Consulta de Guies Docents



Academic Year/course: 2022/23

3381 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Audiovisual Communication

20485 - Audiovisual and Education


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
338 - Faculty of Communication
Study:
3381 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Audiovisual Communication
Subject:
20485 - Audiovisual and Education
Credits:
4.0
Course:
699 - Minor in Communication: 1
395 - Bachelor's degree in Audiovisual Communication: 3
395 - Bachelor's degree in Audiovisual Communication: 4
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Maria Castellvi Lloveras, María del Mar Guerrero Pico
Teaching Period:
First Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Media literacy involves the relationship of two fields of study: education and communication. It has received different names in recent decades such as pedagogy of communication, educommunication, education for television, digital education, and more recently, media and information literacy (MIL). 

In this course we will introduce the students to this field of study through theoretical sessions, workshops and presentations. The aim of the course is to develop basic notions about media literacy, to understand its evolution and to develop the ability to design and produce materials to be applied in different contexts. It is important to highlight that, in recent years, the deep transformations in media ecology have propelled a total rethinking of traditional models of media literacy.

Throughout this subject, students will question and reassess the most traditional formulas in order to understand the concept of media literacy within the new media ecosystems. It is also key to understand the mental mechanisms through which mass media and social media influence is carried out.

Associated skills

General competences 

  • Ability for critical and comprehensive analysis of communicative phenomena.

  • Ability to expand the proposed bibliography.

  • Ability to apply the newly acquired knowledge and skills in order to solve problems in new and unfamiliar environments and in broad contexts related to the field of study.

  • Ability to question and make the most of innovations, both technological and epistemological.

  • Ability to combine rigour with imagination and creativity.

  • Ability to apply theoretical knowledge to daily practice.  

  • Ability to communicate with clarity and precision the results of the activities carried out in the classroom.

  • Ability to work in a group and collaborate. 

  • Ability for criticism and self-criticism.

  • Ability to learn to learn.

 

Specific competences

  • To understand the concept of media literacy, its evolution and practice in recent decades.

  • To reflect on their own media practices, the competences that are developed through them and to understand their learning strategies.

  • To be able to propose and carry out a media literacy project adapted to the new media ecology in a real social context.

  • To acquire the ability to analyze audiovisual messages of an educational and cultural nature in terms of effectiveness.

  • To be able to find intersections between academic and cultural demands and the sensitivity and interests of the interlocutors.

  • To foster real-life applications of technological innovations and new communication practices in media literacy.

  • To rethink the educational and cultural audiovisual and multimedia sectors from the management of the audience’s emotional skills.

Sustainable Development Goals

The following Sustainable Development Goals will be reviewed throughout the course:

SDG 5: Gender equality

SDG 10: Reduce inequalities

SDG 16: Peace, justice, and strong institutions

Prerequisites

None

Contents

Unit 1. What is media literacy?

  • Most important theoretical concepts about media literacy

  • Education in media and through the media

  • Evolution of media literacy

  • Media education competences

Unit 2. Application of Media Literacy

  • Universal declarations

  • Legislating on Media Literacy: Spanish and European education laws

Unit 3. How to research Media Literacy

  • National and international Media Literacy research projects 

  • Main research methods used in media literacy projects

Unit 4. New trends in Media Literacy

  • The New Literacies and informal learning spaces I: Fandom

  • The New Literacies and informal learning spaces II: Video games and YouTube

  • Transmedia Literacy

  • Influencers: mapping learning on social media

The definitive syllabus and class schedule will be available at Aula Global.

Teaching Methods

Throughout the course, different active learning methods are combined: master classes, individual and group readings, class debates, student presentations, video screenings, dialogues with guest speakers, and especially, learning through research/action projects. All these methods will be carried out in-person every Friday at Room 52.423 from 9.00 am to 12.30 pm with a 15-minute coffee break in between.

Aula Global will be the hub of our course: all the resources, tasks and (only if necessary) online sessions will be notified through this platform. Please, monitor Aula Global regularly.

Every week, students will be required to read the texts corresponding to each session so that there will always be a common topic for discussion and participation in different learning activities (individual and group readings, lectures, debates, interactive quizzes and challenges, etc.).

Students will be required to develop a Group Project related to Media Literacy (see the Project Guide at Aula Global for specific guidelines). Practice and mentoring sessions for these projects will take place in small team gatherings in the classroom between 11.00 am and 12.30 pm after the coffee break.

IMPORTANT: Aula Global will be the only valid method to submit assignments. Submissions by email or any other method will not be accepted, as a general rule.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

 

Session/Day

Units

Mandatory readings

Tasks

1

30th

September

Welcome/Course presentation

Basic concepts related to media literacy

Mar Guerrero-Pico


––Bulger, M. & Davison, P. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute.


––Potter, W. J. (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. 

Warm-up discussion in the classroom


Group work in the classroom

2

7th October

Understanding media competences

María Castellví

––Ferrés, J. and Piscitelli, A. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. 


Group work in the classroom

3

14th October

Media Literacy in Practice 1: Visit to Barri Media Lab 

Guest speakers: J.M. Tomasena & Alicia Alcalde (Barri Media Lab)




None.


Barri Media Lab is a community audiovisual education and creation project established in the heart of Poblenou, Barcelona. They offer workshops and training courses that enhance the civic and creative possibilities of media so that participants can tell their own story through multiple languages: photography, video, sound and writing.

Field trip and on-site presentation at Barri Media Lab (time and address to be confirmed)

4

21st October

Contemporary issues related to Media Literacy:  problems and educational proposals

––Grandío, María del Mar, Dilli, Sirin, and O’Neill, Brian. (2017). Legal Frameworks for Media and Information Literacy. In D. Frau-Meigs, I. Velez, & J. Flores Michel (Eds.), Public Policies in Media and Information Literacy in Europe: Cross-Country Comparisons, pp. 116-129

Group work in the classroom 



DEADLINE 20th October: Project team formations. Communication via Aula Global.




5

28th October

Film forum: Born into Brothels




Research methods for Media Literacy Research / Action

Guest speaker: 

Mittzy Arciniega




––Rangan, P. (2011). Immaterial child labor: Media advocacy, autoethnography, and the case of Born into Brothels. Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, 25(3): 143-177


––Jagers, R, S., & Flanagan, C. (2021). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2), 201-216.




Film screening and forum:  Born into brothels (2004), a documentary by Zana Briski and Ross Kaufman (125 m.)


SUBMISSION 26th October: project abstract (topic and competences). Submission via Aula Global.



6

4th November

The New Literacies: fandom, videogames and other informal learning spaces

Mar Guerrero-Pico




––Jenkins, H (2019). Art Happens not in Isolation, but in Community: The Collective Literacies of Media Fandom. Culture Science Journal, 11(1), 78-88.


—Toh, Weimin, & Lim, Fei Victor. (2021). Using Video Games for Learning: Developing a Metalanguage for Digital Play. Games and Culture, 16(5), 583–610.



Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

7

11th November

Transmedia Literacy


Mar Guerrero-Pico

––Masanet, M-J., Guerrero-Pico, M., Establés, M-J. (2019. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413.

Bonus reading

––Scolari, C. Masanet, M-J., Guerrero-Pico, M., & Establés, M-J. (2018). Transmedia Literacy in the New Media Ecology. An International Map of Teens’ Transmedia Skills and Informal Learning Strategies. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 801-812. 

Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

8

18th November

Media Literacy in Practice II: The case of Nadir


Guest speakers:


Eloi Sánchez & Clàudia Barberà (Nadir)




None.


Nadir  is an educational project formed by four filmmakers specialised in audiovisual education with children and young people. They conduct workshops in collaboration with educational centers, leisure spaces or social entities based on the practical and experiential work of all participants.

Master class by Nadir


Project mentoring in the classroom

9

25th November

What’s to learn about influencers?


María Castellví

Reading to be confirmed.


Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

10

2nd December

Group project presentations

None.

Project presentations,  discussion, and course farewell. 


SUBMISSION 2nd December: peer-review report. Submission via Aula Global.



SUBMISSION 7th December: project report. Submission via Aula Global.

SUBMISSION 16th December: Personal essay on media literacy. Submission via Aula Global.

Evaluation

The evaluation of the course is composed of three elements, as detailed in the following table:


Items  to evaluate

Type

Weigh

Submission date

Project on media literacy 

Presentation

Group

10%

2/12/2022

Presentation peer-review

Group 

10%

2/12/2022

Report

Group

40%

7/12/2022


Personal essay on media literacy

Individual

30%

16/12/2021


Participation in weekly activities (individual reading, group work, etc.) in the classroom.

Individual

10%

Throughout the course

 

NOTE: The final mark will be the sum of the three items. Students must achieve a minimum 5/10 mark in all items in order to pass the course.

REMEDIAL TASKS: In case students do not earn the minimum mark in some of the items, they are expected to re-submit a new version of the pending ones during the second-chance assessment period of the term. To qualify for this second-chance period, students must have submitted all items during the regular assessment period of the term–that is, students featured as Not Submitted in some of the items by the 17th of December will be excluded from the process and thus qualified as Not Submitted in the final mark.

Bibliography and information resources

Basic

  • Buckingham, David. (2019). The Media Education Manifesto. Polity Press.
  • Bulger, Monica and Davison, Patrick. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute. Retrieved from https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Media_Literacy_2018.pdf
  • Ferrés, Joan & Piscitelli, Alejandro. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08
  • Frau-Meigs, Divina, Kotilainen, Sirkku, Pathak-Shelak, Manisha, Hoechsmann, Michael, Poyntz, Stuart R. (2020). The Handbook of Media Education Research. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Gee, James Paul & Hayes, Elisabeth. (2012). Nurturing afinity spaces and game-based learning. In C. Steinkuehler, K. Squire, & S. Barab (Eds.), Games, Learning, and Society: Learning and Meaning in the Digital Age (pp. 129–155). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139031127.015
  • Grandío, María del Mar, Dilli, Sirin, and O’Neill, Brian. (2017). Legal Frameworks for Media and Information Literacy. In D. Frau-Meigs, I. Velez, & J. Flores Michel (Eds.), Public Policies in Media and Information Literacy in Europe: Cross-Country Comparisons (pp. 116-129). London/New York: Routledge.
  • Hoechsmann, Michael, & Poyntz, Stuart R. (2012). Media Literacies: A Critical Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Jagers, Robert  & Flanagan,  Constance (2021). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2020.1865613
  • Jenkins, Henry (2019). Art Happens not in Isolation, but in Community: The Collective Literacies of Media Fandom. Culture Science Journal, 11(1), 78-88. https://doi.org/10.5334/csci.125
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Polity Books.
  • Lankshear, Colin, & Knobel, Michelle. (2013). A New Literacies Reader: Educational Perspectives. Peter Lang.
  • Livingstone, Sonia. and Sefton-Green, Julian. (2016). The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. NYU Press.
  • Masanet, Maria-Jose, Guerrero-Pico, Mar, and Establés, María-José. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2019.1641513
  • Mihailidis, Paul. (2019). Civic Media Literacies:  Reimagining Human Condition in an Age of Digital Abundance. Routledge. 
  • Potter, W. James (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462
  • Sádaba, Charo, & Salaverría, Ramón. (2022). Tackling disinformation with media literacy: analysis of trends in the European Union. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 81, 17-33. https://www.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2023-1552
  • Scolari, Carlos, Masanet, María José, Guerrero-Pico, Mar and Establés, María José (2018). Transmedia Literacy in the New Media Ecology. An International Map of Teens’ Transmedia Skills and Informal Learning Strategies. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 801-812. doi: https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.jul.09
  • Toh, Weimin, & Lim, Fei Victor. (2021). Using Video Games for Learning: Developing a Metalanguage for Digital Play. Games and Culture, 16(5), 583–610. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412020921339
  • UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking Education: Towards a global common good? Retrieved from https://unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/RethinkingEducation.pdf

 

Complementary

  • Arthurs, Jane, Drakopoulou, Sophia, & Gandini, Alessandro. (2018). Researching YouTube. Convergence, 24(1), 3–15. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354856517737222
  • Aparici, Roberto, Crovi, Delia, Ferrés, Joan & Scolari, Carlos (2010). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa 
  • Bennet, Andy, & Robards, Brady. (2014). Mediated Youth Cultures. The Internet, Belonging and New Cultural Configurations. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Black, Joanna, Castro, Juan-Carlos, & Lin, Ching-Chiu. (2015). Youth practices in digital arts and new media: Learning in formal and informal settings. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Brydon-Miller, Mary, & Maguire, Patricia. (2009). Participatory action research: contributions to the development of practitioner inquiry in education. Educational Action Research, 17, 79-93.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09650790802667469
  • boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. London/New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Buckingham, David. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity press.
  • Burgess, Jean & Green, Joshua. (2009). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press. 
  • Curwood, Jen S. (2013). The Hunger Games: Literature, literacy, and online affinity spaces. Language Arts, 90(6), 417-427.
  • Establés, María José. (2019). Estrategias y procesos de creación: aprendiendo de las comunidades de fans. In Lectoescritura digital (pp. 77-85). Madrid: Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional.
  • Ferrés, Joan. (2008) La educación como industria del deseo. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  • Ferrés, Joan. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  • Frau-Meigs, Divina and Torrent, Jordi. (2009). Media Education Policy: towards a Global Rationale. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001
  • Freire, Paulo. (1980). La educación como práctica de la libertad (26 ed.). Madrid: Siglo XXI.
  • Gee, James Paul (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York : Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Guerrero-Pico, Mar. (2019). Fanfiction y beta reading: escritura colaborativa en red. In Lectoescritura digital (pp. 61-68). Madrid: Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional.
  • Jenkins, Henry, Clinton Katie, et. al. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture : media education for the 21st century. London : The MIT Press 
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Cambridge: Polity Books.
  • Lammers, Jayne C., y Marsh, Valerie L. (2015). Going Public. An adolescent’s networked writing on fanfiction.net. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 59(3), 277-285. 
  • Kennedy, Melanie (2020) “If the rise of the TikTok dance and e-girl aesthetic has taught us anything, it’s that teenage girls rule the internet right now”: TikTok celebrity, girls and the Coronavirus crisis. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 23(6), 1069-1076. doi: https:/doi.org/10.1177/1367549420945341
  • Livingstone, Sonia., Bober, Magdalena, and Helsper, Ellen (2005). Internet literacy among children and young people: Findings from the UK Children go online project. London: LSE Research Online. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/397/1/UKCGOonlineLiteracy.pdf
  • Mateus, Julio César (2017) Las teleseries también educan. Una defensa de las ficciones televisivas como dispositivos de aprendizaje. En: Cappello, G. (ed.) Ficciones cercanas. Televisión, narración y espíritu de los tiempos. (pp. 179-195) Lima: Universidad de Lima. Fondo Editorial
  • Mateus, Julio César, Andrada Sola, Pablo., & Quiroz, María Teresa (2020). Media education in Latin America. New York: Routledge
  • Rosenbaum, Judith, E., Bonnet, Jennifer, L., Berry, R. Alan. (2021).  Beyond ‘fake news’: Opportunities and constraints for teaching news literacy. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 13(3), 153-159. https://doi.org/10.23860/JMLE-2021-13-3-16
  • Scolari, Carlos (Ed.) (2018). Teens, Media and Collaborative Cultures. Exploiting Teens’ Transmedia Skills in the Classroom [Adolescentes, Medios de Comunicación y Culturas Colaborativas. Aprovechando las Competencias Transmedia de los Jóvenes en el Aula]. Barcelona: European Commission and Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Tomasena, José Miguel (2019). Negotiating Collaborations: BookTubers, The Publishing Industry, and YouTube’s Ecosystem. Social Media + Society. https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305119894004
  • Willem, Cilia, Araüna, Núria, Tortajada, Iolanda (2019). Chonis and pijas: Slut-shaming and double standards in online performances among Spanish teens. Sexualities, 22(4), 532-548. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1363460717748620

 

Films

  • Born into brothels (2004), Zana Briski & Ross Kauffman.
  • Five days to dance (2014), José Andreu & Rafael Moles.

 


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

3381 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Audiovisual Communication

20485 - Audiovisual and Education


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
338 - Faculty of Communication
Study:
3381 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Audiovisual Communication
Subject:
20485 - Audiovisual and Education
Credits:
4.0
Course:
699 - Minor in Communication: 1
395 - Bachelor's degree in Audiovisual Communication: 3
395 - Bachelor's degree in Audiovisual Communication: 4
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Maria Castellvi Lloveras, María del Mar Guerrero Pico
Teaching Period:
First Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Media literacy involves the relationship of two fields of study: education and communication. It has received different names in recent decades such as pedagogy of communication, educommunication, education for television, digital education, and more recently, media and information literacy (MIL). 

In this course we will introduce the students to this field of study through theoretical sessions, workshops and presentations. The aim of the course is to develop basic notions about media literacy, to understand its evolution and to develop the ability to design and produce materials to be applied in different contexts. It is important to highlight that, in recent years, the deep transformations in media ecology have propelled a total rethinking of traditional models of media literacy.

Throughout this subject, students will question and reassess the most traditional formulas in order to understand the concept of media literacy within the new media ecosystems. It is also key to understand the mental mechanisms through which mass media and social media influence is carried out.

Associated skills

General competences 

  • Ability for critical and comprehensive analysis of communicative phenomena.

  • Ability to expand the proposed bibliography.

  • Ability to apply the newly acquired knowledge and skills in order to solve problems in new and unfamiliar environments and in broad contexts related to the field of study.

  • Ability to question and make the most of innovations, both technological and epistemological.

  • Ability to combine rigour with imagination and creativity.

  • Ability to apply theoretical knowledge to daily practice.  

  • Ability to communicate with clarity and precision the results of the activities carried out in the classroom.

  • Ability to work in a group and collaborate. 

  • Ability for criticism and self-criticism.

  • Ability to learn to learn.

 

Specific competences

  • To understand the concept of media literacy, its evolution and practice in recent decades.

  • To reflect on their own media practices, the competences that are developed through them and to understand their learning strategies.

  • To be able to propose and carry out a media literacy project adapted to the new media ecology in a real social context.

  • To acquire the ability to analyze audiovisual messages of an educational and cultural nature in terms of effectiveness.

  • To be able to find intersections between academic and cultural demands and the sensitivity and interests of the interlocutors.

  • To foster real-life applications of technological innovations and new communication practices in media literacy.

  • To rethink the educational and cultural audiovisual and multimedia sectors from the management of the audience’s emotional skills.

Sustainable Development Goals

The following Sustainable Development Goals will be reviewed throughout the course:

SDG 5: Gender equality

SDG 10: Reduce inequalities

SDG 16: Peace, justice, and strong institutions

Prerequisites

None

Contents

Unit 1. What is media literacy?

  • Most important theoretical concepts about media literacy

  • Education in media and through the media

  • Evolution of media literacy

  • Media education competences

Unit 2. Application of Media Literacy

  • Universal declarations

  • Legislating on Media Literacy: Spanish and European education laws

Unit 3. How to research Media Literacy

  • National and international Media Literacy research projects 

  • Main research methods used in media literacy projects

Unit 4. New trends in Media Literacy

  • The New Literacies and informal learning spaces I: Fandom

  • The New Literacies and informal learning spaces II: Video games and YouTube

  • Transmedia Literacy

  • Influencers: mapping learning on social media

The definitive syllabus and class schedule will be available at Aula Global.

Teaching Methods

Throughout the course, different active learning methods are combined: master classes, individual and group readings, class debates, student presentations, video screenings, dialogues with guest speakers, and especially, learning through research/action projects. All these methods will be carried out in-person every Friday at Room 52.423 from 9.00 am to 12.30 pm with a 15-minute coffee break in between.

Aula Global will be the hub of our course: all the resources, tasks and (only if necessary) online sessions will be notified through this platform. Please, monitor Aula Global regularly.

Every week, students will be required to read the texts corresponding to each session so that there will always be a common topic for discussion and participation in different learning activities (individual and group readings, lectures, debates, interactive quizzes and challenges, etc.).

Students will be required to develop a Group Project related to Media Literacy (see the Project Guide at Aula Global for specific guidelines). Practice and mentoring sessions for these projects will take place in small team gatherings in the classroom between 11.00 am and 12.30 pm after the coffee break.

IMPORTANT: Aula Global will be the only valid method to submit assignments. Submissions by email or any other method will not be accepted, as a general rule.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

 

Session/Day

Units

Mandatory readings

Tasks

1

30th

September

Welcome/Course presentation

Basic concepts related to media literacy

Mar Guerrero-Pico


––Bulger, M. & Davison, P. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute.


––Potter, W. J. (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. 

Warm-up discussion in the classroom


Group work in the classroom

2

7th October

Understanding media competences

María Castellví

––Ferrés, J. and Piscitelli, A. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. 


Group work in the classroom

3

14th October

Media Literacy in Practice 1: Visit to Barri Media Lab 

Guest speakers: J.M. Tomasena & Alicia Alcalde (Barri Media Lab)




None.


Barri Media Lab is a community audiovisual education and creation project established in the heart of Poblenou, Barcelona. They offer workshops and training courses that enhance the civic and creative possibilities of media so that participants can tell their own story through multiple languages: photography, video, sound and writing.

Field trip and on-site presentation at Barri Media Lab (time and address to be confirmed)

4

21st October

Contemporary issues related to Media Literacy:  problems and educational proposals

––Grandío, María del Mar, Dilli, Sirin, and O’Neill, Brian. (2017). Legal Frameworks for Media and Information Literacy. In D. Frau-Meigs, I. Velez, & J. Flores Michel (Eds.), Public Policies in Media and Information Literacy in Europe: Cross-Country Comparisons, pp. 116-129

Group work in the classroom 



DEADLINE 20th October: Project team formations. Communication via Aula Global.




5

28th October

Film forum: Born into Brothels




Research methods for Media Literacy Research / Action

Guest speaker: 

Mittzy Arciniega




––Rangan, P. (2011). Immaterial child labor: Media advocacy, autoethnography, and the case of Born into Brothels. Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, 25(3): 143-177


––Jagers, R, S., & Flanagan, C. (2021). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2), 201-216.




Film screening and forum:  Born into brothels (2004), a documentary by Zana Briski and Ross Kaufman (125 m.)


SUBMISSION 26th October: project abstract (topic and competences). Submission via Aula Global.



6

4th November

The New Literacies: fandom, videogames and other informal learning spaces

Mar Guerrero-Pico




––Jenkins, H (2019). Art Happens not in Isolation, but in Community: The Collective Literacies of Media Fandom. Culture Science Journal, 11(1), 78-88.


—Toh, Weimin, & Lim, Fei Victor. (2021). Using Video Games for Learning: Developing a Metalanguage for Digital Play. Games and Culture, 16(5), 583–610.



Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

7

11th November

Transmedia Literacy


Mar Guerrero-Pico

––Masanet, M-J., Guerrero-Pico, M., Establés, M-J. (2019. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413.

Bonus reading

––Scolari, C. Masanet, M-J., Guerrero-Pico, M., & Establés, M-J. (2018). Transmedia Literacy in the New Media Ecology. An International Map of Teens’ Transmedia Skills and Informal Learning Strategies. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 801-812. 

Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

8

18th November

Media Literacy in Practice II: The case of Nadir


Guest speakers:


Eloi Sánchez & Clàudia Barberà (Nadir)




None.


Nadir  is an educational project formed by four filmmakers specialised in audiovisual education with children and young people. They conduct workshops in collaboration with educational centers, leisure spaces or social entities based on the practical and experiential work of all participants.

Master class by Nadir


Project mentoring in the classroom

9

25th November

What’s to learn about influencers?


María Castellví

Reading to be confirmed.


Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

10

2nd December

Group project presentations

None.

Project presentations,  discussion, and course farewell. 


SUBMISSION 2nd December: peer-review report. Submission via Aula Global.



SUBMISSION 7th December: project report. Submission via Aula Global.

SUBMISSION 16th December: Personal essay on media literacy. Submission via Aula Global.

Evaluation

The evaluation of the course is composed of three elements, as detailed in the following table:


Items  to evaluate

Type

Weigh

Submission date

Project on media literacy 

Presentation

Group

10%

2/12/2022

Presentation peer-review

Group 

10%

2/12/2022

Report

Group

40%

7/12/2022


Personal essay on media literacy

Individual

30%

16/12/2021


Participation in weekly activities (individual reading, group work, etc.) in the classroom.

Individual

10%

Throughout the course

 

NOTE: The final mark will be the sum of the three items. Students must achieve a minimum 5/10 mark in all items in order to pass the course.

REMEDIAL TASKS: In case students do not earn the minimum mark in some of the items, they are expected to re-submit a new version of the pending ones during the second-chance assessment period of the term. To qualify for this second-chance period, students must have submitted all items during the regular assessment period of the term–that is, students featured as Not Submitted in some of the items by the 17th of December will be excluded from the process and thus qualified as Not Submitted in the final mark.

Bibliography and information resources

Basic

  • Buckingham, David. (2019). The Media Education Manifesto. Polity Press.
  • Bulger, Monica and Davison, Patrick. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute. Retrieved from https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Media_Literacy_2018.pdf
  • Ferrés, Joan & Piscitelli, Alejandro. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08
  • Frau-Meigs, Divina, Kotilainen, Sirkku, Pathak-Shelak, Manisha, Hoechsmann, Michael, Poyntz, Stuart R. (2020). The Handbook of Media Education Research. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Gee, James Paul & Hayes, Elisabeth. (2012). Nurturing afinity spaces and game-based learning. In C. Steinkuehler, K. Squire, & S. Barab (Eds.), Games, Learning, and Society: Learning and Meaning in the Digital Age (pp. 129–155). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139031127.015
  • Grandío, María del Mar, Dilli, Sirin, and O’Neill, Brian. (2017). Legal Frameworks for Media and Information Literacy. In D. Frau-Meigs, I. Velez, & J. Flores Michel (Eds.), Public Policies in Media and Information Literacy in Europe: Cross-Country Comparisons (pp. 116-129). London/New York: Routledge.
  • Hoechsmann, Michael, & Poyntz, Stuart R. (2012). Media Literacies: A Critical Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Jagers, Robert  & Flanagan,  Constance (2021). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2020.1865613
  • Jenkins, Henry (2019). Art Happens not in Isolation, but in Community: The Collective Literacies of Media Fandom. Culture Science Journal, 11(1), 78-88. https://doi.org/10.5334/csci.125
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Polity Books.
  • Lankshear, Colin, & Knobel, Michelle. (2013). A New Literacies Reader: Educational Perspectives. Peter Lang.
  • Livingstone, Sonia. and Sefton-Green, Julian. (2016). The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. NYU Press.
  • Masanet, Maria-Jose, Guerrero-Pico, Mar, and Establés, María-José. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2019.1641513
  • Mihailidis, Paul. (2019). Civic Media Literacies:  Reimagining Human Condition in an Age of Digital Abundance. Routledge. 
  • Potter, W. James (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462
  • Sádaba, Charo, & Salaverría, Ramón. (2022). Tackling disinformation with media literacy: analysis of trends in the European Union. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 81, 17-33. https://www.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2023-1552
  • Scolari, Carlos, Masanet, María José, Guerrero-Pico, Mar and Establés, María José (2018). Transmedia Literacy in the New Media Ecology. An International Map of Teens’ Transmedia Skills and Informal Learning Strategies. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 801-812. doi: https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.jul.09
  • Toh, Weimin, & Lim, Fei Victor. (2021). Using Video Games for Learning: Developing a Metalanguage for Digital Play. Games and Culture, 16(5), 583–610. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412020921339
  • UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking Education: Towards a global common good? Retrieved from https://unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/RethinkingEducation.pdf

 

Complementary

  • Arthurs, Jane, Drakopoulou, Sophia, & Gandini, Alessandro. (2018). Researching YouTube. Convergence, 24(1), 3–15. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354856517737222
  • Aparici, Roberto, Crovi, Delia, Ferrés, Joan & Scolari, Carlos (2010). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa 
  • Bennet, Andy, & Robards, Brady. (2014). Mediated Youth Cultures. The Internet, Belonging and New Cultural Configurations. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Black, Joanna, Castro, Juan-Carlos, & Lin, Ching-Chiu. (2015). Youth practices in digital arts and new media: Learning in formal and informal settings. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Brydon-Miller, Mary, & Maguire, Patricia. (2009). Participatory action research: contributions to the development of practitioner inquiry in education. Educational Action Research, 17, 79-93.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09650790802667469
  • boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. London/New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Buckingham, David. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity press.
  • Burgess, Jean & Green, Joshua. (2009). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press. 
  • Curwood, Jen S. (2013). The Hunger Games: Literature, literacy, and online affinity spaces. Language Arts, 90(6), 417-427.
  • Establés, María José. (2019). Estrategias y procesos de creación: aprendiendo de las comunidades de fans. In Lectoescritura digital (pp. 77-85). Madrid: Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional.
  • Ferrés, Joan. (2008) La educación como industria del deseo. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  • Ferrés, Joan. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  • Frau-Meigs, Divina and Torrent, Jordi. (2009). Media Education Policy: towards a Global Rationale. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001
  • Freire, Paulo. (1980). La educación como práctica de la libertad (26 ed.). Madrid: Siglo XXI.
  • Gee, James Paul (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York : Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Guerrero-Pico, Mar. (2019). Fanfiction y beta reading: escritura colaborativa en red. In Lectoescritura digital (pp. 61-68). Madrid: Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional.
  • Jenkins, Henry, Clinton Katie, et. al. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture : media education for the 21st century. London : The MIT Press 
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Cambridge: Polity Books.
  • Lammers, Jayne C., y Marsh, Valerie L. (2015). Going Public. An adolescent’s networked writing on fanfiction.net. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 59(3), 277-285. 
  • Kennedy, Melanie (2020) “If the rise of the TikTok dance and e-girl aesthetic has taught us anything, it’s that teenage girls rule the internet right now”: TikTok celebrity, girls and the Coronavirus crisis. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 23(6), 1069-1076. doi: https:/doi.org/10.1177/1367549420945341
  • Livingstone, Sonia., Bober, Magdalena, and Helsper, Ellen (2005). Internet literacy among children and young people: Findings from the UK Children go online project. London: LSE Research Online. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/397/1/UKCGOonlineLiteracy.pdf
  • Mateus, Julio César (2017) Las teleseries también educan. Una defensa de las ficciones televisivas como dispositivos de aprendizaje. En: Cappello, G. (ed.) Ficciones cercanas. Televisión, narración y espíritu de los tiempos. (pp. 179-195) Lima: Universidad de Lima. Fondo Editorial
  • Mateus, Julio César, Andrada Sola, Pablo., & Quiroz, María Teresa (2020). Media education in Latin America. New York: Routledge
  • Rosenbaum, Judith, E., Bonnet, Jennifer, L., Berry, R. Alan. (2021).  Beyond ‘fake news’: Opportunities and constraints for teaching news literacy. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 13(3), 153-159. https://doi.org/10.23860/JMLE-2021-13-3-16
  • Scolari, Carlos (Ed.) (2018). Teens, Media and Collaborative Cultures. Exploiting Teens’ Transmedia Skills in the Classroom [Adolescentes, Medios de Comunicación y Culturas Colaborativas. Aprovechando las Competencias Transmedia de los Jóvenes en el Aula]. Barcelona: European Commission and Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Tomasena, José Miguel (2019). Negotiating Collaborations: BookTubers, The Publishing Industry, and YouTube’s Ecosystem. Social Media + Society. https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305119894004
  • Willem, Cilia, Araüna, Núria, Tortajada, Iolanda (2019). Chonis and pijas: Slut-shaming and double standards in online performances among Spanish teens. Sexualities, 22(4), 532-548. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1363460717748620

 

Films

  • Born into brothels (2004), Zana Briski & Ross Kauffman.
  • Five days to dance (2014), José Andreu & Rafael Moles.

 


Academic Year/course: 2022/23

3381 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Audiovisual Communication

20485 - Audiovisual and Education


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
338 - Faculty of Communication
Study:
3381 - Bachelor's (degree) programme in Audiovisual Communication
Subject:
20485 - Audiovisual and Education
Credits:
4.0
Course:
699 - Minor in Communication: 1
395 - Bachelor's degree in Audiovisual Communication: 3
395 - Bachelor's degree in Audiovisual Communication: 4
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Teachers:
Maria Castellvi Lloveras, María del Mar Guerrero Pico
Teaching Period:
First Quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

Media literacy involves the relationship of two fields of study: education and communication. It has received different names in recent decades such as pedagogy of communication, educommunication, education for television, digital education, and more recently, media and information literacy (MIL). 

In this course we will introduce the students to this field of study through theoretical sessions, workshops and presentations. The aim of the course is to develop basic notions about media literacy, to understand its evolution and to develop the ability to design and produce materials to be applied in different contexts. It is important to highlight that, in recent years, the deep transformations in media ecology have propelled a total rethinking of traditional models of media literacy.

Throughout this subject, students will question and reassess the most traditional formulas in order to understand the concept of media literacy within the new media ecosystems. It is also key to understand the mental mechanisms through which mass media and social media influence is carried out.

Associated skills

General competences 

  • Ability for critical and comprehensive analysis of communicative phenomena.

  • Ability to expand the proposed bibliography.

  • Ability to apply the newly acquired knowledge and skills in order to solve problems in new and unfamiliar environments and in broad contexts related to the field of study.

  • Ability to question and make the most of innovations, both technological and epistemological.

  • Ability to combine rigour with imagination and creativity.

  • Ability to apply theoretical knowledge to daily practice.  

  • Ability to communicate with clarity and precision the results of the activities carried out in the classroom.

  • Ability to work in a group and collaborate. 

  • Ability for criticism and self-criticism.

  • Ability to learn to learn.

 

Specific competences

  • To understand the concept of media literacy, its evolution and practice in recent decades.

  • To reflect on their own media practices, the competences that are developed through them and to understand their learning strategies.

  • To be able to propose and carry out a media literacy project adapted to the new media ecology in a real social context.

  • To acquire the ability to analyze audiovisual messages of an educational and cultural nature in terms of effectiveness.

  • To be able to find intersections between academic and cultural demands and the sensitivity and interests of the interlocutors.

  • To foster real-life applications of technological innovations and new communication practices in media literacy.

  • To rethink the educational and cultural audiovisual and multimedia sectors from the management of the audience’s emotional skills.

Sustainable Development Goals

The following Sustainable Development Goals will be reviewed throughout the course:

SDG 5: Gender equality

SDG 10: Reduce inequalities

SDG 16: Peace, justice, and strong institutions

Prerequisites

None

Contents

Unit 1. What is media literacy?

  • Most important theoretical concepts about media literacy

  • Education in media and through the media

  • Evolution of media literacy

  • Media education competences

Unit 2. Application of Media Literacy

  • Universal declarations

  • Legislating on Media Literacy: Spanish and European education laws

Unit 3. How to research Media Literacy

  • National and international Media Literacy research projects 

  • Main research methods used in media literacy projects

Unit 4. New trends in Media Literacy

  • The New Literacies and informal learning spaces I: Fandom

  • The New Literacies and informal learning spaces II: Video games and YouTube

  • Transmedia Literacy

  • Influencers: mapping learning on social media

The definitive syllabus and class schedule will be available at Aula Global.

Teaching Methods

Throughout the course, different active learning methods are combined: master classes, individual and group readings, class debates, student presentations, video screenings, dialogues with guest speakers, and especially, learning through research/action projects. All these methods will be carried out in-person every Friday at Room 52.423 from 9.00 am to 12.30 pm with a 15-minute coffee break in between.

Aula Global will be the hub of our course: all the resources, tasks and (only if necessary) online sessions will be notified through this platform. Please, monitor Aula Global regularly.

Every week, students will be required to read the texts corresponding to each session so that there will always be a common topic for discussion and participation in different learning activities (individual and group readings, lectures, debates, interactive quizzes and challenges, etc.).

Students will be required to develop a Group Project related to Media Literacy (see the Project Guide at Aula Global for specific guidelines). Practice and mentoring sessions for these projects will take place in small team gatherings in the classroom between 11.00 am and 12.30 pm after the coffee break.

IMPORTANT: Aula Global will be the only valid method to submit assignments. Submissions by email or any other method will not be accepted, as a general rule.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

 

Session/Day

Units

Mandatory readings

Tasks

1

30th

September

Welcome/Course presentation

Basic concepts related to media literacy

Mar Guerrero-Pico


––Bulger, M. & Davison, P. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute.


––Potter, W. J. (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. 

Warm-up discussion in the classroom


Group work in the classroom

2

7th October

Understanding media competences

María Castellví

––Ferrés, J. and Piscitelli, A. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. 


Group work in the classroom

3

14th October

Media Literacy in Practice 1: Visit to Barri Media Lab 

Guest speakers: J.M. Tomasena & Alicia Alcalde (Barri Media Lab)




None.


Barri Media Lab is a community audiovisual education and creation project established in the heart of Poblenou, Barcelona. They offer workshops and training courses that enhance the civic and creative possibilities of media so that participants can tell their own story through multiple languages: photography, video, sound and writing.

Field trip and on-site presentation at Barri Media Lab (time and address to be confirmed)

4

21st October

Contemporary issues related to Media Literacy:  problems and educational proposals

––Grandío, María del Mar, Dilli, Sirin, and O’Neill, Brian. (2017). Legal Frameworks for Media and Information Literacy. In D. Frau-Meigs, I. Velez, & J. Flores Michel (Eds.), Public Policies in Media and Information Literacy in Europe: Cross-Country Comparisons, pp. 116-129

Group work in the classroom 



DEADLINE 20th October: Project team formations. Communication via Aula Global.




5

28th October

Film forum: Born into Brothels




Research methods for Media Literacy Research / Action

Guest speaker: 

Mittzy Arciniega




––Rangan, P. (2011). Immaterial child labor: Media advocacy, autoethnography, and the case of Born into Brothels. Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, 25(3): 143-177


––Jagers, R, S., & Flanagan, C. (2021). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2), 201-216.




Film screening and forum:  Born into brothels (2004), a documentary by Zana Briski and Ross Kaufman (125 m.)


SUBMISSION 26th October: project abstract (topic and competences). Submission via Aula Global.



6

4th November

The New Literacies: fandom, videogames and other informal learning spaces

Mar Guerrero-Pico




––Jenkins, H (2019). Art Happens not in Isolation, but in Community: The Collective Literacies of Media Fandom. Culture Science Journal, 11(1), 78-88.


—Toh, Weimin, & Lim, Fei Victor. (2021). Using Video Games for Learning: Developing a Metalanguage for Digital Play. Games and Culture, 16(5), 583–610.



Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

7

11th November

Transmedia Literacy


Mar Guerrero-Pico

––Masanet, M-J., Guerrero-Pico, M., Establés, M-J. (2019. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413.

Bonus reading

––Scolari, C. Masanet, M-J., Guerrero-Pico, M., & Establés, M-J. (2018). Transmedia Literacy in the New Media Ecology. An International Map of Teens’ Transmedia Skills and Informal Learning Strategies. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 801-812. 

Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

8

18th November

Media Literacy in Practice II: The case of Nadir


Guest speakers:


Eloi Sánchez & Clàudia Barberà (Nadir)




None.


Nadir  is an educational project formed by four filmmakers specialised in audiovisual education with children and young people. They conduct workshops in collaboration with educational centers, leisure spaces or social entities based on the practical and experiential work of all participants.

Master class by Nadir


Project mentoring in the classroom

9

25th November

What’s to learn about influencers?


María Castellví

Reading to be confirmed.


Group work and project mentoring in the classroom

10

2nd December

Group project presentations

None.

Project presentations,  discussion, and course farewell. 


SUBMISSION 2nd December: peer-review report. Submission via Aula Global.



SUBMISSION 7th December: project report. Submission via Aula Global.

SUBMISSION 16th December: Personal essay on media literacy. Submission via Aula Global.

Evaluation

The evaluation of the course is composed of three elements, as detailed in the following table:


Items  to evaluate

Type

Weigh

Submission date

Project on media literacy 

Presentation

Group

10%

2/12/2022

Presentation peer-review

Group 

10%

2/12/2022

Report

Group

40%

7/12/2022


Personal essay on media literacy

Individual

30%

16/12/2021


Participation in weekly activities (individual reading, group work, etc.) in the classroom.

Individual

10%

Throughout the course

 

NOTE: The final mark will be the sum of the three items. Students must achieve a minimum 5/10 mark in all items in order to pass the course.

REMEDIAL TASKS: In case students do not earn the minimum mark in some of the items, they are expected to re-submit a new version of the pending ones during the second-chance assessment period of the term. To qualify for this second-chance period, students must have submitted all items during the regular assessment period of the term–that is, students featured as Not Submitted in some of the items by the 17th of December will be excluded from the process and thus qualified as Not Submitted in the final mark.

Bibliography and information resources

Basic

  • Buckingham, David. (2019). The Media Education Manifesto. Polity Press.
  • Bulger, Monica and Davison, Patrick. (2018). The Promises, Challenges, and Futures of Media Literacy. Data & Society Research Institute. Retrieved from https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Media_Literacy_2018.pdf
  • Ferrés, Joan & Piscitelli, Alejandro. (2012). Media Competence. Articulated Proposal of Dimensions and Indicators. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-08
  • Frau-Meigs, Divina, Kotilainen, Sirkku, Pathak-Shelak, Manisha, Hoechsmann, Michael, Poyntz, Stuart R. (2020). The Handbook of Media Education Research. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Gee, James Paul & Hayes, Elisabeth. (2012). Nurturing afinity spaces and game-based learning. In C. Steinkuehler, K. Squire, & S. Barab (Eds.), Games, Learning, and Society: Learning and Meaning in the Digital Age (pp. 129–155). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139031127.015
  • Grandío, María del Mar, Dilli, Sirin, and O’Neill, Brian. (2017). Legal Frameworks for Media and Information Literacy. In D. Frau-Meigs, I. Velez, & J. Flores Michel (Eds.), Public Policies in Media and Information Literacy in Europe: Cross-Country Comparisons (pp. 116-129). London/New York: Routledge.
  • Hoechsmann, Michael, & Poyntz, Stuart R. (2012). Media Literacies: A Critical Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Jagers, Robert  & Flanagan,  Constance (2021). Using critical media literacy and Youth-Led research to promote the sociopolitical development of black youth: Strategies from our voices. Applied Developmental Science, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2020.1865613
  • Jenkins, Henry (2019). Art Happens not in Isolation, but in Community: The Collective Literacies of Media Fandom. Culture Science Journal, 11(1), 78-88. https://doi.org/10.5334/csci.125
  • Jenkins, Henry., Ito, Mizuko, & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Polity Books.
  • Lankshear, Colin, & Knobel, Michelle. (2013). A New Literacies Reader: Educational Perspectives. Peter Lang.
  • Livingstone, Sonia. and Sefton-Green, Julian. (2016). The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. NYU Press.
  • Masanet, Maria-Jose, Guerrero-Pico, Mar, and Establés, María-José. From digital native to digital apprentice. A case study of the transmedia skills and informal learning strategies of adolescents in Spain. Learning, Media and Technology, 44(3), 400-413. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2019.1641513
  • Mihailidis, Paul. (2019). Civic Media Literacies:  Reimagining Human Condition in an Age of Digital Abundance. Routledge. 
  • Potter, W. James (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675–696. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462
  • Sádaba, Charo, & Salaverría, Ramón. (2022). Tackling disinformation with media literacy: analysis of trends in the European Union. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 81, 17-33. https://www.doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-2023-1552
  • Scolari, Carlos, Masanet, María José, Guerrero-Pico, Mar and Establés, María José (2018). Transmedia Literacy in the New Media Ecology. An International Map of Teens’ Transmedia Skills and Informal Learning Strategies. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 801-812. doi: https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.jul.09
  • Toh, Weimin, & Lim, Fei Victor. (2021). Using Video Games for Learning: Developing a Metalanguage for Digital Play. Games and Culture, 16(5), 583–610. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412020921339
  • UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking Education: Towards a global common good? Retrieved from https://unevoc.unesco.org/e-forum/RethinkingEducation.pdf

 

Complementary

  • Arthurs, Jane, Drakopoulou, Sophia, & Gandini, Alessandro. (2018). Researching YouTube. Convergence, 24(1), 3–15. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354856517737222
  • Aparici, Roberto, Crovi, Delia, Ferrés, Joan & Scolari, Carlos (2010). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa 
  • Bennet, Andy, & Robards, Brady. (2014). Mediated Youth Cultures. The Internet, Belonging and New Cultural Configurations. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Black, Joanna, Castro, Juan-Carlos, & Lin, Ching-Chiu. (2015). Youth practices in digital arts and new media: Learning in formal and informal settings. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Brydon-Miller, Mary, & Maguire, Patricia. (2009). Participatory action research: contributions to the development of practitioner inquiry in education. Educational Action Research, 17, 79-93.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09650790802667469
  • boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. London/New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Buckingham, David. (2003). Media Education: Literacy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity press.
  • Burgess, Jean & Green, Joshua. (2009). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press. 
  • Curwood, Jen S. (2013). The Hunger Games: Literature, literacy, and online affinity spaces. Language Arts, 90(6), 417-427.
  • Establés, María José. (2019). Estrategias y procesos de creación: aprendiendo de las comunidades de fans. In Lectoescritura digital (pp. 77-85). Madrid: Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional.
  • Ferrés, Joan. (2008) La educación como industria del deseo. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  • Ferrés, Joan. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  • Frau-Meigs, Divina and Torrent, Jordi. (2009). Media Education Policy: towards a Global Rationale. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001
  • Freire, Paulo. (1980). La educación como práctica de la libertad (26 ed.). Madrid: Siglo XXI.
  • Gee, James Paul (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York : Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Guerrero-Pico, Mar. (2019). Fanfiction y beta reading: escritura colaborativa en red. In Lectoescritura digital (pp. 61-68). Madrid: Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional.
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  • Lammers, Jayne C., y Marsh, Valerie L. (2015). Going Public. An adolescent’s networked writing on fanfiction.net. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 59(3), 277-285. 
  • Kennedy, Melanie (2020) “If the rise of the TikTok dance and e-girl aesthetic has taught us anything, it’s that teenage girls rule the internet right now”: TikTok celebrity, girls and the Coronavirus crisis. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 23(6), 1069-1076. doi: https:/doi.org/10.1177/1367549420945341
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Films

  • Born into brothels (2004), Zana Briski & Ross Kauffman.
  • Five days to dance (2014), José Andreu & Rafael Moles.