Consulta de Guies Docents



Academic Year: 2022/23

3353 - Bachelor's degree in Humanities

20016 - English Literature


Teaching Guide Information

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
335 - Faculty of Humanities
Study:
3353 - Bachelor's degree in Humanities
Subject:
20016 - English Literature
Ambit:
---
Credits:
6.0
Course:
2
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Group 103: English
Group 104: English
Group 201: English
Group 202: English
Group 203: English
Group 204: English
Teachers:
Maria Antonia Oliver Rotger, Pere Gifra Adroher
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

[Aquesta assignatura forma part del pla d'implementació 2021-22 del projecte d'innovació i transformació pedagògica EDVOLUCIÓ de la UPF. Per aquest motiu, les dades consignades en aquest PDA podrien experimentar alguns canvis en els apartats de Competències, Continguts, Metodologia i Avaluació, sempre abans de l'inici de les classes].

In this course students will acquire, in the first place, basic knowledge on major periods and authors of the English literary tradition. Secondly, they will develop the ability to recognize the literariness of a text, i.e., the ability to appreciate the formal resources that produce certain communicative and aesthetic effects. 

Associated skills

Equally essential to achieve the main goals of the subject are the acquisition of a metalanguage on literary and linguistic resources and the ability to apply it to literary texts. This course wil also reinforce the students’ linguistic and discursive skills so as to enable them to read non-abridged literary texts in English, analyze their structure, understand the mechanisms for creating textual meaning, and finally articulate their own ideas about such texts in a coherently organized and grammatically correct manner. 

Learning outcomes

The acquisition of the knowledge in the subject will be aimed at the development of the critical analysis of  literary works in English as well as on the ability to make connections between the literary text and other texts, and between the literary and other artistic discourses.

Sustainable Development Goals

#Quality Education

#Gender Equality

#Climate Action

Prerequisites

This course is entirely conducted in English. All the tasks, including the final exam, must be written in English. At the beginning of the course, students should have attained a solid B1 level in English of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) or a similar level. We recommend that you take advantage of the resources available at the university to improve your command of English: library self-learning materials, UPF language courses, the mentoring program in English, etc. Likewise, it is recommendable to pass the first-year subject “Llengua Anglesa per a les Humanitats” prior to registering for this course..

Contents

We will read and analyze texts that are representative of the periods below. Students are expected to be able to relate the texts to the major cultural, social and ideological events of the period in which they were written. They will also improve their skills to read literature in a foreign language and acquire the metalanguage to describe its textual mechanisms. In order to accomplish these three objectives in a short term, we will discuss poems, excerpts of novels, essays and plays, and short stories.

  1. The Beginnings: Old English
  2. Middle English 
  3. The English Renaissance
  4. The Seventeenth Century and the Metaphysical Poets
  5. The Restoration and Satire
  6. The Development of the Novel.
  7.  Romanticism
  8. The Victorian Age and the Beginning of the 20th Century. 

 

Teaching Methods

Active participation in the plenary and seminar classes will be encouraged. Consequently, a regular attendance to both the plenary classes and the seminars is paramount to pass the course. If you cannot attend, please contact your group instructor as soon as possible. We strongly recommend preparing the texts before class to be able to make the most of each session.

Please ask any questions you may have to your instructors in class or during their office hours. Instructors have no obligation to answer questions through email.

Evaluation

(40%) Seminars Tasks:

The tasks to be done will consist of written tasks established by your instructor. Written tasks (based on all the texts discussed both in the plenary and seminar sessions) will show your reading process leading to your understanding and interpretation of a given text. Late tasks turned in after the due date will be penalized with a deduction of 2 points per week of delay.

(60%) Participation and Final Exam:

The final exam will be based on all the texts discussed in both the plenary sessions and the seminar sessions. To pass this course students must obtain a mark of 5 out of 10 in the final exam.

Remedial Exam:

The UPF establishes that only those students who have attended the final exam (or who have turned in any other tasks graded by the instructors) may retake the final exam.

If you have followed the continuous assessment and passed it, the mark obtained in the retake final will be averaged with the mark of the graded tasks turned in during the term.

If you have not followed the continuous assessment, you may retake the final exam, but in this case your mark will be averaged with that of other activities chosen by the instructor, all in all not exceeding 70% of the full course grade.

Bibliography and information resources

Complementary bibliography to follow the course:

  • Estefania Villalba, Claves para interpretar la literatura inglesa (Madrid: Alianza, 2009);
  • Carter, Ronald & McRae, John, The Routledge History of Literature in English (London: Routledge, 1997);
  • Jonathan Bate, English Literature: a Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010)

Other relevant sources:

Barnard, R. A Short History of English Literature. (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell, 1994.

Blamires, H. A Short History of English Literature. (2nd. ed.). London: Routledge, 1984.

Bregazzi, Josephine. Shakespeare y el teatro renacentista inglés. Madrid: Alianza, 1999.

Carter, R. & McRae, J. The Penguin Guide to English Literature: Britain and Ireland. Hardmonsworth: Penguin. 1995.

Drabble, M. (ed.). The Oxford Companion to English Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1991.

Fowler, A. A History of English Literature. Oxford: Blackwell. 1987, 1994.

Galván, Fernando. Literatura inglesa medieval. Madrid: Alianza, 2001.

Gower, Roger.  Past into Present. London: Longman, 1990.

Montesinos, Toni. Muy al Norte en el turbio mar. Una historia de la literatura inglesa. Madrid: Guillermo Escolar, 2022.

Oliva, Salvador. Introducció a Shakespeare. Barcelona: Empúries, 2000.

Poplawski, Paul (ed.). English Literature in Context. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007.

 


Academic Year: 2022/23

3353 - Bachelor's degree in Humanities

20016 - English Literature


Informació de la Guia Docent

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
335 - Faculty of Humanities
Study:
3353 - Bachelor's degree in Humanities
Subject:
20016 - English Literature
Ambit:
---
Credits:
6.0
Course:
2
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Group 103: English
Group 104: English
Group 201: English
Group 202: English
Group 203: English
Group 204: English
Teachers:
Maria Antonia Oliver Rotger, Pere Gifra Adroher
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

[Aquesta assignatura forma part del pla d'implementació 2021-22 del projecte d'innovació i transformació pedagògica EDVOLUCIÓ de la UPF. Per aquest motiu, les dades consignades en aquest PDA podrien experimentar alguns canvis en els apartats de Competències, Continguts, Metodologia i Avaluació, sempre abans de l'inici de les classes].

In this course students will acquire, in the first place, basic knowledge on major periods and authors of the English literary tradition. Secondly, they will develop the ability to recognize the literariness of a text, i.e., the ability to appreciate the formal resources that produce certain communicative and aesthetic effects. 

Associated skills

Equally essential to achieve the main goals of the subject are the acquisition of a metalanguage on literary and linguistic resources and the ability to apply it to literary texts. This course wil also reinforce the students’ linguistic and discursive skills so as to enable them to read non-abridged literary texts in English, analyze their structure, understand the mechanisms for creating textual meaning, and finally articulate their own ideas about such texts in a coherently organized and grammatically correct manner. 

Learning outcomes

The acquisition of the knowledge in the subject will be aimed at the development of the critical analysis of  literary works in English as well as on the ability to make connections between the literary text and other texts, and between the literary and other artistic discourses.

Sustainable Development Goals

#Quality Education

#Gender Equality

#Climate Action

Prerequisites

This course is entirely conducted in English. All the tasks, including the final exam, must be written in English. At the beginning of the course, students should have attained a solid B1 level in English of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) or a similar level. We recommend that you take advantage of the resources available at the university to improve your command of English: library self-learning materials, UPF language courses, the mentoring program in English, etc. Likewise, it is recommendable to pass the first-year subject “Llengua Anglesa per a les Humanitats” prior to registering for this course..

Contents

We will read and analyze texts that are representative of the periods below. Students are expected to be able to relate the texts to the major cultural, social and ideological events of the period in which they were written. They will also improve their skills to read literature in a foreign language and acquire the metalanguage to describe its textual mechanisms. In order to accomplish these three objectives in a short term, we will discuss poems, excerpts of novels, essays and plays, and short stories.

  1. The Beginnings: Old English
  2. Middle English 
  3. The English Renaissance
  4. The Seventeenth Century and the Metaphysical Poets
  5. The Restoration and Satire
  6. The Development of the Novel.
  7.  Romanticism
  8. The Victorian Age and the Beginning of the 20th Century. 

 

Teaching Methods

Active participation in the plenary and seminar classes will be encouraged. Consequently, a regular attendance to both the plenary classes and the seminars is paramount to pass the course. If you cannot attend, please contact your group instructor as soon as possible. We strongly recommend preparing the texts before class to be able to make the most of each session.

Please ask any questions you may have to your instructors in class or during their office hours. Instructors have no obligation to answer questions through email.

Evaluation

(40%) Seminars Tasks:

The tasks to be done will consist of written tasks established by your instructor. Written tasks (based on all the texts discussed both in the plenary and seminar sessions) will show your reading process leading to your understanding and interpretation of a given text. Late tasks turned in after the due date will be penalized with a deduction of 2 points per week of delay.

(60%) Participation and Final Exam:

The final exam will be based on all the texts discussed in both the plenary sessions and the seminar sessions. To pass this course students must obtain a mark of 5 out of 10 in the final exam.

Remedial Exam:

The UPF establishes that only those students who have attended the final exam (or who have turned in any other tasks graded by the instructors) may retake the final exam.

If you have followed the continuous assessment and passed it, the mark obtained in the retake final will be averaged with the mark of the graded tasks turned in during the term.

If you have not followed the continuous assessment, you may retake the final exam, but in this case your mark will be averaged with that of other activities chosen by the instructor, all in all not exceeding 70% of the full course grade.

Bibliography and information resources

Complementary bibliography to follow the course:

  • Estefania Villalba, Claves para interpretar la literatura inglesa (Madrid: Alianza, 2009);
  • Carter, Ronald & McRae, John, The Routledge History of Literature in English (London: Routledge, 1997);
  • Jonathan Bate, English Literature: a Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010)

Other relevant sources:

Barnard, R. A Short History of English Literature. (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell, 1994.

Blamires, H. A Short History of English Literature. (2nd. ed.). London: Routledge, 1984.

Bregazzi, Josephine. Shakespeare y el teatro renacentista inglés. Madrid: Alianza, 1999.

Carter, R. & McRae, J. The Penguin Guide to English Literature: Britain and Ireland. Hardmonsworth: Penguin. 1995.

Drabble, M. (ed.). The Oxford Companion to English Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1991.

Fowler, A. A History of English Literature. Oxford: Blackwell. 1987, 1994.

Galván, Fernando. Literatura inglesa medieval. Madrid: Alianza, 2001.

Gower, Roger.  Past into Present. London: Longman, 1990.

Montesinos, Toni. Muy al Norte en el turbio mar. Una historia de la literatura inglesa. Madrid: Guillermo Escolar, 2022.

Oliva, Salvador. Introducció a Shakespeare. Barcelona: Empúries, 2000.

Poplawski, Paul (ed.). English Literature in Context. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007.

 


Academic Year: 2022/23

3353 - Bachelor's degree in Humanities

20016 - English Literature


Información de la Guía Docente

Academic Course:
2022/23
Academic Center:
335 - Faculty of Humanities
Study:
3353 - Bachelor's degree in Humanities
Subject:
20016 - English Literature
Ambit:
---
Credits:
6.0
Course:
2
Teaching languages:
Theory: Group 1: English
Group 2: English
Seminar: Group 101: English
Group 102: English
Group 103: English
Group 104: English
Group 201: English
Group 202: English
Group 203: English
Group 204: English
Teachers:
Maria Antonia Oliver Rotger, Pere Gifra Adroher
Teaching Period:
First quarter
Schedule:

Presentation

[Aquesta assignatura forma part del pla d'implementació 2021-22 del projecte d'innovació i transformació pedagògica EDVOLUCIÓ de la UPF. Per aquest motiu, les dades consignades en aquest PDA podrien experimentar alguns canvis en els apartats de Competències, Continguts, Metodologia i Avaluació, sempre abans de l'inici de les classes].

In this course students will acquire, in the first place, basic knowledge on major periods and authors of the English literary tradition. Secondly, they will develop the ability to recognize the literariness of a text, i.e., the ability to appreciate the formal resources that produce certain communicative and aesthetic effects. 

Associated skills

Equally essential to achieve the main goals of the subject are the acquisition of a metalanguage on literary and linguistic resources and the ability to apply it to literary texts. This course wil also reinforce the students’ linguistic and discursive skills so as to enable them to read non-abridged literary texts in English, analyze their structure, understand the mechanisms for creating textual meaning, and finally articulate their own ideas about such texts in a coherently organized and grammatically correct manner. 

Learning outcomes

The acquisition of the knowledge in the subject will be aimed at the development of the critical analysis of  literary works in English as well as on the ability to make connections between the literary text and other texts, and between the literary and other artistic discourses.

Sustainable Development Goals

#Quality Education

#Gender Equality

#Climate Action

Prerequisites

This course is entirely conducted in English. All the tasks, including the final exam, must be written in English. At the beginning of the course, students should have attained a solid B1 level in English of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) or a similar level. We recommend that you take advantage of the resources available at the university to improve your command of English: library self-learning materials, UPF language courses, the mentoring program in English, etc. Likewise, it is recommendable to pass the first-year subject “Llengua Anglesa per a les Humanitats” prior to registering for this course..

Contents

We will read and analyze texts that are representative of the periods below. Students are expected to be able to relate the texts to the major cultural, social and ideological events of the period in which they were written. They will also improve their skills to read literature in a foreign language and acquire the metalanguage to describe its textual mechanisms. In order to accomplish these three objectives in a short term, we will discuss poems, excerpts of novels, essays and plays, and short stories.

  1. The Beginnings: Old English
  2. Middle English 
  3. The English Renaissance
  4. The Seventeenth Century and the Metaphysical Poets
  5. The Restoration and Satire
  6. The Development of the Novel.
  7.  Romanticism
  8. The Victorian Age and the Beginning of the 20th Century. 

 

Teaching Methods

Active participation in the plenary and seminar classes will be encouraged. Consequently, a regular attendance to both the plenary classes and the seminars is paramount to pass the course. If you cannot attend, please contact your group instructor as soon as possible. We strongly recommend preparing the texts before class to be able to make the most of each session.

Please ask any questions you may have to your instructors in class or during their office hours. Instructors have no obligation to answer questions through email.

Evaluation

(40%) Seminars Tasks:

The tasks to be done will consist of written tasks established by your instructor. Written tasks (based on all the texts discussed both in the plenary and seminar sessions) will show your reading process leading to your understanding and interpretation of a given text. Late tasks turned in after the due date will be penalized with a deduction of 2 points per week of delay.

(60%) Participation and Final Exam:

The final exam will be based on all the texts discussed in both the plenary sessions and the seminar sessions. To pass this course students must obtain a mark of 5 out of 10 in the final exam.

Remedial Exam:

The UPF establishes that only those students who have attended the final exam (or who have turned in any other tasks graded by the instructors) may retake the final exam.

If you have followed the continuous assessment and passed it, the mark obtained in the retake final will be averaged with the mark of the graded tasks turned in during the term.

If you have not followed the continuous assessment, you may retake the final exam, but in this case your mark will be averaged with that of other activities chosen by the instructor, all in all not exceeding 70% of the full course grade.

Bibliography and information resources

Complementary bibliography to follow the course:

  • Estefania Villalba, Claves para interpretar la literatura inglesa (Madrid: Alianza, 2009);
  • Carter, Ronald & McRae, John, The Routledge History of Literature in English (London: Routledge, 1997);
  • Jonathan Bate, English Literature: a Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010)

Other relevant sources:

Barnard, R. A Short History of English Literature. (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell, 1994.

Blamires, H. A Short History of English Literature. (2nd. ed.). London: Routledge, 1984.

Bregazzi, Josephine. Shakespeare y el teatro renacentista inglés. Madrid: Alianza, 1999.

Carter, R. & McRae, J. The Penguin Guide to English Literature: Britain and Ireland. Hardmonsworth: Penguin. 1995.

Drabble, M. (ed.). The Oxford Companion to English Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1991.

Fowler, A. A History of English Literature. Oxford: Blackwell. 1987, 1994.

Galván, Fernando. Literatura inglesa medieval. Madrid: Alianza, 2001.

Gower, Roger.  Past into Present. London: Longman, 1990.

Montesinos, Toni. Muy al Norte en el turbio mar. Una historia de la literatura inglesa. Madrid: Guillermo Escolar, 2022.

Oliva, Salvador. Introducció a Shakespeare. Barcelona: Empúries, 2000.

Poplawski, Paul (ed.). English Literature in Context. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007.