Consulta de Guies Docents



Academic Year/course: 2022/23

21883 - Public Policy Analysis


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
304 - Faculty of Law and Economics
332 - Faculty of Economic and Business Sciences
Study:
3041 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics
3324 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Business Management and Administration
Subject:
21883 - Public Policy Analysis
Credits:
5.0
Course:
418 - Bachelor's degree in Economics: 4
418 - Bachelor's degree in Economics: 3
417 - Bachelor's degree in Business Management and Administration: 3
417 - Bachelor's degree in Business Management and Administration: 4
523 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics: 6
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Teachers:
Rodrigo Carril Mac Donald
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Professor: Rodrigo Carril (rodrigo.carril@upf.edu)
Lectures: Mondays and Tuesdays 16:30-18:00, room 40.063
Office hours: By appointment (e-mail)

Seminars: Certain Thursdays, 15:00-16:30 (Group 101) and 16:30-18:00 (Group 102), both in room 40.150

 

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the tools of Public Economics, and to apply these to the analysis of specific public policies. We will start with an overview of both theoretical and empirical tools. We will then use these to study a range of specific topics, including policies to address environmental externalities, the design of major social insurance programs (such as unemployment insurance, public health insurance, retirement systems), and (time permitting) policies to alleviate poverty and inequality. By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the main questions behind the contemporary empirical public economics topics reviewed in the course, and the empirical methods used in public policy evaluation.

Associated skills

1. Analytical and synthesis skills.

2. Ability to identify and solve economic problems and the potential trade-offs arising in their resolution.

3. Ability to understand and use economic models, and to understand the public economics concepts of the course.

4. Ability to participate actively in class (know how to intervene, to listen and acquire oral and written communication skills), keeping an open mind; communication skills (including a group presentation).

5. Ability to work individually (reading material for the course, reading research papers, preparing individual reports and answering related questions, etc.), and in a small group (preparing student presentations).

6. Ability to relate the analysis of socio-economic problems with the objectives and the main instruments of economic policy.

7. Research skills (search and review academic literature in order to expand your knowledge in the field), ability to independently find information (databases, media, etc.) in order to build an argument using available evidence.

Learning outcomes

The course is based on the principle of continuous assessment, with an important weight put on the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the term, with a mix of lectures focusing on theory and empirical methods, small group seminars, and independent work. The course requires active student's involvement and regular participation.

Sustainable Development Goals

The contents of this class (see below) relate closely several of United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In particular, lectures and seminar activities will touch directly or indirectly on SDGs #1 (no poverty), #3 (good health and well-being), #5 (gender equality), #7 (affordable and clean energy), #8 (decent work and economic growth)#10 (reduced inequalities), and #13 (climate action). 

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of microeconomic theory and econometrics is required to be able to understand and interpret the results of the empirical papers.

Contents

Lectures:

1. Introduction: What is Public Economics and Rationales for Government Intervention

2. Empirical Tools in Public Economics

3. Environmental Externalities

4. Social Insurance: Introduction and optimal design

5. Unemployment Insurance

6. Public Health Insurance

7. Retirement and Public Pension Systems

8. Poverty and Inequality (only if we have time)

Teaching Methods

The methodology of the course is based on student autonomy and learning. Students must provide a systematic and continuous effort, guided by the learning supervisor. Thus, the course combines activities performed in classes (both lectures and seminars) with activities that students must carry out on their own, either guided or independently. 

 

Specifically, students are expected to:

1. Read and critically think about the readings and material made available during lectures and seminars.

2. Complement the content presented in lectures and seminars by using the recommended bibliography and online resources.

3. Identify and summarize the most important points of each reading.

4. Ask questions and go to office hours with the instructor if they are having difficulties understanding the topics.

5. Attend all lectures and seminars.

6. Participate actively during lectures and seminars.

7. Hand-in all the homework assigned.

8. Work in groups to prepare the student presentations.

 

On their side, instructors are expected to:

1. Present and explain the main points of each topic in class.

2. Answer questions to the students.

3. Supervise the student presentation preparation.

4. Illustrate the application of theoretical material through exercises and case studies.

5. Assist students, providing the necessary supervision for students to adequately perform the activities mentioned above.

 

Evaluation

NOTA: L'assignació docent d'aquesta assignatura està pendent, per tant tot i que la descripció de l'assignatura no variarà, altres aspectes d'aquest PDA poden canviar un cop acabada l'assignació docent. 
NOTE: The teaching assignment for this course is pending, therefore, even if the course description will not change, other aspects of this syllabus may be different once the teaching assignment has been finalized.
 

The course is based on the principle of continuous assessment, with an important weight put on the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the term, with a mix of lectures focusing on theory and empirical methods, small group seminars, and independent work. The course requires active student involvement and regular participation.

 

Assessment rules

 

a) The evaluation of the course will be based on class participation during lectures and especially seminars (15%), homework assignments (35%), group presentations (20%) and the final exam (30%). More detail on each of these components will be given in class.

b) To pass the course, one must obtain a final grade equal or greater than 5 on a 0-10 scale. The final grade is a weighted average of the four components of the grade (assignments, participation, group presentations, and final exam). A minimum grade of 4 in the final exam is required to pass the course. Students who attended the course but failed can take the re-sit exam (recuperación). See rules below for the re-sit.

c) Homework assignments will be posted on AulaGlobal one week in advance and will have to be handed in the following week (Fridays at noon).

d) Attendance to seminars and participation is required to get a good participation grade. Seminar attendance without participation does not ensure any minimum grade. Students are expected to attend all lectures and seminars; however, they may miss up to 3 lectures and 1 seminar without getting any penalty in their participation grade. Students will receive a one-point reduction in the participation grade for each missed lecture beyond the third missed lecture. Students will receive a one-point reduction in the participation grade for each missed seminar beyond the first missed seminar. For example, if a student misses 5 lectures and 2 seminars, the maximum participation grade that he/she can aspire is a 7.

e) Readings may be assigned ahead of lectures and seminars. It is expected as part of the participation grade that students will read the assigned material and come to lectures and seminars prepared to discuss them.

f) According to university regulations for courses taught in English, students will take all the assessments (instructions, questions and answers) exclusively in English.

ALL students enrolled in the course are subject to the criteria described in this PDA, as well as to the dates of delivery of assignments and examinations (which will be known during the term). This includes those who come from exchange agreements.

 

Rules for the re-sit exam

 

The re-sit exam will take place on the date scheduled in the academic calendar (the date will be published in AulaGlobal). A student can take the re-sit exam if and only if she/he has participated in the class during the term, but has failed to pass the course. In particular, to be able to take the re-sit exam, a student must fulfill all the following requisites:

- He/she attended at least 3 seminars and at least 8 lectures (except for duly justified reasons);

- he/she handed-in at least 2 assignments that obtained a grade of at least 4;

- he/she participated in the group presentation;

- he/she took the final exam; 

and,

- he/she obtained a final grade of less than 5, or a final-exam grade of less than 4.

 

The re-sit exam is only for students who attended and participated in the activities of the course (as defined in the above requisites) but failed. Students who attended the course and passed with a final grade equal or greater than 5.0 cannot take the re-sit exam.

 

 

Seminars

 

Seminars will take place online on certain scheduled Fridays. Assignment to seminar groups will be done by the University. Seminar assignments will be posted on AulaGlobal one week in advance and will have to be handed in the following week before the seminars start.

 

Student presentations 

 

Small groups of students must prepare a short presentation on a specific public policy. Detailed information regarding this activity will be posted in Aula Global on a separate document.

 

Bibliography and information resources

- Gruber, J (2016) Public Finance and Public Policy, fifth edition, Worth Publishers

- Atkinson, A and Stiglitz, J (2015), Lectures on Public Economics, Princeton University Press

- Auerbach, A, Chetty, R, Feldstein M and Saez, E (2013) Handbook of Public Economics, vol. 5, Elsevier

- Stiglitz, J and Rosengard, J (2015) Economics of the Public Sector, fourth edition, W.W. Norton and Company

- Stock, J and Watson, M (2015) Introduction to Econometrics, third edition, Pearson

- Angrist, J and Pischke, J-S (2014) Mastering ‘Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect, Princeton University Press

 

Further online resources will be provided throughout the course.

 


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

21883 - Public Policy Analysis


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
304 - Faculty of Law and Economics
332 - Faculty of Economic and Business Sciences
Study:
3041 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics
3324 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Business Management and Administration
Subject:
21883 - Public Policy Analysis
Credits:
5.0
Course:
418 - Bachelor's degree in Economics: 4
418 - Bachelor's degree in Economics: 3
417 - Bachelor's degree in Business Management and Administration: 3
417 - Bachelor's degree in Business Management and Administration: 4
523 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics: 6
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Teachers:
Rodrigo Carril Mac Donald
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Professor: Rodrigo Carril (rodrigo.carril@upf.edu)
Lectures: Mondays and Tuesdays 16:30-18:00, room 40.063
Office hours: By appointment (e-mail)

Seminars: Certain Thursdays, 15:00-16:30 (Group 101) and 16:30-18:00 (Group 102), both in room 40.150

 

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the tools of Public Economics, and to apply these to the analysis of specific public policies. We will start with an overview of both theoretical and empirical tools. We will then use these to study a range of specific topics, including policies to address environmental externalities, the design of major social insurance programs (such as unemployment insurance, public health insurance, retirement systems), and (time permitting) policies to alleviate poverty and inequality. By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the main questions behind the contemporary empirical public economics topics reviewed in the course, and the empirical methods used in public policy evaluation.

Associated skills

1. Analytical and synthesis skills.

2. Ability to identify and solve economic problems and the potential trade-offs arising in their resolution.

3. Ability to understand and use economic models, and to understand the public economics concepts of the course.

4. Ability to participate actively in class (know how to intervene, to listen and acquire oral and written communication skills), keeping an open mind; communication skills (including a group presentation).

5. Ability to work individually (reading material for the course, reading research papers, preparing individual reports and answering related questions, etc.), and in a small group (preparing student presentations).

6. Ability to relate the analysis of socio-economic problems with the objectives and the main instruments of economic policy.

7. Research skills (search and review academic literature in order to expand your knowledge in the field), ability to independently find information (databases, media, etc.) in order to build an argument using available evidence.

Learning outcomes

The course is based on the principle of continuous assessment, with an important weight put on the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the term, with a mix of lectures focusing on theory and empirical methods, small group seminars, and independent work. The course requires active student's involvement and regular participation.

Sustainable Development Goals

The contents of this class (see below) relate closely several of United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In particular, lectures and seminar activities will touch directly or indirectly on SDGs #1 (no poverty), #3 (good health and well-being), #5 (gender equality), #7 (affordable and clean energy), #8 (decent work and economic growth)#10 (reduced inequalities), and #13 (climate action). 

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of microeconomic theory and econometrics is required to be able to understand and interpret the results of the empirical papers.

Contents

Lectures:

1. Introduction: What is Public Economics and Rationales for Government Intervention

2. Empirical Tools in Public Economics

3. Environmental Externalities

4. Social Insurance: Introduction and optimal design

5. Unemployment Insurance

6. Public Health Insurance

7. Retirement and Public Pension Systems

8. Poverty and Inequality (only if we have time)

Teaching Methods

The methodology of the course is based on student autonomy and learning. Students must provide a systematic and continuous effort, guided by the learning supervisor. Thus, the course combines activities performed in classes (both lectures and seminars) with activities that students must carry out on their own, either guided or independently. 

 

Specifically, students are expected to:

1. Read and critically think about the readings and material made available during lectures and seminars.

2. Complement the content presented in lectures and seminars by using the recommended bibliography and online resources.

3. Identify and summarize the most important points of each reading.

4. Ask questions and go to office hours with the instructor if they are having difficulties understanding the topics.

5. Attend all lectures and seminars.

6. Participate actively during lectures and seminars.

7. Hand-in all the homework assigned.

8. Work in groups to prepare the student presentations.

 

On their side, instructors are expected to:

1. Present and explain the main points of each topic in class.

2. Answer questions to the students.

3. Supervise the student presentation preparation.

4. Illustrate the application of theoretical material through exercises and case studies.

5. Assist students, providing the necessary supervision for students to adequately perform the activities mentioned above.

 

Evaluation

NOTA: L'assignació docent d'aquesta assignatura està pendent, per tant tot i que la descripció de l'assignatura no variarà, altres aspectes d'aquest PDA poden canviar un cop acabada l'assignació docent. 
NOTE: The teaching assignment for this course is pending, therefore, even if the course description will not change, other aspects of this syllabus may be different once the teaching assignment has been finalized.
 

The course is based on the principle of continuous assessment, with an important weight put on the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the term, with a mix of lectures focusing on theory and empirical methods, small group seminars, and independent work. The course requires active student involvement and regular participation.

 

Assessment rules

 

a) The evaluation of the course will be based on class participation during lectures and especially seminars (15%), homework assignments (35%), group presentations (20%) and the final exam (30%). More detail on each of these components will be given in class.

b) To pass the course, one must obtain a final grade equal or greater than 5 on a 0-10 scale. The final grade is a weighted average of the four components of the grade (assignments, participation, group presentations, and final exam). A minimum grade of 4 in the final exam is required to pass the course. Students who attended the course but failed can take the re-sit exam (recuperación). See rules below for the re-sit.

c) Homework assignments will be posted on AulaGlobal one week in advance and will have to be handed in the following week (Fridays at noon).

d) Attendance to seminars and participation is required to get a good participation grade. Seminar attendance without participation does not ensure any minimum grade. Students are expected to attend all lectures and seminars; however, they may miss up to 3 lectures and 1 seminar without getting any penalty in their participation grade. Students will receive a one-point reduction in the participation grade for each missed lecture beyond the third missed lecture. Students will receive a one-point reduction in the participation grade for each missed seminar beyond the first missed seminar. For example, if a student misses 5 lectures and 2 seminars, the maximum participation grade that he/she can aspire is a 7.

e) Readings may be assigned ahead of lectures and seminars. It is expected as part of the participation grade that students will read the assigned material and come to lectures and seminars prepared to discuss them.

f) According to university regulations for courses taught in English, students will take all the assessments (instructions, questions and answers) exclusively in English.

ALL students enrolled in the course are subject to the criteria described in this PDA, as well as to the dates of delivery of assignments and examinations (which will be known during the term). This includes those who come from exchange agreements.

 

Rules for the re-sit exam

 

The re-sit exam will take place on the date scheduled in the academic calendar (the date will be published in AulaGlobal). A student can take the re-sit exam if and only if she/he has participated in the class during the term, but has failed to pass the course. In particular, to be able to take the re-sit exam, a student must fulfill all the following requisites:

- He/she attended at least 3 seminars and at least 8 lectures (except for duly justified reasons);

- he/she handed-in at least 2 assignments that obtained a grade of at least 4;

- he/she participated in the group presentation;

- he/she took the final exam; 

and,

- he/she obtained a final grade of less than 5, or a final-exam grade of less than 4.

 

The re-sit exam is only for students who attended and participated in the activities of the course (as defined in the above requisites) but failed. Students who attended the course and passed with a final grade equal or greater than 5.0 cannot take the re-sit exam.

 

 

Seminars

 

Seminars will take place online on certain scheduled Fridays. Assignment to seminar groups will be done by the University. Seminar assignments will be posted on AulaGlobal one week in advance and will have to be handed in the following week before the seminars start.

 

Student presentations 

 

Small groups of students must prepare a short presentation on a specific public policy. Detailed information regarding this activity will be posted in Aula Global on a separate document.

 

Bibliography and information resources

- Gruber, J (2016) Public Finance and Public Policy, fifth edition, Worth Publishers

- Atkinson, A and Stiglitz, J (2015), Lectures on Public Economics, Princeton University Press

- Auerbach, A, Chetty, R, Feldstein M and Saez, E (2013) Handbook of Public Economics, vol. 5, Elsevier

- Stiglitz, J and Rosengard, J (2015) Economics of the Public Sector, fourth edition, W.W. Norton and Company

- Stock, J and Watson, M (2015) Introduction to Econometrics, third edition, Pearson

- Angrist, J and Pischke, J-S (2014) Mastering ‘Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect, Princeton University Press

 

Further online resources will be provided throughout the course.

 


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

21883 - Public Policy Analysis


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
304 - Faculty of Law and Economics
332 - Faculty of Economic and Business Sciences
Study:
3041 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics
3324 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Business Management and Administration
Subject:
21883 - Public Policy Analysis
Credits:
5.0
Course:
418 - Bachelor's degree in Economics: 4
418 - Bachelor's degree in Economics: 3
417 - Bachelor's degree in Business Management and Administration: 3
417 - Bachelor's degree in Business Management and Administration: 4
523 - Double bachelor's degree programme in Law and Business Management and Administration / Economics: 6
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Teachers:
Rodrigo Carril Mac Donald
Teaching Period:
Third Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Professor: Rodrigo Carril (rodrigo.carril@upf.edu)
Lectures: Mondays and Tuesdays 16:30-18:00, room 40.063
Office hours: By appointment (e-mail)

Seminars: Certain Thursdays, 15:00-16:30 (Group 101) and 16:30-18:00 (Group 102), both in room 40.150

 

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the tools of Public Economics, and to apply these to the analysis of specific public policies. We will start with an overview of both theoretical and empirical tools. We will then use these to study a range of specific topics, including policies to address environmental externalities, the design of major social insurance programs (such as unemployment insurance, public health insurance, retirement systems), and (time permitting) policies to alleviate poverty and inequality. By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the main questions behind the contemporary empirical public economics topics reviewed in the course, and the empirical methods used in public policy evaluation.

Associated skills

1. Analytical and synthesis skills.

2. Ability to identify and solve economic problems and the potential trade-offs arising in their resolution.

3. Ability to understand and use economic models, and to understand the public economics concepts of the course.

4. Ability to participate actively in class (know how to intervene, to listen and acquire oral and written communication skills), keeping an open mind; communication skills (including a group presentation).

5. Ability to work individually (reading material for the course, reading research papers, preparing individual reports and answering related questions, etc.), and in a small group (preparing student presentations).

6. Ability to relate the analysis of socio-economic problems with the objectives and the main instruments of economic policy.

7. Research skills (search and review academic literature in order to expand your knowledge in the field), ability to independently find information (databases, media, etc.) in order to build an argument using available evidence.

Learning outcomes

The course is based on the principle of continuous assessment, with an important weight put on the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the term, with a mix of lectures focusing on theory and empirical methods, small group seminars, and independent work. The course requires active student's involvement and regular participation.

Sustainable Development Goals

The contents of this class (see below) relate closely several of United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In particular, lectures and seminar activities will touch directly or indirectly on SDGs #1 (no poverty), #3 (good health and well-being), #5 (gender equality), #7 (affordable and clean energy), #8 (decent work and economic growth)#10 (reduced inequalities), and #13 (climate action). 

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of microeconomic theory and econometrics is required to be able to understand and interpret the results of the empirical papers.

Contents

Lectures:

1. Introduction: What is Public Economics and Rationales for Government Intervention

2. Empirical Tools in Public Economics

3. Environmental Externalities

4. Social Insurance: Introduction and optimal design

5. Unemployment Insurance

6. Public Health Insurance

7. Retirement and Public Pension Systems

8. Poverty and Inequality (only if we have time)

Teaching Methods

The methodology of the course is based on student autonomy and learning. Students must provide a systematic and continuous effort, guided by the learning supervisor. Thus, the course combines activities performed in classes (both lectures and seminars) with activities that students must carry out on their own, either guided or independently. 

 

Specifically, students are expected to:

1. Read and critically think about the readings and material made available during lectures and seminars.

2. Complement the content presented in lectures and seminars by using the recommended bibliography and online resources.

3. Identify and summarize the most important points of each reading.

4. Ask questions and go to office hours with the instructor if they are having difficulties understanding the topics.

5. Attend all lectures and seminars.

6. Participate actively during lectures and seminars.

7. Hand-in all the homework assigned.

8. Work in groups to prepare the student presentations.

 

On their side, instructors are expected to:

1. Present and explain the main points of each topic in class.

2. Answer questions to the students.

3. Supervise the student presentation preparation.

4. Illustrate the application of theoretical material through exercises and case studies.

5. Assist students, providing the necessary supervision for students to adequately perform the activities mentioned above.

 

Evaluation

NOTA: L'assignació docent d'aquesta assignatura està pendent, per tant tot i que la descripció de l'assignatura no variarà, altres aspectes d'aquest PDA poden canviar un cop acabada l'assignació docent. 
NOTE: The teaching assignment for this course is pending, therefore, even if the course description will not change, other aspects of this syllabus may be different once the teaching assignment has been finalized.
 

The course is based on the principle of continuous assessment, with an important weight put on the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the term, with a mix of lectures focusing on theory and empirical methods, small group seminars, and independent work. The course requires active student involvement and regular participation.

 

Assessment rules

 

a) The evaluation of the course will be based on class participation during lectures and especially seminars (15%), homework assignments (35%), group presentations (20%) and the final exam (30%). More detail on each of these components will be given in class.

b) To pass the course, one must obtain a final grade equal or greater than 5 on a 0-10 scale. The final grade is a weighted average of the four components of the grade (assignments, participation, group presentations, and final exam). A minimum grade of 4 in the final exam is required to pass the course. Students who attended the course but failed can take the re-sit exam (recuperación). See rules below for the re-sit.

c) Homework assignments will be posted on AulaGlobal one week in advance and will have to be handed in the following week (Fridays at noon).

d) Attendance to seminars and participation is required to get a good participation grade. Seminar attendance without participation does not ensure any minimum grade. Students are expected to attend all lectures and seminars; however, they may miss up to 3 lectures and 1 seminar without getting any penalty in their participation grade. Students will receive a one-point reduction in the participation grade for each missed lecture beyond the third missed lecture. Students will receive a one-point reduction in the participation grade for each missed seminar beyond the first missed seminar. For example, if a student misses 5 lectures and 2 seminars, the maximum participation grade that he/she can aspire is a 7.

e) Readings may be assigned ahead of lectures and seminars. It is expected as part of the participation grade that students will read the assigned material and come to lectures and seminars prepared to discuss them.

f) According to university regulations for courses taught in English, students will take all the assessments (instructions, questions and answers) exclusively in English.

ALL students enrolled in the course are subject to the criteria described in this PDA, as well as to the dates of delivery of assignments and examinations (which will be known during the term). This includes those who come from exchange agreements.

 

Rules for the re-sit exam

 

The re-sit exam will take place on the date scheduled in the academic calendar (the date will be published in AulaGlobal). A student can take the re-sit exam if and only if she/he has participated in the class during the term, but has failed to pass the course. In particular, to be able to take the re-sit exam, a student must fulfill all the following requisites:

- He/she attended at least 3 seminars and at least 8 lectures (except for duly justified reasons);

- he/she handed-in at least 2 assignments that obtained a grade of at least 4;

- he/she participated in the group presentation;

- he/she took the final exam; 

and,

- he/she obtained a final grade of less than 5, or a final-exam grade of less than 4.

 

The re-sit exam is only for students who attended and participated in the activities of the course (as defined in the above requisites) but failed. Students who attended the course and passed with a final grade equal or greater than 5.0 cannot take the re-sit exam.

 

 

Seminars

 

Seminars will take place online on certain scheduled Fridays. Assignment to seminar groups will be done by the University. Seminar assignments will be posted on AulaGlobal one week in advance and will have to be handed in the following week before the seminars start.

 

Student presentations 

 

Small groups of students must prepare a short presentation on a specific public policy. Detailed information regarding this activity will be posted in Aula Global on a separate document.

 

Bibliography and information resources

- Gruber, J (2016) Public Finance and Public Policy, fifth edition, Worth Publishers

- Atkinson, A and Stiglitz, J (2015), Lectures on Public Economics, Princeton University Press

- Auerbach, A, Chetty, R, Feldstein M and Saez, E (2013) Handbook of Public Economics, vol. 5, Elsevier

- Stiglitz, J and Rosengard, J (2015) Economics of the Public Sector, fourth edition, W.W. Norton and Company

- Stock, J and Watson, M (2015) Introduction to Econometrics, third edition, Pearson

- Angrist, J and Pischke, J-S (2014) Mastering ‘Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect, Princeton University Press

 

Further online resources will be provided throughout the course.