problem-solving and analytic skills.
  • Critical thinking and reasoning.
  • Teamwork.
  • Self-motivation and working independently.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of issues such as the globalization of crime, international crime statistics, or different forms of punishing offenders, among others.

2. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of different typologies of transnational and international crimes.

3. Research and present in English about international criminology issues. 

4. Analyse and evaluate crime policy and prevention strategies from a comparative perspective.

 

Sustainable Development Goals

By focusing the course on cross-border crime, students gain knowledge on issues that are important to SDG: different forms of trafficking, different organized crime groups, or how to strengthen transparency or collaboration through empirical analysis, amongst others. The course aims towards the education of a criminologist that can play an important role in governments, international bodies, and public and private entities fighting these international problems.

Prerequisites

None

Contents

  1. The globalization of crime
  2. Cross-national comparisons of crime statistics
  3. Punishment and cross-national measures of punitiveness
  4. Crime prevention, policing and criminal justice in an international context
  5. Transnational organized crime and terrorism
  6. Cybercrime
  7. White-collar crime and corporate crime
  8. International crimes: Genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity

 

Seminar topics: 

  1. Comparative crime trends
  2. Comparative public and private responses to crime
  3. Preparing the presentations
  4. Student group presentations

Teaching Methods

This subject is taught through dynamic lectures as well as discussion seminars that focus on the practical application of the topics covered in the lectures. Activities include oral presentations, videos, practical case analysis, and debates.

 To successfully complete the subject, it is advisable to:

  1. Read the recommended text for each of the classes and seminars
  2. Participate in class. These are bidirectional and participation is highly valued.
  3. Review the online Global Classroom at least once a week. In the Global Classroom you will find the texts for each week and other resources that are useful for this subject and criminology in general.
  4. Submit assignments on the date indicated by the teacher. Assignments submitted after the deadline will NOT be accepted
  5. Display a mature attitude that is consistent with the professional world. This includes preparing for classes, arriving to class on time, not distracting classmates, not using mobile phones during class, and using a laptop in the classroom in a productive and respectful manner.

Evaluation

The subject will be evaluated as follows:

1. The final grade for the subject is obtained from two types of assessment activities: continuous assessment seminar grade (40%) and final exam (60%). The subject cannot be passed if you do not achieve at least a 4 (out of 10) in the final exam.

The continuous assessment grade:

  • Two group assignments related to seminars 1 and 2. 10% each.
  • One twenty-minute group oral presentation in seminar 4 that will be prepared in seminar 3 and outside the classroom. 20%: 10% individual mark, 10% overall group mark.
  • Attendance is mandatory at all seminars: if you are absent from a seminar without written justification, you will not be able to obtain the 40% of the grade that corresponds to the continuous assessment.
  • It is necessary to pass the continuous assessment in order to take the final exam, and therefore to pass the course.
  • Changes to seminar groups are generally not allowed. If completely necessary for a well-justified reason, the teacher must be notified in advance in writing. If the changes are for all four sessions, please contact the teacher during the first week of the term.

3. The final exam grade is based on a written exam that includes both multiple choice questions and short answer questions. 60%

4. Cheating during the exam means immediate expulsion from the exam and, therefore, failure of the subject, without prejudice to potential disciplinary sanctions. Any plagiarism detected in written work will lead to failure of the assignment, without prejudice to the corresponding disciplinary sanctions in application of current regulations.

5. Retaking the assessment activities

  • Only students who have failed the whole subject can participate in the resit process. It is not possible to participate to improve the final grade if the grade initially obtained is equal to or higher than 5.0.
  • Retaking the continuous assessment consists in redoing the failed assignment/s. Retaken assignments must be submitted on the day of the resit exam. The date of the resit examination will be communicated to the student through the relevant channels.

Bibliography and information resources

● Basic readings

Dammer, H. and Albanese, J.S. (2011). Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing.

Natarajan, M. (Ed.) (2011). International crime and justice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Reichel, P. (Ed.) (2005). Handbook of Transnational Crime and Justice. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

 

● Additional readings

Watts, R., Bessant, J. & Hil, R. (2008). International Criminology: A critical introduction. New York: Sage.

Sanders, T. O’Neill, M. Pitcher, J. Prostitution: sex work, policy and politics. Sage Publications

Beirne, P. (1991) Comparative Criminology: an annotated bibliography. Greenwood Press

Marggraf-Turley, R. (2000) Writing Essays: A Guide for Students in English and the Humanities. Routledge press

 

● Selected relevant journals

Global Crime

International Criminology

European Journal of Criminology

European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research

Trends in Organised Crime