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Academic Year: 2022/23

3391 - Bachelor's degree in Political and Administration Sciences

25049 - Environment, Development and Justice


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
339 - Faculty of Political and Social Sciences
Study:
3391 - Bachelor's degree in Political and Administration Sciences
Subject:
25049 - Environment, Development and Justice
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
4 and 3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Harold Mera Leon
Teaching Period:
Second quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

This course will critically inquire in the construction of ‘development’ as a concept geographically applied and intrinsically link to the capitalism’s expansion.  It considers the concept as an intentional economic and political project derived from colonialism and mercantilism. It also questions its outcomes in terms of reproduction of social inequalities and environmental consequences at global, national, and local scales.

Is expected that students develop a critical understanding of environmental conditions as an outcome inextricably connected to political, economic, and social processes based on modified structures of society under the rule of market. Additionally, the course aims to provide conceptual and technical tools as well as empirical knowledge to understand the origins and (re)production of uneven geographical development in the contemporary world.

The first part of the course will review critical theories of development, wherein students will become familiar with a range of concepts for understanding and unpacking the processes, mechanisms and discourses of ‘development’ and their relationships with global inequality and environmental instability. In the second part of the course, students will learn how development is fundamentally a “globalization project”, in order to reorganize global labour chains and mobilizes natural resources, while shaping unequal and unsustainable human-environment and socioeconomic relationships. The third part will review the systematic alternatives and critics of the sustainable project.

The course’s key concepts will be illustrated through a range of selected case studies from diverse geographical settings. By critically engaging with these case studies, students will become aware of the manner trough which uneven geographical development worked out and affected local ecosystems and socioeconomic structures, and how groups all over world organize and mobilize to resist and revert these processes. For that purpose, the curse will implement am ABP (Approach Based in Projects) which aims to align the subject’s contents to 17 the Sustainable Development Goals through a more practical and real analysis of problematic scenarios embedded in the 17 SDG’s or the Global Agenda for 2030.

Associated skills

This course is part of the optional courses itinerary “citizenship and government” that together, develops the following competencies:

 

BASIC SKILLS:

CB2. That students can apply their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional manner and have competences typically demonstrated through devising and sustaining arguments and solving problems within their field of study.

CB3. That students have the ability to gather and interpret relevant data (usually within their field of study) to inform judgments that include reflection on relevant social, scientific or ethical.

CB4. That students can communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

CB5. That students have developed those skills needed to undertake further studies with a high degree of autonomy.

 

GENERAL SKILLS:

CG1. Capacity for analysis and synthesis.

CG3. Knowledge of a second language.

CG4. Basic computer skills.

CG6. Interpersonal skills.

CG7. Ability to work in an interdisciplinary team.

CG10. Research skills.

CG12. Ability to generate new ideas (creativity).

CG13. Leadership.

CG15. Project design and management.

 

TRANSVERSAL SKILLS:

CT1. Identify and analyze critically gender inequality and its intersection with other axes of inequality.

 

SPECIFIC SKILLS:

CE2. Analyze the structure and functioning of political systems.

CE6. Identify citizen behavior and democratic values.

CE7. Analyze the functioning of electoral processes.

CE17. Apply the methods and techniques of political and social research.

CE18. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data.

CE19. Examine the techniques of political communication.

CE20. Categorize information and communication technologies (ICT) and analyze their impact on the political system.

Learning outcomes

ADDITIONAL SKILLS ABP-SDG’s:

1. Systematic thinking. Noticing and understanding the systematic interconnections and dependency within complex systems where we must face uncertainty.

2. Normative comprehension. To understand and think deeply concerning the norms and values underlying the human institutions but furthermore, to recognize the bargains game of values, principles and targets regarding sustainability and social justice, embedded in complex scenarios where interests and contradictions are always present. 

3. Prevention perspective. To understand and assess multiple futures – possible, probable and desirable-. Hence, to learn how use imagination for the creation of potential futures with caution concerning the consequences so plan how to deal with potential risks.

4. Strategic thinking. To jointly create and apply collective actions and innovation previously tested aiming to increase sustainability and social justices at different levels (Global – Local).

5. Cooperation attitude. To learn from others and respect other’s needs, perspectives, and actions through the comprehension of diversity so contradictions and conflicts could be resolve in a emphatic and peaceful manner within each group.

6. Critical thinking. To question norms, dogma, paradigms and practices based on those values need to transform the unsustainable and unfair reality of the world. Take a position concerning the harmless effects of no action.

7. Awareness: To be sure that a problematic situation exists in worldwide society reflected in the high levels of inequality and the unsustainable path of economic growth above other human values.

Sustainable Development Goals

Considering the relevance of sustainable development for the construction and comprehension of the development concept the subject touches different aspects of the SDG’s without addressing directly to them but within the current concerns of international and national governance structures. Hence, the subject content might refer to most of them without deep or specific study of any of them.
 
ODS 1: Fi de la pobresa / No poverty
ODS 2: Fam zero / Zero hunger
ODS 3: Salut i Benestar / Good health and well-being
ODS 4: Educació de qualitat / Quality education
ODS 5: Igualtat de gènere / Gender equality
ODS 6: Aigua neta i sanejament / Clean water and sanitation
ODS 7: Energia assequible i no contaminant / Affordable and clean energy
ODS 8: Treball decent i creixement economic / Decent work and economic growth
ODS 9: Indústria, innovació i infraestructura / Industry, innovation and infrastructure
ODS 10: Reducció de les desigualtats / Reduced inequalities
ODS 11: Ciutats i comunitats sostenibles / Sustainable cities and communities
ODS 12: Consum i producció responsables / Responsible consumption and production
ODS 13: Acció climàtica / Climate action
ODS 14: Vida submarina / Life below water
ODS 15: Vida Terrestre / Life on land
ODS 16: Pau, Justícia i institucions sòlides / Peace, justice and strong institutions
ODS 17: Aliança pels objectius / Partnerships for the goals

Contents

Session 1: Course introduction: The link between development environment and social injustice

  • Course Overview
  • Approaching to “development” concept Phill Mc Michael
  • Approaching to “social justice” concept Amartya Sen
  • Approaching to “political ecology” concept Paul Robbins
  • The development project as an economic and environmental construction project of economic and political elites
  • A notion of governance
  • Theory and Reality – Complexity Interdependence
  • Social Change

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Introduction and Chapter 1

Additional readings: Perreault (2009); Robbins (2012), Chapter 1.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

PART I – CRITICAL THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

 

Session 2: Colonialism, and the roots of the development project

  • Colonialism, the division of labor
  • Social Reorganization
  • Decolonization
  • Decolonization and Development
  • Ingredients of the Development Project
  • Framing the Development Project
  • Economic Nationalism

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017) Chapter 2

Additional readings: Davis (2001) Chapter 9, Davis (2004), Escobar (2012) Chapter 2, Ferguson and Lohman (1994)

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

Session 3: International Framework

  • The International Framework
  • Remarking the International Division of Labor
  • The Food Aid Regime
  • Remarking Third World Agriculture

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017) Chapter 3.

Additional readings: Carney (2004); Shiva (1991) Chapter 1.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. First Case Study.

 

Session 4: Globalizing Developments

  • The World Industrialization in Context
  • Agriculture Globalization
  • Global Finance

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 4.

 

Additional readings: Peet and Hartwick (2015), pp. 90–10

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

PART II - THE GLOBALIZATION PROJECT

 

Session 5: The Globalization Project (1980’s to 2000’s)

  • Instituting the Globalization Project
  • The Debt Regime
  • The Globalization Project
  • Global Governance
  • The World Trade Organization

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 5.

 

Additional readings: Conde and Kallis (2012).

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 6: The Globalization Project in Practice

  • Poverty Governance
  • Outsourcing
  • Global Labor-Sourcing Politics
  • Displacement
  • Informalization
  • Global Recolonization

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 6.

 

Additional readings: Karriem (2009); Peet and Hartwick (2015), pp- 310-324

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 7: Global Counter movements

  • Environmentalism
  • Feminism
  • Food Soveringty

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 7.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

PART III - Millennial Reckonings (2000’s to Present)

 

Session 8: The Globalization Project in Crises

  •  Social Crises Feminism
  • Legitimacy Crises
  • Geopolitical Transitions
  • Ecological Crises

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 9.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 9: Sustainable Development

  • The Challenge of Climate Change
  • Responses to the Sustainability Challenge
  • Public Interventions
  • Grassroots Developments

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 9.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 10: Rethinking Development  

  • Development in the Gear of Social Change
  • Parading Change

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 10.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Conclusion.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

Teaching Methods

This course combines lectures, group work and individual participation. There will be 10 lecture classes, and 9 cases studies (ABP), plus one final evaluation session.

The sessions will combine a ‘traditional’ lecture format with the Approach Based in Problems.

The professor will explain important points related to the topic, with classroom activities (e.g., based on watching short videos or reading a short text in the class and answering questions related to it). 

Approach Based in Problem (ABP). In the second part of the class the group work will take place through cases studies the creation of solutions to specific problematic. Those problems entitles the 17 SDG’s including gender and marginalization situations.

Student participation is highly encouraged and will be sought through questions and discussions with the students.

 

Gender perspective

 The subject identifies and explains social marginalization mechanisms links to the colonial era, those through which women's well-being has been affected unfairly. Likewise, the evolution in a further accumulation of wealth and exploitation of human resources diminish women's labor conditions and deep the gap (wage and fields) in the labour market. Hence, the subject addresses the issue of defeminization of labor markets in specific sectors of the national and international economy and the logic of global farms, global factories, export production zones, and overall logic of reducing production costs cost of women health and well-being. Additionally, the subject highlights the importance of feminism as a grassroots, resistance movement through which equity, sustainability, food sovereignty well-being are likely to increase.

 

Sessions

In-class activities

Out-of-class activities

In class hours

Out-of-class hours

Session 1

Lecture

 

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 2

Lecture – Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 3

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Studyn

3

6

Session 4

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 5

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 6

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 7

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 8

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 9

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 10

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Hours

30

60

Study hours for evaluations

 

10

Total hours

100

Evaluation

This course includes two evaluation activities. Group Cases Studies and Final Evaluation.

 

ABP - Case studies

 Cases studies will be read and resolve by each group (4 members) during certain sessions. The case studies will be related to the topic studied within each session. The work should be uploaded in the aula global considering the deadline, same day of the lecture class. The answer to the case study must be in 500 words max.

- Stick to the word limit; state the word count in the document (especially if saving the file in PDF)

- Write in your own words, paraphrase the authors' arguments rather than citing them directly

- Write in plain English, but use rigorous and precise language 

- Show me that you've read texts carefully, research and discuss within the group

- Stick to the texts; resist the temptation to bring in more material or personal reflections (you're welcome to do that in the class!)

 

Final Exam

Final exam of 20 questions regarding the lecture class studied content.

 

Assessment`s Weights

 

Students will be evaluated two types of evaluation tools:

  • ABP - Case studies and performance in the classroom; this is directly connected with having done the readings that will be provided for each class and working in resolving the Problematic within each cases study
  • Performance on a Final Exam

 

In order to get a mark for this course, students must participate in the four evaluation sessions and write two essays (see below). The following table outlines the contribution of each evaluation to student final mark.

 

Evaluation tool

% of final mark

ABP - Case Studies - Group Work

40%

Final Exam

60%

 

 

Retest

Those failing the course will be given a second chance to pass the course by taking a resit exam (retest). Only those who have attended evaluation sessions and have handed in at least the 7 cases studies will be able to retest to pass the course.

Bibliography and information resources

Guarnieri, Eleonora and Rainer H. (2021) Colonialism and female empowerment: A two – sided legacy. In: Journal of Development Economics. Vol 151. June 2021. Colonialism and female empowerment: A two-sided legacy - ScienceDirect

Andreucci, Diego, y Giorgos Kallis. «Governmentality, Development and the Violence of Natural Resource Extraction in Peru». Ecological Economics 134 (april de 2017): 95-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.01.003.

Bernstein, Steven. The Compromise of Liberal Environmentalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Camargo, Alejandro, y Diana Ojeda. «Ambivalent desires: State formation and dispossession in the face of climate crisis». Political Geography 60 (1 de septiembre de 2017): 57-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polgeo.2017.04.003.

Escobar, Arturo. Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2008.

Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development. The Making and Unmaking of the Third World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Ferguson, James, y Lohman, Larry. «The Anti-Politics Machine. “Development” and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho». The Ecologist 24, n.o 5 (octubre de 1994).

Galeano, Eduardo. Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent. 25th anniversary ed. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1997.

Goldman, Michael. «Constructing an Environmental State: Eco-Governmentality and Other Transnational Practices of a ‘Green’ World Bank». Social Problems 48, n.o 4 (2001): 499-523. https://doi.org/10.1525/sp.2001.48.4.499.

———. Imperial Nature: The World Bank and Struggles for Social Justice in the Age of Globalization. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2005.

Harvey, David. The New Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Klein, Naomi. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate. London: Penguin, 2014.

McMichael, P. Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective. Sociology for a New Century Series. London: SAGE Publications, 2012.

Patel, Raj, y Jason W. Moore. A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things. A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2017.

Peet, R., y E. Hartwick. Theories of Development, Third Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives. New York and London: Guilford Publications, 2015.

Peet, Richard. Unholy Trinity: The IMF, World Bank and WTO. Second. London: Zed Books, 2009.

Peluso, Nancy Lee, y Michael Watts, eds. Violent Environments. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.

Perreault, Tom. «Environment and Development». En A Companion to Environmental Geography, editado por Noel Castree, David Demeritt, Diana Liverman, y Bruce Rhoads, 432-60. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

Prudham, Scott. «Pimping Climate Change: Richard Branson, Global Warming, and the Performance of Green Capitalism. Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space 41, n.o 7 (1 de julio de 2009): 1594-1613. https://doi.org/10.1068/a4071.

Robbins, Paul. Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction. Second Edition. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.

Sachs, Wolfgang, ed. The Development Dictionary. A Guide to Knowledge as Power. London and New Jersey: Zed Books, 1992.

Taylor, Marcus. The Political Ecology of Climate Change Adaptation. Livelihoods, agrarian change and the conflicts of development. London and New York: Routledge, 2015.

Watts, Michael. «Petro-Violence: Community, Extraction, and Political Ecology of a Mythic Commodity». En Violent Environments, editado por Nancy Lee Peluso y Michael Watts, 189-212. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.


Academic Year: 2022/23

3391 - Bachelor's degree in Political and Administration Sciences

25049 - Environment, Development and Justice


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
339 - Faculty of Political and Social Sciences
Study:
3391 - Bachelor's degree in Political and Administration Sciences
Subject:
25049 - Environment, Development and Justice
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
4 and 3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Harold Mera Leon
Teaching Period:
Second quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

This course will critically inquire in the construction of ‘development’ as a concept geographically applied and intrinsically link to the capitalism’s expansion.  It considers the concept as an intentional economic and political project derived from colonialism and mercantilism. It also questions its outcomes in terms of reproduction of social inequalities and environmental consequences at global, national, and local scales.

Is expected that students develop a critical understanding of environmental conditions as an outcome inextricably connected to political, economic, and social processes based on modified structures of society under the rule of market. Additionally, the course aims to provide conceptual and technical tools as well as empirical knowledge to understand the origins and (re)production of uneven geographical development in the contemporary world.

The first part of the course will review critical theories of development, wherein students will become familiar with a range of concepts for understanding and unpacking the processes, mechanisms and discourses of ‘development’ and their relationships with global inequality and environmental instability. In the second part of the course, students will learn how development is fundamentally a “globalization project”, in order to reorganize global labour chains and mobilizes natural resources, while shaping unequal and unsustainable human-environment and socioeconomic relationships. The third part will review the systematic alternatives and critics of the sustainable project.

The course’s key concepts will be illustrated through a range of selected case studies from diverse geographical settings. By critically engaging with these case studies, students will become aware of the manner trough which uneven geographical development worked out and affected local ecosystems and socioeconomic structures, and how groups all over world organize and mobilize to resist and revert these processes. For that purpose, the curse will implement am ABP (Approach Based in Projects) which aims to align the subject’s contents to 17 the Sustainable Development Goals through a more practical and real analysis of problematic scenarios embedded in the 17 SDG’s or the Global Agenda for 2030.

Associated skills

This course is part of the optional courses itinerary “citizenship and government” that together, develops the following competencies:

 

BASIC SKILLS:

CB2. That students can apply their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional manner and have competences typically demonstrated through devising and sustaining arguments and solving problems within their field of study.

CB3. That students have the ability to gather and interpret relevant data (usually within their field of study) to inform judgments that include reflection on relevant social, scientific or ethical.

CB4. That students can communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

CB5. That students have developed those skills needed to undertake further studies with a high degree of autonomy.

 

GENERAL SKILLS:

CG1. Capacity for analysis and synthesis.

CG3. Knowledge of a second language.

CG4. Basic computer skills.

CG6. Interpersonal skills.

CG7. Ability to work in an interdisciplinary team.

CG10. Research skills.

CG12. Ability to generate new ideas (creativity).

CG13. Leadership.

CG15. Project design and management.

 

TRANSVERSAL SKILLS:

CT1. Identify and analyze critically gender inequality and its intersection with other axes of inequality.

 

SPECIFIC SKILLS:

CE2. Analyze the structure and functioning of political systems.

CE6. Identify citizen behavior and democratic values.

CE7. Analyze the functioning of electoral processes.

CE17. Apply the methods and techniques of political and social research.

CE18. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data.

CE19. Examine the techniques of political communication.

CE20. Categorize information and communication technologies (ICT) and analyze their impact on the political system.

Learning outcomes

ADDITIONAL SKILLS ABP-SDG’s:

1. Systematic thinking. Noticing and understanding the systematic interconnections and dependency within complex systems where we must face uncertainty.

2. Normative comprehension. To understand and think deeply concerning the norms and values underlying the human institutions but furthermore, to recognize the bargains game of values, principles and targets regarding sustainability and social justice, embedded in complex scenarios where interests and contradictions are always present. 

3. Prevention perspective. To understand and assess multiple futures – possible, probable and desirable-. Hence, to learn how use imagination for the creation of potential futures with caution concerning the consequences so plan how to deal with potential risks.

4. Strategic thinking. To jointly create and apply collective actions and innovation previously tested aiming to increase sustainability and social justices at different levels (Global – Local).

5. Cooperation attitude. To learn from others and respect other’s needs, perspectives, and actions through the comprehension of diversity so contradictions and conflicts could be resolve in a emphatic and peaceful manner within each group.

6. Critical thinking. To question norms, dogma, paradigms and practices based on those values need to transform the unsustainable and unfair reality of the world. Take a position concerning the harmless effects of no action.

7. Awareness: To be sure that a problematic situation exists in worldwide society reflected in the high levels of inequality and the unsustainable path of economic growth above other human values.

Sustainable Development Goals

Considering the relevance of sustainable development for the construction and comprehension of the development concept the subject touches different aspects of the SDG’s without addressing directly to them but within the current concerns of international and national governance structures. Hence, the subject content might refer to most of them without deep or specific study of any of them.
 
ODS 1: Fi de la pobresa / No poverty
ODS 2: Fam zero / Zero hunger
ODS 3: Salut i Benestar / Good health and well-being
ODS 4: Educació de qualitat / Quality education
ODS 5: Igualtat de gènere / Gender equality
ODS 6: Aigua neta i sanejament / Clean water and sanitation
ODS 7: Energia assequible i no contaminant / Affordable and clean energy
ODS 8: Treball decent i creixement economic / Decent work and economic growth
ODS 9: Indústria, innovació i infraestructura / Industry, innovation and infrastructure
ODS 10: Reducció de les desigualtats / Reduced inequalities
ODS 11: Ciutats i comunitats sostenibles / Sustainable cities and communities
ODS 12: Consum i producció responsables / Responsible consumption and production
ODS 13: Acció climàtica / Climate action
ODS 14: Vida submarina / Life below water
ODS 15: Vida Terrestre / Life on land
ODS 16: Pau, Justícia i institucions sòlides / Peace, justice and strong institutions
ODS 17: Aliança pels objectius / Partnerships for the goals

Contents

Session 1: Course introduction: The link between development environment and social injustice

  • Course Overview
  • Approaching to “development” concept Phill Mc Michael
  • Approaching to “social justice” concept Amartya Sen
  • Approaching to “political ecology” concept Paul Robbins
  • The development project as an economic and environmental construction project of economic and political elites
  • A notion of governance
  • Theory and Reality – Complexity Interdependence
  • Social Change

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Introduction and Chapter 1

Additional readings: Perreault (2009); Robbins (2012), Chapter 1.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

PART I – CRITICAL THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

 

Session 2: Colonialism, and the roots of the development project

  • Colonialism, the division of labor
  • Social Reorganization
  • Decolonization
  • Decolonization and Development
  • Ingredients of the Development Project
  • Framing the Development Project
  • Economic Nationalism

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017) Chapter 2

Additional readings: Davis (2001) Chapter 9, Davis (2004), Escobar (2012) Chapter 2, Ferguson and Lohman (1994)

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

Session 3: International Framework

  • The International Framework
  • Remarking the International Division of Labor
  • The Food Aid Regime
  • Remarking Third World Agriculture

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017) Chapter 3.

Additional readings: Carney (2004); Shiva (1991) Chapter 1.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. First Case Study.

 

Session 4: Globalizing Developments

  • The World Industrialization in Context
  • Agriculture Globalization
  • Global Finance

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 4.

 

Additional readings: Peet and Hartwick (2015), pp. 90–10

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

PART II - THE GLOBALIZATION PROJECT

 

Session 5: The Globalization Project (1980’s to 2000’s)

  • Instituting the Globalization Project
  • The Debt Regime
  • The Globalization Project
  • Global Governance
  • The World Trade Organization

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 5.

 

Additional readings: Conde and Kallis (2012).

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 6: The Globalization Project in Practice

  • Poverty Governance
  • Outsourcing
  • Global Labor-Sourcing Politics
  • Displacement
  • Informalization
  • Global Recolonization

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 6.

 

Additional readings: Karriem (2009); Peet and Hartwick (2015), pp- 310-324

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 7: Global Counter movements

  • Environmentalism
  • Feminism
  • Food Soveringty

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 7.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

PART III - Millennial Reckonings (2000’s to Present)

 

Session 8: The Globalization Project in Crises

  •  Social Crises Feminism
  • Legitimacy Crises
  • Geopolitical Transitions
  • Ecological Crises

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 9.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 9: Sustainable Development

  • The Challenge of Climate Change
  • Responses to the Sustainability Challenge
  • Public Interventions
  • Grassroots Developments

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 9.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 10: Rethinking Development  

  • Development in the Gear of Social Change
  • Parading Change

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 10.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Conclusion.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

Teaching Methods

This course combines lectures, group work and individual participation. There will be 10 lecture classes, and 9 cases studies (ABP), plus one final evaluation session.

The sessions will combine a ‘traditional’ lecture format with the Approach Based in Problems.

The professor will explain important points related to the topic, with classroom activities (e.g., based on watching short videos or reading a short text in the class and answering questions related to it). 

Approach Based in Problem (ABP). In the second part of the class the group work will take place through cases studies the creation of solutions to specific problematic. Those problems entitles the 17 SDG’s including gender and marginalization situations.

Student participation is highly encouraged and will be sought through questions and discussions with the students.

 

Gender perspective

 The subject identifies and explains social marginalization mechanisms links to the colonial era, those through which women's well-being has been affected unfairly. Likewise, the evolution in a further accumulation of wealth and exploitation of human resources diminish women's labor conditions and deep the gap (wage and fields) in the labour market. Hence, the subject addresses the issue of defeminization of labor markets in specific sectors of the national and international economy and the logic of global farms, global factories, export production zones, and overall logic of reducing production costs cost of women health and well-being. Additionally, the subject highlights the importance of feminism as a grassroots, resistance movement through which equity, sustainability, food sovereignty well-being are likely to increase.

 

Sessions

In-class activities

Out-of-class activities

In class hours

Out-of-class hours

Session 1

Lecture

 

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 2

Lecture – Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 3

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Studyn

3

6

Session 4

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 5

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 6

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 7

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 8

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 9

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 10

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Hours

30

60

Study hours for evaluations

 

10

Total hours

100

Evaluation

This course includes two evaluation activities. Group Cases Studies and Final Evaluation.

 

ABP - Case studies

 Cases studies will be read and resolve by each group (4 members) during certain sessions. The case studies will be related to the topic studied within each session. The work should be uploaded in the aula global considering the deadline, same day of the lecture class. The answer to the case study must be in 500 words max.

- Stick to the word limit; state the word count in the document (especially if saving the file in PDF)

- Write in your own words, paraphrase the authors' arguments rather than citing them directly

- Write in plain English, but use rigorous and precise language 

- Show me that you've read texts carefully, research and discuss within the group

- Stick to the texts; resist the temptation to bring in more material or personal reflections (you're welcome to do that in the class!)

 

Final Exam

Final exam of 20 questions regarding the lecture class studied content.

 

Assessment`s Weights

 

Students will be evaluated two types of evaluation tools:

  • ABP - Case studies and performance in the classroom; this is directly connected with having done the readings that will be provided for each class and working in resolving the Problematic within each cases study
  • Performance on a Final Exam

 

In order to get a mark for this course, students must participate in the four evaluation sessions and write two essays (see below). The following table outlines the contribution of each evaluation to student final mark.

 

Evaluation tool

% of final mark

ABP - Case Studies - Group Work

40%

Final Exam

60%

 

 

Retest

Those failing the course will be given a second chance to pass the course by taking a resit exam (retest). Only those who have attended evaluation sessions and have handed in at least the 7 cases studies will be able to retest to pass the course.

Bibliography and information resources

Guarnieri, Eleonora and Rainer H. (2021) Colonialism and female empowerment: A two – sided legacy. In: Journal of Development Economics. Vol 151. June 2021. Colonialism and female empowerment: A two-sided legacy - ScienceDirect

Andreucci, Diego, y Giorgos Kallis. «Governmentality, Development and the Violence of Natural Resource Extraction in Peru». Ecological Economics 134 (april de 2017): 95-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.01.003.

Bernstein, Steven. The Compromise of Liberal Environmentalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Camargo, Alejandro, y Diana Ojeda. «Ambivalent desires: State formation and dispossession in the face of climate crisis». Political Geography 60 (1 de septiembre de 2017): 57-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polgeo.2017.04.003.

Escobar, Arturo. Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2008.

Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development. The Making and Unmaking of the Third World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Ferguson, James, y Lohman, Larry. «The Anti-Politics Machine. “Development” and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho». The Ecologist 24, n.o 5 (octubre de 1994).

Galeano, Eduardo. Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent. 25th anniversary ed. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1997.

Goldman, Michael. «Constructing an Environmental State: Eco-Governmentality and Other Transnational Practices of a ‘Green’ World Bank». Social Problems 48, n.o 4 (2001): 499-523. https://doi.org/10.1525/sp.2001.48.4.499.

———. Imperial Nature: The World Bank and Struggles for Social Justice in the Age of Globalization. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2005.

Harvey, David. The New Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Klein, Naomi. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate. London: Penguin, 2014.

McMichael, P. Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective. Sociology for a New Century Series. London: SAGE Publications, 2012.

Patel, Raj, y Jason W. Moore. A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things. A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2017.

Peet, R., y E. Hartwick. Theories of Development, Third Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives. New York and London: Guilford Publications, 2015.

Peet, Richard. Unholy Trinity: The IMF, World Bank and WTO. Second. London: Zed Books, 2009.

Peluso, Nancy Lee, y Michael Watts, eds. Violent Environments. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.

Perreault, Tom. «Environment and Development». En A Companion to Environmental Geography, editado por Noel Castree, David Demeritt, Diana Liverman, y Bruce Rhoads, 432-60. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

Prudham, Scott. «Pimping Climate Change: Richard Branson, Global Warming, and the Performance of Green Capitalism. Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space 41, n.o 7 (1 de julio de 2009): 1594-1613. https://doi.org/10.1068/a4071.

Robbins, Paul. Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction. Second Edition. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.

Sachs, Wolfgang, ed. The Development Dictionary. A Guide to Knowledge as Power. London and New Jersey: Zed Books, 1992.

Taylor, Marcus. The Political Ecology of Climate Change Adaptation. Livelihoods, agrarian change and the conflicts of development. London and New York: Routledge, 2015.

Watts, Michael. «Petro-Violence: Community, Extraction, and Political Ecology of a Mythic Commodity». En Violent Environments, editado por Nancy Lee Peluso y Michael Watts, 189-212. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.


Academic Year: 2022/23

3391 - Bachelor's degree in Political and Administration Sciences

25049 - Environment, Development and Justice


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
339 - Faculty of Political and Social Sciences
Study:
3391 - Bachelor's degree in Political and Administration Sciences
Subject:
25049 - Environment, Development and Justice
Ambit:
---
Credits:
4.0
Course:
4 and 3
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Harold Mera Leon
Teaching Period:
Second quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

This course will critically inquire in the construction of ‘development’ as a concept geographically applied and intrinsically link to the capitalism’s expansion.  It considers the concept as an intentional economic and political project derived from colonialism and mercantilism. It also questions its outcomes in terms of reproduction of social inequalities and environmental consequences at global, national, and local scales.

Is expected that students develop a critical understanding of environmental conditions as an outcome inextricably connected to political, economic, and social processes based on modified structures of society under the rule of market. Additionally, the course aims to provide conceptual and technical tools as well as empirical knowledge to understand the origins and (re)production of uneven geographical development in the contemporary world.

The first part of the course will review critical theories of development, wherein students will become familiar with a range of concepts for understanding and unpacking the processes, mechanisms and discourses of ‘development’ and their relationships with global inequality and environmental instability. In the second part of the course, students will learn how development is fundamentally a “globalization project”, in order to reorganize global labour chains and mobilizes natural resources, while shaping unequal and unsustainable human-environment and socioeconomic relationships. The third part will review the systematic alternatives and critics of the sustainable project.

The course’s key concepts will be illustrated through a range of selected case studies from diverse geographical settings. By critically engaging with these case studies, students will become aware of the manner trough which uneven geographical development worked out and affected local ecosystems and socioeconomic structures, and how groups all over world organize and mobilize to resist and revert these processes. For that purpose, the curse will implement am ABP (Approach Based in Projects) which aims to align the subject’s contents to 17 the Sustainable Development Goals through a more practical and real analysis of problematic scenarios embedded in the 17 SDG’s or the Global Agenda for 2030.

Associated skills

This course is part of the optional courses itinerary “citizenship and government” that together, develops the following competencies:

 

BASIC SKILLS:

CB2. That students can apply their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional manner and have competences typically demonstrated through devising and sustaining arguments and solving problems within their field of study.

CB3. That students have the ability to gather and interpret relevant data (usually within their field of study) to inform judgments that include reflection on relevant social, scientific or ethical.

CB4. That students can communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

CB5. That students have developed those skills needed to undertake further studies with a high degree of autonomy.

 

GENERAL SKILLS:

CG1. Capacity for analysis and synthesis.

CG3. Knowledge of a second language.

CG4. Basic computer skills.

CG6. Interpersonal skills.

CG7. Ability to work in an interdisciplinary team.

CG10. Research skills.

CG12. Ability to generate new ideas (creativity).

CG13. Leadership.

CG15. Project design and management.

 

TRANSVERSAL SKILLS:

CT1. Identify and analyze critically gender inequality and its intersection with other axes of inequality.

 

SPECIFIC SKILLS:

CE2. Analyze the structure and functioning of political systems.

CE6. Identify citizen behavior and democratic values.

CE7. Analyze the functioning of electoral processes.

CE17. Apply the methods and techniques of political and social research.

CE18. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data.

CE19. Examine the techniques of political communication.

CE20. Categorize information and communication technologies (ICT) and analyze their impact on the political system.

Learning outcomes

ADDITIONAL SKILLS ABP-SDG’s:

1. Systematic thinking. Noticing and understanding the systematic interconnections and dependency within complex systems where we must face uncertainty.

2. Normative comprehension. To understand and think deeply concerning the norms and values underlying the human institutions but furthermore, to recognize the bargains game of values, principles and targets regarding sustainability and social justice, embedded in complex scenarios where interests and contradictions are always present. 

3. Prevention perspective. To understand and assess multiple futures – possible, probable and desirable-. Hence, to learn how use imagination for the creation of potential futures with caution concerning the consequences so plan how to deal with potential risks.

4. Strategic thinking. To jointly create and apply collective actions and innovation previously tested aiming to increase sustainability and social justices at different levels (Global – Local).

5. Cooperation attitude. To learn from others and respect other’s needs, perspectives, and actions through the comprehension of diversity so contradictions and conflicts could be resolve in a emphatic and peaceful manner within each group.

6. Critical thinking. To question norms, dogma, paradigms and practices based on those values need to transform the unsustainable and unfair reality of the world. Take a position concerning the harmless effects of no action.

7. Awareness: To be sure that a problematic situation exists in worldwide society reflected in the high levels of inequality and the unsustainable path of economic growth above other human values.

Sustainable Development Goals

Considering the relevance of sustainable development for the construction and comprehension of the development concept the subject touches different aspects of the SDG’s without addressing directly to them but within the current concerns of international and national governance structures. Hence, the subject content might refer to most of them without deep or specific study of any of them.
 
ODS 1: Fi de la pobresa / No poverty
ODS 2: Fam zero / Zero hunger
ODS 3: Salut i Benestar / Good health and well-being
ODS 4: Educació de qualitat / Quality education
ODS 5: Igualtat de gènere / Gender equality
ODS 6: Aigua neta i sanejament / Clean water and sanitation
ODS 7: Energia assequible i no contaminant / Affordable and clean energy
ODS 8: Treball decent i creixement economic / Decent work and economic growth
ODS 9: Indústria, innovació i infraestructura / Industry, innovation and infrastructure
ODS 10: Reducció de les desigualtats / Reduced inequalities
ODS 11: Ciutats i comunitats sostenibles / Sustainable cities and communities
ODS 12: Consum i producció responsables / Responsible consumption and production
ODS 13: Acció climàtica / Climate action
ODS 14: Vida submarina / Life below water
ODS 15: Vida Terrestre / Life on land
ODS 16: Pau, Justícia i institucions sòlides / Peace, justice and strong institutions
ODS 17: Aliança pels objectius / Partnerships for the goals

Contents

Session 1: Course introduction: The link between development environment and social injustice

  • Course Overview
  • Approaching to “development” concept Phill Mc Michael
  • Approaching to “social justice” concept Amartya Sen
  • Approaching to “political ecology” concept Paul Robbins
  • The development project as an economic and environmental construction project of economic and political elites
  • A notion of governance
  • Theory and Reality – Complexity Interdependence
  • Social Change

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Introduction and Chapter 1

Additional readings: Perreault (2009); Robbins (2012), Chapter 1.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

PART I – CRITICAL THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

 

Session 2: Colonialism, and the roots of the development project

  • Colonialism, the division of labor
  • Social Reorganization
  • Decolonization
  • Decolonization and Development
  • Ingredients of the Development Project
  • Framing the Development Project
  • Economic Nationalism

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017) Chapter 2

Additional readings: Davis (2001) Chapter 9, Davis (2004), Escobar (2012) Chapter 2, Ferguson and Lohman (1994)

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

Session 3: International Framework

  • The International Framework
  • Remarking the International Division of Labor
  • The Food Aid Regime
  • Remarking Third World Agriculture

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017) Chapter 3.

Additional readings: Carney (2004); Shiva (1991) Chapter 1.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. First Case Study.

 

Session 4: Globalizing Developments

  • The World Industrialization in Context
  • Agriculture Globalization
  • Global Finance

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 4.

 

Additional readings: Peet and Hartwick (2015), pp. 90–10

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

PART II - THE GLOBALIZATION PROJECT

 

Session 5: The Globalization Project (1980’s to 2000’s)

  • Instituting the Globalization Project
  • The Debt Regime
  • The Globalization Project
  • Global Governance
  • The World Trade Organization

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 5.

 

Additional readings: Conde and Kallis (2012).

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 6: The Globalization Project in Practice

  • Poverty Governance
  • Outsourcing
  • Global Labor-Sourcing Politics
  • Displacement
  • Informalization
  • Global Recolonization

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 6.

 

Additional readings: Karriem (2009); Peet and Hartwick (2015), pp- 310-324

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 7: Global Counter movements

  • Environmentalism
  • Feminism
  • Food Soveringty

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 7.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

PART III - Millennial Reckonings (2000’s to Present)

 

Session 8: The Globalization Project in Crises

  •  Social Crises Feminism
  • Legitimacy Crises
  • Geopolitical Transitions
  • Ecological Crises

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 9.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 9: Sustainable Development

  • The Challenge of Climate Change
  • Responses to the Sustainability Challenge
  • Public Interventions
  • Grassroots Developments

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 9.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Book

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

 

 

Session 10: Rethinking Development  

  • Development in the Gear of Social Change
  • Parading Change

 

Core readings: McMichael (2017), Chapter 10.

 

Additional readings: Patel and Moore (2017) Conclusion.

 

Second part: ABP. Approach Based in Problems. Group Case Study.

Teaching Methods

This course combines lectures, group work and individual participation. There will be 10 lecture classes, and 9 cases studies (ABP), plus one final evaluation session.

The sessions will combine a ‘traditional’ lecture format with the Approach Based in Problems.

The professor will explain important points related to the topic, with classroom activities (e.g., based on watching short videos or reading a short text in the class and answering questions related to it). 

Approach Based in Problem (ABP). In the second part of the class the group work will take place through cases studies the creation of solutions to specific problematic. Those problems entitles the 17 SDG’s including gender and marginalization situations.

Student participation is highly encouraged and will be sought through questions and discussions with the students.

 

Gender perspective

 The subject identifies and explains social marginalization mechanisms links to the colonial era, those through which women's well-being has been affected unfairly. Likewise, the evolution in a further accumulation of wealth and exploitation of human resources diminish women's labor conditions and deep the gap (wage and fields) in the labour market. Hence, the subject addresses the issue of defeminization of labor markets in specific sectors of the national and international economy and the logic of global farms, global factories, export production zones, and overall logic of reducing production costs cost of women health and well-being. Additionally, the subject highlights the importance of feminism as a grassroots, resistance movement through which equity, sustainability, food sovereignty well-being are likely to increase.

 

Sessions

In-class activities

Out-of-class activities

In class hours

Out-of-class hours

Session 1

Lecture

 

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 2

Lecture – Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 3

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Studyn

3

6

Session 4

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 5

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 6

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 7

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 8

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 9

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Session 10

Lecture - Case Study

Read assigned texts, Upload the Case Study

3

6

Hours

30

60

Study hours for evaluations

 

10

Total hours

100

Evaluation

This course includes two evaluation activities. Group Cases Studies and Final Evaluation.

 

ABP - Case studies

 Cases studies will be read and resolve by each group (4 members) during certain sessions. The case studies will be related to the topic studied within each session. The work should be uploaded in the aula global considering the deadline, same day of the lecture class. The answer to the case study must be in 500 words max.

- Stick to the word limit; state the word count in the document (especially if saving the file in PDF)

- Write in your own words, paraphrase the authors' arguments rather than citing them directly

- Write in plain English, but use rigorous and precise language 

- Show me that you've read texts carefully, research and discuss within the group

- Stick to the texts; resist the temptation to bring in more material or personal reflections (you're welcome to do that in the class!)

 

Final Exam

Final exam of 20 questions regarding the lecture class studied content.

 

Assessment`s Weights

 

Students will be evaluated two types of evaluation tools:

  • ABP - Case studies and performance in the classroom; this is directly connected with having done the readings that will be provided for each class and working in resolving the Problematic within each cases study
  • Performance on a Final Exam

 

In order to get a mark for this course, students must participate in the four evaluation sessions and write two essays (see below). The following table outlines the contribution of each evaluation to student final mark.

 

Evaluation tool

% of final mark

ABP - Case Studies - Group Work

40%

Final Exam

60%

 

 

Retest

Those failing the course will be given a second chance to pass the course by taking a resit exam (retest). Only those who have attended evaluation sessions and have handed in at least the 7 cases studies will be able to retest to pass the course.

Bibliography and information resources

Guarnieri, Eleonora and Rainer H. (2021) Colonialism and female empowerment: A two – sided legacy. In: Journal of Development Economics. Vol 151. June 2021. Colonialism and female empowerment: A two-sided legacy - ScienceDirect

Andreucci, Diego, y Giorgos Kallis. «Governmentality, Development and the Violence of Natural Resource Extraction in Peru». Ecological Economics 134 (april de 2017): 95-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.01.003.

Bernstein, Steven. The Compromise of Liberal Environmentalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.

Camargo, Alejandro, y Diana Ojeda. «Ambivalent desires: State formation and dispossession in the face of climate crisis». Political Geography 60 (1 de septiembre de 2017): 57-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polgeo.2017.04.003.

Escobar, Arturo. Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2008.

Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development. The Making and Unmaking of the Third World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Ferguson, James, y Lohman, Larry. «The Anti-Politics Machine. “Development” and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho». The Ecologist 24, n.o 5 (octubre de 1994).

Galeano, Eduardo. Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent. 25th anniversary ed. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1997.

Goldman, Michael. «Constructing an Environmental State: Eco-Governmentality and Other Transnational Practices of a ‘Green’ World Bank». Social Problems 48, n.o 4 (2001): 499-523. https://doi.org/10.1525/sp.2001.48.4.499.

———. Imperial Nature: The World Bank and Struggles for Social Justice in the Age of Globalization. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2005.

Harvey, David. The New Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Klein, Naomi. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate. London: Penguin, 2014.

McMichael, P. Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective. Sociology for a New Century Series. London: SAGE Publications, 2012.

Patel, Raj, y Jason W. Moore. A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things. A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2017.

Peet, R., y E. Hartwick. Theories of Development, Third Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives. New York and London: Guilford Publications, 2015.

Peet, Richard. Unholy Trinity: The IMF, World Bank and WTO. Second. London: Zed Books, 2009.

Peluso, Nancy Lee, y Michael Watts, eds. Violent Environments. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.

Perreault, Tom. «Environment and Development». En A Companion to Environmental Geography, editado por Noel Castree, David Demeritt, Diana Liverman, y Bruce Rhoads, 432-60. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

Prudham, Scott. «Pimping Climate Change: Richard Branson, Global Warming, and the Performance of Green Capitalism. Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space 41, n.o 7 (1 de julio de 2009): 1594-1613. https://doi.org/10.1068/a4071.

Robbins, Paul. Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction. Second Edition. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.

Sachs, Wolfgang, ed. The Development Dictionary. A Guide to Knowledge as Power. London and New Jersey: Zed Books, 1992.

Taylor, Marcus. The Political Ecology of Climate Change Adaptation. Livelihoods, agrarian change and the conflicts of development. London and New York: Routledge, 2015.

Watts, Michael. «Petro-Violence: Community, Extraction, and Political Ecology of a Mythic Commodity». En Violent Environments, editado por Nancy Lee Peluso y Michael Watts, 189-212. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.